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Thirty-Sixth 
Annual Catalogue 



Mansfield 
Normal . . 
School . . . 



ST' ilA 



1898-99 



THIRTY-SIXTH 



ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



PENNSYLVANIA 



State Normal School 



Mansfield, Tioga County, Pa. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1898-99. 



Mansfield, Pa.: 

Van Keuren & Coles, Printers, 

1898. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



CONTENTS. 



I 



Calendar 3 

Board of Trustees .4 

Standing Committees of Board 5 

Board of Instruction and Discipline . . 6 

State Board of Examiners 7 

Catalogue of Students g 

Courses ok Study 

Elementary Course 21 

Regular Normal Course 22 

Scientific Course 2 2 

Advanced Normal Course 22 

College Preparatory Courses .... 23 

Course in Agriculture 23 

Course in Art 34 

Courses in Music 24 

Material and Methods of Instruction26 

Department of Pedagogy 26 

The Work of the Model School ... 28 

Department of Language 44 

Department of Mathematics .... 49 



Department of Physical Science .... 50 
Department of History and Civil Gov. . 54 

Department of Gymnastics 55 

Department of the Arts 55 

Text Books Now in Use 58 

Library 59 

Reading Room 59 

Apparatus and Cabinet 59 

Literary Societies 59 

Lectures and Entertainments 60 

The Alumni Association 60 

Religious Associations 60 

Athletic Association 60 

Mansfield Normal School Quarterly . . 60 

Special Term for Teachers 61 

Location, Buildings and Grounds ... 61 
Final Examinations and Diplomas ... 62 

Expenses 53 

Prizes and Honors 66 

Directory of the Alumni 67 



I 






STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



CALENDAR FOR 1898-99. 



J 898. 

Au g- 3° — Tuesday Fall term opens. 

Nov. 23 — Wednesday Fall term ends. 

Nov. 28 — Monday Winter term begins. 

Dec. 24 — Saturday Holiday recess begins. 

J 899. 

Jan. 3 — Tuesday School reopens. 

Mar. 3 — Friday Winter term ends. 

Mar. 20 — Monday Spring term begins. 

May 1 — Monday Special term for teachers begins. 

June 19 — Monday morning . . . Exhibition of 'Gymnastics. 
Monday afternoon . . . Junior Class Day Exercises. 
Monday evening . . . Model School exercises. 
June 20 — Tuesday morning . . . Exhibition of Gymnastics. 
Tuesday afternoon . . . Senior Class Day exercises. 
Tuesday evening . . . Contests for the Gold Medals 

in Oratory and Composition. 

June 21 — Wednesday Annual meeting and banquet of 

the Alumni. 
Wednesday evening . . Literary exercises by the Alumni 

Association. 
June 22 — Thursday afternoon . . Graduation exercises. 
Thursday evening . . . Annual concert. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Representing the Stockholders. 

Term of Office Expires in 1901. 

Dr. J. M. Barden. H. F. Kingsley. 

E. A. Spencer. J. A. Elliott. 

Term of Office Expires in 1900. 

D. H. Pitts. E. L. Sperry. 

Dr. W. D. Vedder. F. E. Van Keuren. 

Term of Office Expires in 1899. 

J. C. Howe. Jos. S. Hoard. 

C. S. Ross. Volney Ripley. 

Representing the State. 

Term of Office Expires in 1901. 
Hon. H. B. Packer, Wellsboro. Dr. F. G. Elliott, Mansfield. 

Term of Office Expires in 1900. 
David Cameron, Wellsboro. T. H. Bailey, Mansfield. 

Term of Office Expires in 1899. 
Benton E. James, Montrose. Lee Brooks, Canton. 

Officers of the Board. 

D. H. Pitts, President. J. A. Elliott, Secretary. 

Edward H. Ross, Treasurer. 



Honorary Trustees. 

Hon. S. B. Elliott. 

Hon. C. V. Elliott. 



Peter V. Van Ness. 
A. M. Spencer. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



1898-99. 



C. S. Ross. 



Grounds and Buildings. 
Dr. F. G. Elliott. 



E. A. Spencer. 



Text Books, Apparatus, and Printing. 
J. S. Hoard. J. C Howe. T. H. Bailey. 



Instruction, and Discipline. 
Dr. J. M. Barden. J. A. Elliott. F. E. Van Keuren. 



H. F. Kingsley. 



Household. 
F. G. Elliott. 



Executive, and Financial. 
Dr. W. D. Vedder. E. L. Sperry. 



Volney Ripley. 



T. H. Bailey. 



Public Relations of the School. 

D. H. Pitts. Dr. J. M. Barden. Hon. H. B. Packer. 
Benton E. James. Lee Brooks. Hon. David Cameron. 

E. L. Sperry. J. C. Howe. E. A. Spencer. 
J. A. Elliott. J. S. Hoard. H. F. Kingsley. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION AND DISCIPLINE. 



S. H. Albro, A. M. (Brown Univ. ), Ph.D. (Colgate Univ.), Principal. 
Psychology, and History of Education. 

J. P. Breidinger, A. M. (Lafayette College), Vice-Principal. 
Mathematics. 

W. R. Longstreet, M. E. (Mansfield State Normal School), Principal 

of Model School. 

Methods, and Military Tactics. 

I. M. Cayman, M. S. (Lafayette College). 
Natural Sciences. 

C. Clayton Robertson, Ph. B. (Cornell University). 
Ancient Languages, and History. 

Irene Campbell Newhouse, A. B. (Cornell University). 
Latin and Greek. 

Fannie L. Sheldon, Ph. B. (Cornell University). 
Rhetoric, Literature, and German. 

H. J. Van Norman, B. S. (Cornell University). 
English Grammar and Arithmetic. 

Eliza J. Boyce (Mansfield State Normal School). 
Geography, and Critic in the Model School. 

Grace E. Barnum (Mt. Holyoke College; Posse Gymnasium). 
Gymnastics. 

Mrs. Mary A. Jenks (Fredonia State Normal School). 
Critic in the Model School. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL— FIFTH DISTRICT 1 

Board of Instruction and Discipline— Continued. 

Flora May Russell (Mansfield State Normal School). 
Teacher in the Model School. 

Caroline Sheldon (Cooper Institute). 
Drawing, and Painting. 

Mollie Tracy Weston, B. E. (Nat'l School Elocution and Oratory). 

Elocutioh and Oratory. 

W. A. Stocking, Jr., Ph. B. (Conn. Ag. College; Cornell University). 

Agriculture, and Nature Study. 

Myrtle J. Stone (Mansfield State Normal School; Oberlin College). 
Piano, Singing, Harmony, Theory and History of Music. 

Clara H. Merrick. 
Violin, and Piano. 

J. A. Elliott. 
Steward. 

Mrs. J. A. Elliott. 
Matron. 



STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS. 

John Q. Stewart, Deputy Superintendent Public Instruction. 

A. J. Davis, Principal Clarion Normal School. 

Mattie M. Collins, Superintendent of Cameron county. 

G. W. Weaver, Superintendent of Clearfield county. 

Charles J. Boak, Superintendent of Beaver Falls. 

John E. Myers, Superintendent of McKean county. 

C. D. Oberdorf, Superintendent_of Sunbury. 

T. B. Harrison, Superintendent of Luzerne county. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



NAME. 

Abernathy, Fred C 
Abson, F. Ed., 
Adair, Edwin M 
Adams, Charles H., 
Albert, G. A., . 
Albert, Wm. Leon 
Albro, Preston M 
Allen, Anthony T 
Andrus, Nellie E 
Argetsinger, Leon J 
Arnold, Juliet, 
Atvvood, Leon M 
Austin, Blanche 
Austin, Lettie, 
Ayers, LeRay, 
Aylesworth, Will F. 
Babcock, Floyd W 
Bacon, D. S., 
Bailey, Josephine M 
Bailey, Louis D 
Bailey, Mart B., 
Bailey, Ralph, . 
Baity, Maude, . 
Baity, Ralph, . 
Baker, Frank S. , 
Ballard, Fred W 
Ballard, James, 
Bambury, Elizabeth 
Bardwell, Walter S 
Barnes, Jennie, 
Barron, Helen, . 
Bartlett, Katherene 
Bartlett, Valeda M 
Barton, Belle, . 
Barton, Ina D., 



D 



ADDRESS. 

. Mardin, . . 

. Coudersport, 

. Mansfield, . 

, Trowbridge, 

. Mansfield, 

. Mansfield, . 

, Mansfield, . 

. Williwanna, 

. Columbia X Roads, 

. Mansfield, . . 

. Elk Lake, . . 

. LeRaysville, . 

Mainesburg, 

Mainesburg, 

Job's Corners, 

Blossburg, 
, Nelson, . . . 

Wellsboro, 

Mansfield, 

Mansfield, . . 

Mansfield, . 

Mansfield, . 

Canoe Camp, 

Canoe Camp, 

Job's Corners, 

Mansfield, . 

Mansfield, 

Blossburg, . 

Tunkhannock, 

Mansfield, 

South Montrose, 

Colegrove, . 

Mansfield, . 

Mansfield, 

Mansfield,' . 



CLASS. 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Preparatory ' 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Senior 

Col. Prep'y, Music 

Junior 

Music 

Senior 

Preparatory 

Senior 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Junior 

Junior, Elocution 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Junior 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Senior 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Graduate, Elocution 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



9 



Bates, Jessie C, . 

Bates, John P., . 

Bates, W. A., . . 

Baynes, Howard, 

Beach, B. Ellsworth 

Beach, Earle, . . 

Beach, Harry, . . 

Beardslee, Jennie M 

Bedell, Sarah M., 

Benedict, S. Eliza, 

Bennett, James, . 

Bennett, Luella, . 

Benson, N. Peter, 

Bixby, Mae, . . 

Bixby, Harry, . . 

Blair, Agnes, . . 

Blair, Walter A., . 

Blanchard, Charles, 

Bodine, Mattie Durell 

Bodler, Katie M. 

Bowker, May, . 

Brace, William N 

Bradford, Edna F, 

Bradford, Louise, 

Brehony, Kathryn, 

Breidinger, Mary, 

Brenckman, Lillie, 

Brennan, Patrick M 

Breon, Charles D., 

Brion, Perry A., . 

Brown, Ethel Mae, 

Brown, Gertrude M 

Brown, EeRoy W., 

Browne, Martha L 

Brown, Nellie M., 

Brownlee, William B 

Bundy, Emma, . 

Burke, Miles, . . 

Burrows, Urbane J 



H 



. Wellsboro. 
. Mansfield, 
. Mansfield, 
. Mansfield, 
. Mansfield, 
. Mansfield, 
. Mansfield, 
. Little Meadows 
. 1'airdale. 
. Powell, 
. Galeton, 
. Crooked Creek 
. Austin, . . 
. Mansfield, . 
. Mansfield, . 
. Blossburg, . 
. Arnot, . . 
, Farmington 
. Mansfield, . 
. Germania, . 
. Herrickville 

. Mansfield, . 
. Sylvania, 

. Sylvania, . 

. Avoca, . . 

. Mansfield, . 

. Hudsondale, 

. Carbondale, 

. Mansfield, . 

. Liberty, . . 

. East Lemon, 

. Somers Lane 

. Elkland, 

. Covington, 

. Nauvoo, 

. Ralston, . . 

. Odin, . . 

. Plains, . . 

. Stevensville, 



ill 



Preparatory 

Music 

Music 

Preparatory 

Graduate, Scientific 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Prep'y, Music, Art 

Senior 

Senior 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 
. Junior 

College Preparatory 
. Junior 
. Senior 
. Preparatory 
. Senior 
. Junior 
. Senior 
. Junior 
. Junior, Music 
. Music 
. Senior 
. Preparatory 
. Preparatory, Music 
. Preparatory 
. Senior, Music 
. Preparatory 
. College Preparatory 
. Senior 
. Preparatory 
. Senior 
. Preparatory 
. Preparatory 
. Preparatory 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Burt, Nellie K., . . 
Bushnell, Lena A., . 
Butler, Will George, 
Butts, Alice M., . . 
Butts, Mary B., . . 
Byron, Michael F., . 
Cahill, Anna Regina, 
Cameron, Leon B., . 
Campbell, Blanche, . 
Campbell, Esther, . 
Campbell, Ollie, . . 
Casbeer, Grace E., 
Cass, R. M., . . . 
Chapin, Delwin D., Jr 
Christian, Harriet L. 
Clark, Fannie M., 
Clark, Fordyce M.. 
Clarke, William T. , 
Clayson, Helena Rivers. 
Clement, Joseph, . . 
Clemons, Edna S., . 
Clemons, Margaret, 
Clemons, Mazie, . . 
Clifford, Matilda, 
Cloos, Harvey, . . 
Cloos, Mara, . . . 
Cokely, Lizzie May, 
Cole, Mattie Victoria, 
Colegrove, Prudence Amelia. 
Coleman, Judson Orlando, . 
Coles, Edwin S., . . 
Connelly, Carrie, 
Connelly, Ednah, 
Cooper, Mrs. J. R., 
Copestick, John G., 
Corcoran, Alice, . . 
Cornell, Lulu, . . . 
Cornwell, Elmer G., 
Corn well, R. Luvinia. 



Coudersport, . . 

Auburn 4 Corners, 

Blossburg, . 

Mansfield, . 

Mansfield, . 

Dushore, 

Wilkes Barre 

Wellsboro, 

Covington, 

East Troy, . 

Mansfield, . 

Elkland, 

Canoe Camp, 

Harrison Valley 

Laceyville, 

Mansfield, . . 

Mansfield, . . 

Waverly, N. Y., 

Granville Summit, 

Canoe Camp, 

Covington, 

Blossburg, . 

Covington, 

Avoca, . . 

Lawrenceville 

Lawrenceville 

Dimock, 

Clara, . . 

Mansfield, . 

LeRaysville, 

Mansfield, . 

Mainesburg, 

Mainesburg, 

Knoxville, . 

Stony Fork, 

Overton, 

New York, N. 

Mansfield, . 

Mansfield, . . . . Junior 



, Preparatory, Music 
Junior, Music 
Grad., Col. Prep'y 
College Prep'ry, Art 
Unclassified 
Senior 
Senior . 

Col. Prep'y, Music 
Preparatory 
Senior 
Preparatory 
Preparatory 
Preparatory 
Junior 
Junior 

Graduate, Scientific 
Junior 
Senior 
Senior 
Preparatory 
Junior 
Music 

Preparatory 
Junior 
Preparatory 
Senior 

Senior, Music 
Senior, Music 
Senior 
Junior 
Preparatory 
Preparatory 
Music 
Senior 

Graduate, Scientific 
Junior 

Prep'y, Music, Elocu 
Preparatory 



c 
i 

i 



STATE 



T54CHE 



RS 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



ru mcTDir'T 



i] 



Correll, Nellie G., . . . 
Cottrell, Clara D., . . . 
Coveney, Viall A., . . . 

Cowden, Mary, 

Crippen, Eugene, . . . 
Crittenden, Arthur Thomas 
Crittenden, Eugene Casson, 
Cunningham, Grace, . . . 
Cunningham, Robert R., , 
Dalburg, Frank A., 
Dalton, James C, 
Dann, Arthur J., . 
Dartt, Nina, . . . 
Day, Fred E., , . 
DeCoursey, Miles Manard 
Deitlin, Frank Edward; 
Denniston, Mary E., 
Dershimer, Mable, . . 
DeWitt, Anna Edith, 
Dibble, Ella, . . . , 
Ditchburn, David T. , . 
Ditchburn, John William 
Doane, E. Josephine. 
Doane, Stella Tabor, 
Dodge, Bertha L., . 
Dolphin, Elizabeth Lauretta 
Dorsett, Mrs. Edward. 
Doud, Dornah, . . 
Doughty, Frank, . . 
Duer, Agnes I., . . 
Dunnigan, Mary, . . 
Eadie, Florence G. , 
Edgerton, Merritt B., 
Elliott, Beatrice M., 
Elliott, Charles M., 
Elliott, Daisy, . . . 
Ellsworth, Ellis D., 
English, Andrew, 
English, Gertrude, . . 



N. Y 



Covington 
Mansfield, 
Mardin, . 
Westfield, 
Rutland, 
Oswayo, 
Oswayo, . 
Mansfield, 
Mansfield, 
Red Burn, 
Mansfield, 
Elk Run, 
Wellsboro, 
Lamb's Creek, 
Liberty, . . . 
Mansfield, . . 
Worcester, Mass 
Scranton, . . 
Fairdale, . . 
Evergreen, 
Arnot, . . . 
Arnot, . . . 
Mansfield, . . 
Mansfield, . . 
Wayland, N. Y 
Priceburg, . . 
Lamb's Creek, 
Maineslmrg, . 
Morris Run, . 
Gillett, . . . 
Port Allegany, 
Weatherly, 
Elk Run, . . 
Mansfield, . . 
Mansfield, . . 
Mansfield, . . 
Vose, .... 
Mills, .... 
Mills, . 



. Junior 

Music 

Preparatory 
. Music, Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Senior 
. Senior 

Music 

Preparatory 
, Junior 

Grad., Col. Prep'y 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Senior 

Senior 

Preparatory, Music 

Junior 

Senior 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Graduate, Scientific 

Senior 

Music, Elocution 

Senior 

Music 

Music 

Junior 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Junior 

Preparatory 

Preparatory, Music 

Junior 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Junior 

Preparatory, Music 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



I-, 



Evans, Stephen, 
Farr, Edward B 
Ferguson, Wellington H. 
Fitzpatrick, Julia, 
Ford, Clark G., 
Ford, D. H., . 
Fralic, George D. 
Fralic, Harry B., 
Fritzsche, Vesta, 
Furman, Fred J., 
Gaige, Fred H., 
Gaige, Herman Hall 
Gaige, Myra, . . 
Gallagher, Kathryn 
Garra, Margaret, . 
Gates, Maud E., , 
Gaylord, Laura E., 
Gibson, Katheryn Helen 
Gibson, Richard J., 
Gile, Norman C, . . 
Gillett, Melena M., . . 
Gilmartin, Kathrene, . 
Goldmyer, Margaret L., 
Goodrich, Nellie, . . 
Gordon, Nellie B , . . 
Gordon, Thomas, . . 
Gorton, Allie, .... 
Grabb, Mary Elizabeth, 
Gray, Alice, .... 
Gray, Mary, .... 
Griffith, Eliza Hope, . 
Griffith, Nellie, . . 
Guild, Lavina Rosetta, 
Gustin, Lulu, .... 
Gustin, Richard, . 
Hall, Delbert E., 
Hall, Hattie M., . 
Hanyen, J. Blanche 
Harer, Harriet, 



Blossburg, . . 


. Junior 


Skinner's Eddy, 


. College Preparatory 


Waverly, N. Y., 


. Preparatory 


Mansfield, . . 


. Music 


West Covington, 


. Preparatory 


West Covington, 


. Music ' 


Lamb's Creek, 


. Preparatory 


Lamb's Creek, 


. Preparatory 


Liberty, . . . 


Preparatory 


Roseville, . . 


. Junior 


Mansfield, . . 


. Graduate, Scientific 


Jackson Summit, 


. Senior, Music 


Mansfield, . . 


. Graduate, Music 


Scranton, . . . 


. Preparatory 


Hudsondale, . 


. Junior 


Mansfield, . . 


. Grad., Col. Prep'y 


Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Mansfield, . . . 


. Senior 


Mansfield, . . 


. Preparatory 


Mansfield, . . 


. Graduate, Scientific 


Mansfield, . . 


. Preparatory 


Tunkhannock, 


. Junior 


Blossburg, . . . 


. Junior 


Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Mansfield, . . . 


. Junior 


Mansfield, . . 


. Preparatory 


Canton, . . . 


Preparatory 


Herrick, . . . 


. Junior 


Mainesburg, . 


. Preparatory 


Canton, . . . 


Preparatory 


Towanda, . . 


. Senior 


Kingston, . . 


. Junior 


Hector, . . . 


Senior, Music 


East Smithfield, 


. Junior 


Millerton, . . 


. . Preparatory 


Mills, .... 


Junior 


Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Rutland, . . 


. Preparatory 


Williamsport, 


, . Junior 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



13 



Harkness, Clay Webster, . 
Harrer, Edith Elizabeth, . 

Hart, Emma, 

Hart, Harry, 

Hendricks, Helen, .... 
Heron, James D. , .... 
Heron, Kathryn Burnadette 

Hill, Herbert T. 

Hill, Anna L., 

Hillier, Lydia, 

Hinckley, Taylor C, . . . 
Hitchcock, A. Julius, . . . 
Hoard, Nellie M., . . . , 

Hodges, Sara, 

Hopkins, Mary, 

Howe, Van V., . . . . 
Hubbard, Thomas B., 

Hughes, Myrtie 

Hulslander, Frances Mildred 
Hulslander, Leah Lavinia, 
Humphrey, Harold Phelps, 
Humphrey, Victoria C, . 
Hurley, Julia Virginia, . 
Hurley, Nellie A., . . . 
Hurley, Thomas F., 
Hurr, Nellie C, . . . . 

Husted, Carl 

Husted, Harry A., . . . 
Husted, Jessie Bowen, 

Husted, Leah, 

Husted, Ray, 

Hutcheson, Margaret, 
Ingalls, Leone, .... 
Inscho, Ernest, .... 
Jackson, Margaret, . . . 

James, LeRoy, 

Jayne, Mary F. 

Jenkins, Harriet F. , 
Jenks, F. Mabel .... 



Springfield, 
East Point, 
Eleven Mile, 
Mansfield, . 
Mainesburg, 
Fall Brook, 
Morris Run, 
Shunk, . . 
Burlington, 
Mansfield, . 
Nicholson, . 
Knoxville, . 
Mansfield, . 
Mansfield, . 
Antrim, . . 
Mansfield, . 
Rutland, . . 
Mitchell's Creek 
.Burlington, 
Burlington, 
Elkland, . . 
EastSmithfield, 
Miner's Mills, 
Morris, . . . 
Fall Brook, 
Coudersport, 
Mansfield, . 
Mansfield, . 
Morris Run, 
Mansfield, . 
Mansfield, . 
Blossburg, . 
Mansfield, . 
Canoe Camp, 
Cherry Flats, 
Rutland, . . 
Tunkhannock, 
Mansfield, . . 
Cherry Creek, N 



Junior 
Senior 
Preparatory 
Preparatory 
Preparatory 
Junior 
Senior 
Preparatory 
Preparatory 
Music 
Junior 
Preparatory 
Music 
Preparatory 
Senior 

Grad., Col. Prep'y 
Junior, Elocution 
Preparatory 
Senior 
Preparatory 
College Preparatory 
Senior 
' Senior, Elocution 
Preparatory 
Junior 

Junior, Music 
Preparatory 
Junior 
Preparatory 
Music 

Graduate, Art 
Junior 
Music 
Junior 
Preparatory 
Preparatory 
Senior 
Preparatory 
Y., Senior, Music 



14 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Jenks, Mary A., 


Cherry Creek, N 


Y., Music 


Jerald, Ada H., 




. . Junior 


Johnson, Albert A., 


. . West Covington 


. Preparatory 


Johnson, George M., . 


. . Laceyville, 


. , Junior 


Johnson, Leona B., 


. Mansfield, . . 


. Music 


Jones, Agnes E., 


. Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Jones, Caroline Elizabetl 


, . Potterville, 


. Junior 


Jones, Charles C, . . 


. East Point, 


. Preparatory 


Jones, Edward N., 




. Preparatory 


Keating, J. Francis, 


. Blossburg, . . 


. Preparatory 


Keeler, John Nelson, . 


. . East Smithfield, 


. Senior 


Kelley, Lorena D., . . 


. Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Kelly, Anna R., 


Mansfield, 


. Preparatory 


Kelly, Kent, 


West Covington, 


. Preparatory 


Kelly, Mary, 


Coudersport, 


. Junior 


Kelly, May, . . 


Mansfield, 


. . Preparatory 


Kelly, Nellie G., 


Mansfield, 


. Preparatory 


Kendrick, F. Roy, . 


. Covington, 


. Preparatory, Music 


Kenyon, George T., 


. Troy, .... 


. Preparatory 


Kiefer, C. E., 


Tunkhannock, 


. Preparatory 


Kiley, Kate, 


Covington, 


. Preparatory 


Kimball, Everett E., 


. Wellsboro, 


. Preparatory 


Kingsley, Maude, . . 


. Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Kingsley, Ralph, . . 


. Mansfieldj . . 


. Preparatory 


Kilbourne, Fred, 


. Covington, 


. Preparatory 


Kohler, Lulu M., . . . 


. Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Lambert, Pauline, . . . 


. Galeton, . . 


. Junior 


Lamont, Jennie, 


Wellsboro, 


. Music 


Langdon, Maud, 


Mansfield, 


. Preparatory 


Langdon, Vesta, 


Mansfield, 


. Junior 


Latham, Dudley E., 


. Weatherly, 


. Junior 


Layman, Frank, . 


West Terry, 


. Preparatory 


Leach, Helen E. , 


. Chinchilla, 


. Grad., Scientific, Art 


Lefler, Lillian May, . . 


. Job's Corners, 


. Preparatory 


Lefler, Max R., 


Tob's Corners, 


. Junior 


Lent, Philip J., 


Mansfield, 


. Junior 


Leuthner, Joseph, . . 


. Germania, . . 


. Junior 






. College Preparatory 


Lewis, Lena Rivers, 


. Mansfield, . . 


. Graduate, Music 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH 


DISTRICT 1 5 


Lewis, Maud Hunter, . . 


. Mansfield, . . 


. Senior 


Lewis, Mina, 


Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Lillibridge, Rafa E., . . 


. Port Allegany, 


. Junior 




. Arnot, . . . . 


Preparatory 




Nelson, . . . 


Senior, Elocution 


Lownsbery, Stella Sophia, 


. Canoe Camp, 


. Senior 


Lundin, Carl, 


Blossburg, . . 


. Preparatory 




Spring Hill, . 


, Preparatory 


Lyons, Mary F., . . . . 


Olyphant, . . 


. Junior 


McCarthy, Augusta Gertrude, Miner's Mills, 


. Senior 


McClelland, Anna, . . . 


. Mansfield, . . 


. Music 


McEntee, Mae A., . . . 


Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


McGinty, James A., . . 




Junior 




. Arnot, . . . 


Preparatory 




Liberty, . . 


. Music 


Mann, Arthur L., ... 


. Mansfield, . . 


. Grad., Col. Prep'y 




. Gillett, , . . 


Preparatory 




. Gillett, . . . 


Preparatory 


Mattison, Edna, .... 


Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Mayock, Mollie, .... 


Miner's Mills, 


. Preparatory 




Mitchell's Creek 


, . Junior 


Michelfelder, Frederika H. 


, Harrison Valley 


..Senior 


Middaugh, Nellie Janet, . 


. Rising, . . . 


Junior 


Mdler, Christina, . . . 




Preparatory 


Miller, Clara Rebecca, . 


. Millerton, . . 


. Senior, Elocution 


Miller, Clara J., .... 


. Liberty, . . . 


Preparatory 


Miller, EllaE., .... 


Millerton, . . 


. Junior 


Miller, Julia Bernice, . . 


. Millerton, . . 


Prep'y, Elocution 


Mills, Edith Winnifred, . 


. Royal, . . . 


Senior 




Big Flats, N. Y. 


, . Music 


Mitchell, Margaret, . . . 


. Oswayo, . . 


. . Preparatory, Music 


Mold, Harry James, . . 


. Blossburg, . . 


. . Senior 




Chemung, N. Y 


, . Preparatory 


Morris, Archibald J., . . 


Watertown,S. Dak., College Preparatory 




Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Morris, Louis Philip, . . 


. Mansfield, . . 


. . Junior 


Morris, Margaret, . . . 


. Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Morris, Sara Rae, . . . 


. Mansfield, . . 


. Senior 


Morton, Leva E. , ... 


. Westfield, . . 


. . Preparatory, Music 



i6 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Mosher, Joseph A., 

Mott, Eva Winnifred, 

Mourhess, Bert, 

Mudge, Edith S.,' 

Muir, James N v 

Myfelt, Myrna, 

Myrick, Vena R. , . 

Neal, William J., 

Nelson, Andrew, 

Nelson, Anna A., 

Newell, Leon, 

Nichols, Anna, 

Nichols, Lena Mae, 

Northrup, Erances E., 

Nye, Margaret D., . 

Nye, Sylvene, . . . 

O'Connell, John, 

Oldroyd, Anna, . . 

Oliver, John A., . 

Ollendick, August, 

Osgood, Watson, 

Palmer, George L., 

Park, Edith May, 

Parke, Newcomb Gilbert 

Parks, Henry Joseph, 

Parsons, Emma, . . 

Passmore, George, 

Passmore, R. Helen, 

Patten, Jennie Celine, 

Patterson, Maty M., 

Patterson, Ray G., . 

Pearce, Nella, 

Perry, Earle, 

Peters, Rena, . 

Peters, Sara Josephine 

Petticrew, Lizzie, 

Phelps, Augustus T., 

Phillips, Amy B. , 

Pitts, Evangeline Bodine, 



, Mansfield, 
. Port Allegany, 
. Mansfield, . 
. Mansfield, . 
. Fall Brook, . 
. Somer's Lane, 
. Sherman, . . 
. Liberty, . . 
. Canoe Camp, 
. Canoe Camp, 
. Mansfield, . . 
. Shingle House, 

. East Smithfield 

. Clark's Green 
. Rutland, 

. Rutland, . 

. West Terry, 

. Rutland, 

. Tunkhannock 

. Throop, . . 

. Mansfield, 

. Sullivan, 

. Osborn, N. " 

. Montrose, 

. Plains, . . 

. Coudersport, 

. Mansfield, 

. Carbondale, 

. Olyphant, . 

. Arnot, . . 
East Lemon, 
Coudersport, 
Shingle House 
Osceola, 
Fall Brook, 
Tioga, . . 
East Smithfield 
Mansfield, . 
Mansfield, 



. Junior 

. Senior, Music 

. Preparatory 

. Junior 

. Grad., Col. Prep'y 

. Preparatory 

. Preparatory 

. Preparatory 

. Junior 

. Junior 

. Preparatory 

. Preparatory, Music 

. Junior 

. Preparatory 

. Preparatory 

. Junior 

. Preparatory 

. Preparatory 

. Preparatory 

. Senior 

. Preparatory 

. Junior 

. Junior 

. Junior 

. Senior 

. Preparatory 

. Preparatory 

. Senior 

. Senior 

, Preparatory 

. Preparatory 

. Preparatory, Music 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Senior, Elo., Music 

Music 

College Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Senior 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



17 



Pitts, Josephine M., 
Piatt, James E , . . 
Powers, Ray M., . . 
Powers, Vernie E., . 
Purcell, Elizabeth, . 
Raker, Ada M., . . 
Randall, Burdette F., 
Rawson, Edna Loulu, 
Reap, Michael H., . 
Reese, Eva, .... 
Reese, Leon, . . . 
Reynolds, Clara B., 
Reynolds, Effie Pauline 
Reynolds, W. H., . 
Rice, Nettie A., . . 
Richards, Alice, . . 
Richmond, BertW., 
Ridge, S. Adelbert, 
Robbins, Archibald, 
Robbins, Ida, . . . 
Robbins, Jessie E., . 
Robertson, Mrs. G. C 
Rogers, Louise May, 
Rogers, William, 
Ross, Ethel, . . . 
Roupp, Dayton G., 
Russell, Leon J., 
Ryon, Neva, . . . 
Sampson, Caroline, . 
Saxe, Edward A., 
Saxton, George Adolph 
Schmouder, Neta, 
Schneider, Henry, . 
Shamalia, Mary Lowe, 
Shattuck, Jessie, . . 
Shaw, Ethel, . . . 
Shaw, M. Jennie, 
Shaw, Nellie A., . . 
Shedden, Elwin, . . 



us, 



Mansfield, 


. . Preparatory 


Laceyville, 


. . Preparatory 


Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Mansfield, . . 


. Preparatory 


Arnot, . . . 


. Preparatory 


Liberty, . . . 


. Preparatory 


Canton, . . . 


. Junior 


Tioga, .... 


. Senior 


Pittston, . . 


. . Junior 


Mansfield, . . 


. Music 


Mansfield, . . 


. Music 


Troy, .... 


. Junior 


Tunkhannock, 


. Junior 


Tunkhannock, 


. Preparatory 


East Charleston, 


. Junior 


Blossburg, . . 


. Senior 


Mansfield, . . . 


. Senior 


Covington, 


. Junior 


Mainesburg, . 


. Preparatory 


Mansfield, . . 


. Graduate, Music 


Mainesburg, . 


. Music 


Mansfield, . . 


. Music 


Elkland, . . 


. Senior 


Elkland, . ; 


. Senior, Music 


Mills, . . . 


. Junior 


East Point, 


. Preparatory 


Rome, . . . 


. Junior 


Nauvoo, . . 


. Preparatory 


Covington, 


. Preparatory 


Wilmot, . . . 


. Junior 


Granville Centn 


;, . Senior 


Nauvoo, . . 


. Preparatory 


White Mills, . 


. Junior 


Lambertville, N 


J., Senior 


Mansfield, . . 


. Preparatory 


Mansfield, . . . 


. Preparatory 


Mansfield, . . 


. Junior 


Mansfield, . . . 


. Senior 


Roaring Branch, 


. Junior 



i8 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



Sheiye, Ola Q., . . ... Jobs Corners, 

Sheldon, Fanny, Mansfield, 

Sheldon, Mary L., . . . . Hebron, 

Shepard, Ralph, Mansfield, 

Shepherd, Cora Anna, . . Somers Lane, 
Sherman, Alan F., . . . . Pine City, N. 
Sherwood, Jennie Elizabeth, Mansfield, 
Sherwood, Julia Floy, .. . Mansfield, 
Sherwood, Lola Inez, . . . Mansfield, 
Sherwood, Mattie Julia, . . Mansfield, 
Shifler, Charles C, . . . . West Nicholso 

Shook, Gerdon A. Stub, 

Shove, Frances Rebecca, . Wellsboro, 
Shutts, Charles, ...... Genesee, 

Simms, Bertha G., . . . Scranton, 
Simpson, Richard, ... Arnot, 
Smith, Elizabeth Margaret, Fairdale, 

Smith, Ethel, Oswayo, 

Smith, Ethel M., .... Sherman, 

Smith, Ernest, ....... Mansfield, 

Smith, Henry B., . . . .Mansfield, 

Smith, Iva, Big Pond, 

Smith, Lena Emily, . . . Mansfield, 

Smith, L. H., Shingle House 

Smith, Lewis M., .... Tioga, 

Smith, Marie, Mansfield, 

Smith, Susie H., Mansfield, 

Snyder, Courtney Niles, . . Nicholson, 
Soete, Theresa Veronica, . Honesdale, 
Somerville, Alexander, . . Fall Brook, 

Soper, Rexford, Rutland, 

Soper, Ross W. , Columbia X Roads 

Spencer, J. Wright, . . . Franklindale, 

Squier, Alice F., West Nicholson, 

Squier, Clarence C, ... West Nicholson, 

Squier, Paul E., West Nicholson, 

Squire, May Rutland 

Stark, Ethel G., Nicholson, 

Stark, Lee P., Tunkhannock, 



Senior 
Music 

Preparatory 
. Preparatory 
Senior 
Preparatory 
. Senior 
Senior 
Junior 
Senior 

Preparatory, Music 
Junior 
Junior 
Preparatory 
Preparatory 
Junior 
Senior 

Preparatory, Music 
Junior 
Junior 
Preparatory 
Music 
Junior 

Grad., Music, Elo. 
Preparatory 
Preparatory 
Preparatory 
Senior 
Senior 
Senior 
Junior 
Preparatory 
Junior 
Preparatory 
Senior, Elocution 
Preparatory 
Preparatory 
Junior 
Col. Prep'y, Elocu. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



J 9 



Stark, Percy Spencer, . 
Stevens, Clella Lucile, 
Stevenson, Margaret Sturrock 
Stewart, Clarence Wilbur, 
Storer, Susie A., . . . 
Storms, Carolyn, . . . 

Stout, Ina E. 

Strange, John Cooley, 
Stratton, Raymond J., 
Strong, Harriette L. , . 
Strong, Jennie Adams, 
Stull, Myrtle, .... 
Stull, Ray T., . . . . 
Sutton, Ernest, . . . 
Sutton, George, . . . 
Sutton, Jennie Lee, 
Sweeley, Nelle M., . . 
Taylor, Bayard, . . . 
Taylor, Belva Lockwood 
Taylor, Floyd H., . . 
Taylor, Lena B., . . . 
Taylor, Mae R, . . 
Taylor, Minnie, . . . 
Thatcher, Anna L. , 
Thomas, Margaret, . . 
Thomas, Philip W., 
Thompson, James H., 
Thurston, Florence, 
Tiffany, Agnes, . . . 
Tomlinson, Leaphy A., 

Toye, Peter 

Tubbs, Warren, . . . 
Tyrrell, Fayette, . . . 
Updyke, Fannie Bell, . 
Upham, Katharine, 
Valentine, LenaB., 
VanNess, Celia Evelina, 
VanNess, Susie, . . . 
VanNorman, Karl F. , . 



. Tunkhannock, . 
. Harrison Valley, 
, Morris Run, . 
. Big Flats, N. Y 
. Lanesboro, 
. Waverly, N. Y. 
. Rutland, . . 
. Mansfield, . . 
. Blossburg, . . 
. Springfield, 
. Springfield, 
. Farmer's Valley, 
. Elkland, . . 
. Sullivan, . . 
. Sunderlinville, 
. Sunderlinville, 
. Rutland, . . 
. Granville Centre 
. South Auburn, 
. South Auburn, 
. Mansfield, . . 
. Mansfield, . . 
. Westfield, . . 
. Montrose, . . 
. Wilkes Barre, 
. Neath, . . . 
. Mansfield, . . 
. Bernice, . . 
. Montrose, . . 
. Mansfield, . . 
. Pittston, . . 
. Osceola, . . 
. Neath, . . . 
. Jackson Summit 
. Neath, . . . 
. West Nicholson, 
. Lamb's Creek, 
. Mansfield, . . 
. Mansfield, . . 



Senior 

Junior, Elocution 

Senior 

Senior, Elocution 

Junior 

Junior 

Preparatory 

Senior 

College Preparatory 

Graduate, Music 

Senior 

Preparatory 

College Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Senior 

Unclassified 

Preparatory 

Prqmratory, Music 

Preparatory, Music 

Junior 

Junior 

College Preparatory 

Junior, Elocution 

Junior 

Junior, Music 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Col. Prep'y, EIocu. 

Junior 

Graduate, Music, Art 

Music, Art 

Junior 

Junior 

Music 

Music 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Vaughn, Lena S< , Covington, . . 

Voorhees, Estella Gertrude, Mansfield, . . . 
Walbridge, Maud, .... Wellsboro, . . 
Wagner, Eldy H., . . . . Academy Corners 
Walker, Fannie M., ... Eleven Mile, 
Wallace, Nellie H., ... Susquehanna 
Walsh, Katie A., .... Olyphant, . 
Wandall, Elizabeth Catherine, Mehoopany, 

Watkins, Nellie, Blossburg, . 

Watrous, Louise E., ... Montrose, . 

Watson, D. E., Rutland, 

Watson, Edward, .... Landrus, 

Webster, Clara, Mainesburg, 

Webster, Edith, Ellisburg, . 

Webster, Ernest George, . Mainesburg, 
Webster, Harry E., . . . Morris, . . 

Webster, Mark A. Mainesburg, 

Welch, Bertha N., ... . Mainesburg, 

Welfiing, R. O., Germania, . 

Wells, Verne, Mansfield, . 

Werline, Edith Phcebe, . . Liberty, . . 

Wetmore, Lyman Mansfield, . 

Wetmore, Pearl A Mansfield, . 

Wetsel, Marie B., .... Morris Run, 

Wheeler, Lydia, Mansfield, . 

Wheeler, Walter N. , . . .Rutland, . 
White, A. Grace, .... Mansfield, . 
Williams, Nan M. , . . . . Mainesburg, 
Williams, Sylvester E., . . Olyphant, . 

Wilson, Agnes, Little Marsh, 

Wilson, Belle, Mansfield, , 

Wilson, Blanche T., ... Mansfield, . 

Wilson, Lewis, Mansfield, . 

Winans, Laura Mae, . . . Meshoppen, 

Wolcott, Victor, Austin, . . 

Youmans, Mark, Covington, 

Zepp, Katie E., Germania . 

Zimmer, Mabel, Mansfield, . 

Fike, Inez B., Dumdaff, . 

Total number of Students , . , . 



. Music 
. Senior 
. Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 
. Junior 
. Preparatory 
. Senior 
. Preparatory 
. Grad., Col. Prep' y,M 
. Music 
. Junior 

. Preparatory, Music 
, Preparatory 
. Senior 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Preparatory 

Grad., Elocution 

Preparatory 

Senior 
, Preparatory 

Preparatory 
. Preparatory, Music 

Music 

Preparatory 
. Preparatory 

Preparatory, Art 
, Junior 

Senior, Music 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Junior 

Preparatory 

Preparatory 

Senior 

Preparatory 

Senior 



5°3 



STATE 'NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



Four Courses of Study are provided for the Normal Schools ;of the State of Penn- 
sylvania, as follows: Elementary Course, Regular Normal Course, Scientific Course, 
Advanced Normal Course. 

ELEMENTARY COURSE. 

Preparatory Studies. 

Language.— Orthography; Reading; Grammar; first and second terms. 
Mathematics.— Arithmetic, first and second terms. 
Natural Science. -Nature Study; physiology and Hygiene. 
. Historical Science— Geography, political and physical; History of the United 

Stclt6S 

The Arts— Penmanship, sufficient to he able to explain some approved system, 
writing to he submitted to the Board of Examiners; Book-keeping, single entry includ- 
ing a knowledge of common business papers, and a daily exercise for at least seven 
weeks; Vocal Music, elementary principles and attendance upon daily exercises for at 
least twelve weeks. 

Physical Culture. 

Junior Year. 

PEDAGOGICS.— School Management; Method of Teaching the Common Branches. 
Language— English Grammar completed; Latin, sufficient for the introduction of 
Caesar. 

Mathematics.— Arithmetic completed; Elementary Algebra. 

Natural Science.— Botany. 

Historical Science.— Civil Government. 

The arts— Drawing, a daily exercise for at least twenty -four weeks, work tojbe 

submitted to the Board of Examiners. 
Physical Culture. 

Senior Year. 

Pedagogics— Psychology; Methods of Teaching the Common Branches; History of 
Education; Model School Work, at least forty weeks of actual teaching daily during 
one period of not less than forty-fiye minutes; a Thesis on professional subject. 

Language— Rhetoric and Composition: English Literature, at least twelve weeks' 
work, including the thorough study of four English classics; Latin, Caesar, through the 
Helvetian war. 

Mathematics.— Plane Geometry. 

Natural Science.— Elementary Natural Philosophy. 

Historical Science.— General History. 

The arts.— Elocutionary exercis S3 in connection with the study of English Litera- 
ture; Manual Training. 

Physical Culture. 



2 2 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 

REGULAR NORMAL COURSE. 

[Three Years.] 

[This course includes the studies of the Elementary Course, and the following 
branches: a full equivalent will be accepted for any of the text books named in this 
course.] 

Pedagogics— Advanced Psychology; Moral Science; Philosophy of Education; 
Methods of Teaching; Practic- of Teaching; 1 e lagogical Works: Foebel, Education of 
Man; Quick, Educational Reformers; Fitch, Lectures on Teaching; School Apparatus; 
School Supervision; Discussion of Manual Training; Physical Culture, etc. 

Mathematics— Solid Geometry; Plane and Analytical Trigonometry; Surveying. 

Language— Latin, Caesar, three books; Virgil's .Eneid, three books; Cicero, three 
orations. 

Natural Science— Chemistry, including Chemistry of Soils; Zoology, including 
Entomology; Geology. 

Literature.— Higher Literature. English and American, including a study of at 
least four classics. 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

[Four Years.] 

[This course includes the studies of the Regular Normal Course and the following 
branches: I 

Pedagogics. -Logic: Course of Professional Reading selected from regular or 
advanced Normal Course; a thesis on a professional subject. 

LANGUAGE.-Latin, three books of Virgil's .Eneid; three orations of Cicero, or a full 
equivalent. (An equivalent of Greek, German or French will be accepted for any of the 
following studies: Virgil, Cicero. Higher Algebra, Spherical Trigonometry, Surveying, 
Analytical Geometry, Calculus, Mathematical Natural Philosophy and Mathematical 
Astronomy, and an equivalent in Latin and advanced work in Natural Science for any 
of the foregoing mathematical studies.) 

Mathematics.— Higher Algebra; Spherical Trigonometry and Surveying, with use 
of instruments; Analytical Geometry; Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Natural Science.— Higher Natural Philosophy; Astronomy, Descriptive and Math- 
ematical. 

Historical Science— English History; Grecian History; Roman History. 

ADVANCED NORMAL COURSE. 

[Five Years.] 

[This course includes the studies of the Scientitlc Course, and one year's additional 
work in Pedagogics, as follows: A full equivalent will be accepted for any of the text- 
books in the course.] 

Psychology. —James, advanced course. 

Laurie's Institutes of Education; Kern's Outline of Podagogy; Herbart's Science or 
Education; Spencer's Education: Rosmini's Method in Education; Davidson's Educa- 
tion of trie Greek People. 

Discussion of Methods and Objeots of Leading Educators; Froebel, Pestalozzi, Dr. 
Arnold, Horace Mann and others. 

Discussion of Educational Theories. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



23 



Education in the United States; Education in Pennsylvania, Wickersham; General 
Survey of History of Public Education in Germany, France, and England. 

Advanced work in Language, Mathematics, Natural Science, etc., may be taken at 
the option of the student. 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSES. 

[These courses have been instituted by this school for the benefit of students who 
desire to pursue a course of study at the college or university, and they require from 
one to two years after comoleting the Elementary Course. Students who complete 
these courses are admitted without examination, to Cornell University, Lafayette Col- 
lege, Bucknell University, and Pennsylvania State College.] 

I. Preparatory to a Classical Course. 
English.— Spelling; Reading; English Grammar and Composition; Rhetoric. 
History— History of the United States; Outlines of Roman History; Outlines of 
Grecian History. 

Orography.— Political and Physical Geography complete; Ancient Geography. 
Physiology.— Martin's Text Book complete, or the equivalent. 
Mathematics.— Arithmetic; Algebra through Quadratics; Plane Geometry. 
LATiN.-Latin Grammar and Reader; Cesar's Commentaries, four books; Cicero's 
Orations, four against Cataline, and "Pro Arehia;" Virgil's .Eneid, six books; Latin 
Prose Composition. 

Greek— Greek Grammar and Reader; Xenophon's Anabasis, four books; Homer's 
Iliad, three books; Greek Prose Composition. 

J J. Preparatory to a Latin Scientific Course. 
This c"tirse is the same as the Classical Course, except that forGreek, German and, 
Elementary Physics are substituted. 

JJ1. Preparatory to a Technical Course. 
English.— Spelling; Reading; English Grammar and Composition; Rhetoric. 
History.— History of the United States; General History. 
Geography.— Political and Physical Geography complete. 
Physiology. -Martin's Text Book complete, or the equivalent. 
Mathematics.— Arithmetic; Algebra complete; Plane and Solid Geometry; Plane; 
and Spherical Trigonometry. 

German. -German Grammar and Reader; William Tell; Marie Stuart. 



COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

History of Agriculture; care and management of live stock; cattle feeding; stock 
breeding; dairying, composition and production of milk, butter and cheese; poultry 
culture; the more common diseases of farm animals, their treatment and prevention; 
soils; tillage and farm tool-i: drainage and irrigation; farm manures and commercial 
fertilizers, their comparative value and adaptation to various crops; fruit culture; 
vegetable gardening; insects and diseases injurious to farm crops, with methods of 
treatment and prevention; nature study, embracing field-work for observation and 
study of common objects, such as stones, twigs, leaves, flowers, birds, insects, and the 
like. 



■ 



24 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



COURSE IN ART. 

Elementary and Freehand Drawing is tauglit as a regular branch in the Elemen- 
tary Course. 

Special Art Classes. 

FIRST YEAR. 
Freehand drawing with lead pencil or charcoal from the type solids, and objects 
based on them. Designs in relief from cast; fragments of the antique from cast; 
painting in monochrome from still life; painting of flowers and landscapes from the 
flat in oil and water colors; pen and ink work from objects and copies; sketching from 
nature in the spring; sketching from costumed life once a week. 

SECOND YEAR. 
Freehand drawing of heads from the antique, with lead pencil or charcoal; paint- 
ing of figures from the flat in oil and water colors; pen and ink work from objects; 
sketching from costumed life; sketching from nature in the fall and spring. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Freehand drawing of the full length figure from the antique; more advanced work 
in painting from still life in oil and water colors; sketching from costumed life in pen 
and ink: elementary work in designing wall paper, book covers, etc.; painting from 
nature in oil and water colors; illustrating. 

Beside the studies here named, every candidate for graduation in this course must 
pass satisfactory examinations in the subjects of the Preparatory and Junior classes 
of the Elementary Course or their equivalent, with the exception of book-keeping. 
Algebra, and Latin. German may be substituted for Civil Government, and for a part 
of the course in Arithmetic. 

This course is laid out on the basis of three years' time, with two lessons a week, 
for a student of ordinary talent and with reasonable application. Students who show 
more than ordinary talent or who increase the number of lessons per week, may 
shorten the time, as advancement is determined by what is really accomplished rather 
than by the time spent. 

For a more detailed account of the methods employed in this department, see 
under Material and Methods of Instruction. 

COURSES IN MUSIC. 

There are three courses in music : The course in Piano, the course in Violin, and 
the course in Singing. Students may receive a diploma on completing any course. 

Studies Required in all the Courses. 

The study of Harmony, the History of Music, and practice In readingmusic at sight 
are required in all the courses. Also, before graduation from either course, the student 
must pass satisfactory examinations in the subjects of the Preparatory and Junior 
Classes of the Elementary Course, with the exception of Book-keeping, Algebra, and 
Latin. German may be substituted for Civil Government and for a part of the course 
In Arithmetic. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



2 5 



Studies Required in Each Course. 

Beside the studies named as required in all the courses, the following studies, or 
their full equivalent, will he required in each course for graduation. These courses are 
laid out upon the basis of three years' time, with two lessons a week, for a student of 
ordinary talent and with reasonable application 

To students who show more than ordinary capacity for improvement, the length of 
time or the number of lesions may be reduced, as students will be advanced and grad- 
uated according to what they accomplish rather than to the number of lessons taken. 
Advancement in the course will be determined in a large degree by the ability and pro- 
gress shown at the weekly recitals, and at tho more public recitals at the close of each 
half term. A record will be kept of the merits of every performance on these occasions, 
as well as of all examinations in theory. Graduation will depend upon these records 
and upon tbe character and conduct of the candidate. 

The course in Vocal Music required in the Junior Class will be free of charge to stu- 
dents of music as to other students. 

In cases of unavoidable absence, from sickness or other cause, lessons will be made 
up, if the teacher is notified beforehand. 

Course in Piano. 

FIRST YEAR. 
Czerny, beginning exercises ; Matthews' Graded Studies, books one, two, and 
three; hand shaping; exercises with clavier; Mason's Touch and Technic ; easy 
pieces memorized : easy sonatas and pieces by Clementi and Kullak ; scale work. 

SECOND YEAR. 
Matthews' Graded Studies, books four, five, and six; Mason's Touch and Technic : 
Bach ; easy preludes; clavier work ; ensemble playing ; scales and arpeggios ; easy 
sonatas and pieces by Hadyn, Mozart and others ; pieces memorized ; Mendelssohn ; 
Haydn; easy pieces by Schumann. 

THIRD YEAR 

Matthews' Graded Studies, books seven, eight, and nine ; Clementi ; studies in 
Bach; Chopin and Kullak ; Schumann; Mendelssohn; Beethoven sonatas memorized. 

Course in Singing. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Principles of breathing, as applied to tone production and art of vocalization, to be 

continued through the course according to the requirements of individuals. Ear 

training ; sight reading ; tone placing ; exercises from Concone ; Vaccai ; chorus 

work ; easy songs. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Application of the foregoing work to all needs in the second year. Music in this 
year will be selected with special regard to the necessity of employing particular 
points in the voice management. Exercises from Marchesi, and Bordogni ; ensemble 
singing ; balads memorized ; frequent appearance at the Wednesday evening recitals. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Study of oratorios. German and Italian songs ; advanced technical songs ; Oper- 
atic music ; chorus work. 



26 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 

For graduation from this course the first year of the course in piano or the equiva- 
lent will be required. 

Course in Violin. 

FIRST YEAR. 
Easy exercises and pieces in first position ; Weiss' Method; Weiss' easy pieces for 
violin and piano ; work in second and third positions started at close of year. 

SECOND YEAR. 
Work in second and third positions ; scale work ; pieces memorized ; Wolfhardt, 
and Kayser studies; violin duos and trios. 

THIRD YEAR. 
Ferdinand David's advanced method ; studies by Mazas ; Kreutzer ; violin con- 
certos ; pieces by De Beriot, Wieniawski ; duo and quartette playing. 

For a more detailed account of the methods of instruction employed in this de- 
partment, see under Material and Methods of Instruction. 

Course in the Model School. 

For a description of the course in the Model School, see under Material and Methods 
tof Instruction. 

MATERIAL AND METHODS OF INSTRUCTION. 

The aim of the Normal School is to furnish competent teachers for the public 
schools of the State. The mental equipment of a teacher consists of (1) knowledge of 
the subject matter to be taught, (2) knowledge of the laws of mental action, and (:■)) 
iknowledge of those methods of imparting instruction and of moving the will which are 
In most complete harmony with the laws of metal action ; this last knowledge may be 
■either theoretical or practical. With the successful teacher it is both. 

In this school the student receives his knowledge of subject matter in his daily 
:study and recitations ; he acquires an elementary knowledge of the laws of mentai 
action by the study of psychology. In order to supply him with a theoretical know- 
ledge of the best methods of imparting instruction and of moving the will, we give 
regular instruction in Methods and School Economy, and History of Education. 
Finally, to furnish him, as far as possible, with the needed practical skill, we intro- 
duce the senior to the work of actual teaching in the Model School. 

DEPARTMENT OF PEDAGOGY. 
Psychology. 

Two recitation periods, weekly, of forty-five minutes each, during the fall and 
winter terms, are required of the senior class for Psychology. 

The aim is to present the fundamental principles of the science in a manner so 
simple that the student can understand them, and in so practical a light that he may 
see their application in methods. 

The w ork consists of lectures on the nervous system and special senses ; the study 
of the intellect, the sensibilities, and the will with their relation to each other ; the 
analysis of the intellect, observing the natural order of development ; the special 
study of the intellectual faculties, with their relations to the sensibilities and the will ; 
instinct, reflex action, and habit. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 27 

History of Education. 

Three recitation periods, weekly, of forty-five minutes each, during the spring 
term, are required of the senior class for the History of Education. 

The aim is to acquaint the student with the origin and development of the theories 
and methods which he has adopted, to awaken in him an interest in the personal his- 
tory and character of the great educators of the past, and, in general, to give him 
more intelligence and a deeper interest In matters pertaining to his profession. 

The work consists of a study of selections from Compayre's History of Pedagogy 
and lectures on the History of Education in America. 

Logic. 

Two recitation periods, weekly, of forty-five minutes each, for one-half term 
are required of the graduate classes for Logic. 

The aim is to acquaint the student with the exact use of terms, the classification 
of propositions, the rules of the syllogism and the different kinds of reasoning. 

Moral Science. 

Two recitation periods, weekly, of forty-five minutes each, for one term are re- 
quired of the graduate classes for Moral Science. 

The aim is to study some of the most prominent theories of different philosophers 
in regard to the standard of ethics, the psychological basis of these theories, and to 
consider a rational system of practical Ethics. Instruction is given hy lectures. 

S. H. ALBRO, Instructor. 

Teaching. 

THKORY. 

Two recitation periods, weekly, of forty-five minutes each, during the year, are 
required of the senior class for Methods. 

The aim is to discuss the best methods of teaching each of the branches taught in • 
common schools, and to discover the psycological basis of the methods recommended. 
This course in Methods is designed to he the study of applied psychology, and-at the 
same time, a preparation for the duties of the schoolroom. 

Three recitation periods, weekly, of forty-five minutes each,during the whole year, 
are required of the Junior class for Methods and School Economy. 

The aim is to furnish students who may teach school before entering the senior 
class with such an empirical knowledge of methods, and such practical hints in regard 
to the management of a school, as he is most in need of as a preparation for his work. 

PRACTICE. 

The Model School comprises the public school of the town. It is divided into eleven 
grades, and embraces Primary, intermediate. Grammar, and Academic studies. 

Teaching in this school gives our students an opportunity to put into practice the 
theory and methods of instruction received in the course of professional work. 

Forty weeks or more of practice work is required of each senior, who does 
his work under the constant direction of the critic teachers of this department. The 
student teachers meet with the critic teachers to hear criticisms on their work. Indi- 
vidual criticisms are made and suggestions offered as needed. A single term of this 
practice will do more for a student teacher than years of schoolroom work without 
advice or criticism. 



28 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Each student teacher is also appointed critic for a definite period of time. A 
written report of his observations is then handed to the critic teachers for inspection, 
and whatever is particularly worthy of note, or subject to criticism, is afterward dis- 
cussed before the class. 

The methods, the language, power of securing and holding attention, discipline, 
manner and teaching power, are noted and errors criticised. 

Earnest effort is made to impress the fact that a poor disciplinarian cannot succeed 
in the schoolroom, and every principle relating to discipline is seriously and carefully 
discussed. During the year there are senior class exhibitions of teaching, after which 
each student has an opportunity to make criticisms or ask advice. 

The Work of the Model School. 

[The work here explained applies only to the first nine grades of the Model School. 
The course for the tenth and eleventh grades is identical with that of the Preparatory 
and Junior years of the Elementary Normal course, explained elsewhere.] 

Reading. 

FIRST GRADE— FALL TERM. 
The work of this term is based upon conversational lessons given upon objects. 
These lessons serve as a means of securing free expression of the child's thoughts by 
himself, also as material for reading. Psychological order of work: object pre- 
sented, thought awakened by object, expression of thought orally, recognition of writ 
ten expression, expression in reading from board. Number of words taught from 350 
to 400. 

WINTER TERM. 

Transposition from script to print, from blackboard to book. Swinton's Primer 
read once. Cyr's Primer begun. Blackboard work continued. 

SPRING TERM. 

Cyr's Primer completed. Swinton's First Reader read once. Reading from board, 
nature quotations for the month, short poems and songs familiar to the child. 

For those children who are under school age, and for those who enter late in the 
year, a class is organized which does not come under the name of first grade, but which 
is more properly called our Kindergarten Class. The work given to this class of chil- 
dren is in the same line as that of the first grade. The kindergarten material is applied 
in carrying out this work, and a good foundation is laid for entering upon regular 
school work. 

SECOND GRADE-FALL TERM. 

Review first Grade books. Reading from black-board short poems and stories. 

WINTER TERM. 
Headers:— "Our Little Book for Little Folks" read once. Cyr's First Reader read 
once Blackboard work continued. 

. SPRING TERM. 
Readers:— "Some of Our Friends." Cyr's First Reader read second time. Black- 
board work continued. 

THIRD GRADE-FALL TERM. 

Review second grade books. Nature Reader, "All the Year Round," Part I, 
Autumn. In connection with the Thanksgiving thought, "The Landing of the Pilgrims" 
by Mrs. Hemans, studied and read from the board. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL— FIFTH DISTRICT 



29 



WINTER TERM. 

and Lincoln, selections are read from the hoard. 

SPRING TERM. 
Nature Reader-All the Year Round,. Part III. Spring. Swinton's Second Reader 
read one" Spring poems and nature citations read from the hoard and commuted. 
FOURTH URADE-FALL TERM. 
Review Third Grade hooks. Reader-Stories of Birdland. b«nH tlon wtth 
the Mgiving thought, selections from Mites Standish studied and read from the 
hoard. WINTER TERM. 

Cyr's Third Reader. Robinson Crusoe. Christmas poems for blackboard work. 

J ' SPRING TERM. 

Stories of the Red Children. Our Friends in Feathers and Furs. 

FIFTH GRADE-FALL TERM. 
The work in this grade shall begin with Swinton's Third Reader Wings ; and Fms 
hftins introduced as supplementary reading during the latter part of the term 

The a m n thts grade, is to cultivate facility in the recognition of written nought^ 
clear enu™iao, ami an appreciation of what may be learned by reading. An eflort 
t mad! Z 'cumvate a love for the best literature of the grade, and to strengthen the 

deS puPils e are tau-ht to use the dictionary for pronunciation and definition of words. 
Wit^his in'iew dai,y drills in phonetic analysis and diacritical markings are given. 

WIN PER TERM. 
The work of the previous term continued. 

SPRING TERM. 
Leaves from Nature's Story Book. Vol. I, used as reader. 

SIXTH GRADE. 
Work of Fifth continued, using Swlnton'a Third Reader. 
Leaves from Nature's Story Book, Vol. II. 
American History Stories. (Pratt). 

SEVENTH GRADE. 
The dictionary work is extended, pupils being taught to use all departments, and 
regular study of the work given. 

Phonetic drills and diacritical markings continued. TO „ iat , ml nf what is 

The effort to increase the love for good literature, and an appreciation ot what is 
worth reading is made throughout the course ._,«_.„„ uu 

Books used in this grade are Swinton's Fourth Reader, Beginner s American His- 
tory (Montgomery), How to Keep Well (Blaisdell). 

EIGHTH GRADE. 
Method of seventh grade continued, using Swinton's Fourth Reader, Barnes' Pri- 
mary History, Story of the Romans. 

NINTH GRADE-FALL AND WINTER TERMS. 
Swinton's Fifth Reader. Story of the English. 
SPRING TERM. 

fn this term a more critical study of the work is made, and a more thorough apprecia- 
tion of the beauty of poetic expression is sought for. 



3° 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Spelling. 
FIKST GRADE. 
No spelling is required during the first term. For winter and spring terms words 
most familiar to the child in his reading and language lessons are chosen for spelling 
Methods-Children dictate the spelling of words for teacher to write. Teacher pro- 
nounces words, children spell orally, and put into sentences. Teacher spells words taken 
from the reading lessons, children pronounce after teacher spells. An exercise in writ- 
ten spelling, and a short drill in phonics and in the marking of words is given each day 
i SECOND GRADE. 
Words selected from other studies of the class, spelled phonetically and written - 
Special attention is given to the teaching and use of the diacritical marks 

THIRD AND FOURTH GRADES. 
Same plan adopted as in second grade. From ten to fifteen words given for a les- 
son, every fifth lesson a review. Special attention given to care and neatness in writing 
In all grades above the fourth grade the spelling book is used. Careful attention 
is also given to spelling in all other subjects. 

FIFTH GRADE-FIRST TERM. 
Merrill's Word and Sentence Book to lesson 30, inclusive. The written method is 
used with occasional oral exercises. All dictation exercises are read by the teacher 
and carefully written by the pupil. New words are noted of which the meaning is 
taught. Particular attention is given to neat and legible penmanship Every fifth les 
son is a review. Pupils are drilled in the diacritical markmgs of letters and instructed 
in the use of the dictionary. Competitive exercises are encouraged. 

SECOND TERM. 
Merrill's Speller to lesson TO. inclusive. 

THIRD TERM. 
Merrill's Speller to lesson 90. inclusive. Also a general review from the first of the 

SIXTH GRADE.-FIRST TERM. 
Merrill's Speller from the beginning of the book to lesson 50, inclusive. 

SECOND TERM. 
Merrill's Speller from lesson SO to lesson 80. inclusive. 

THIRD TERM. 
Merrill's Speller from lesson 80 to Part II. 

SEVENTH GRADE-FIRST TERM. 
Merrill's Speller to lesson 60. 

SECOND TERM. 
Merrill's Speller from lesson 60 to Part II. 

THIRD TERM. 
Merrill's Speller from Part II to lesson 170. 

EIGHTH GRADE-FIRST TERM. 
Merrill's Speller from the beginning to Part II. 

SECOND TERM. 
Merrill's Speller from Part II to lesson 180. 

THIRD TERM. 
Merrill's Speller from lesson 180 to Part III. 

NINTH GRADE-FIRST TERM. 
Merrill's Speller to Part II. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



31 



SECOND TERM. 
Merrill's Speller from Part II to Part III. 

THIRD TERM. 
Merrill's Speller from Part III to Part IV. 

Writing. 
FIRST GRADE. 
Copv work only. 

Pupils are taught to copy letters, words, short sentences and their own names from 
blackboard. 

Quincy paper is used, and correct spacing taught from the first. 

An effort is made to teach the children to keep good position, and to hold the pencil 

lightly and easily. 

6 SECOND GRADE. 

Drill on formation of letters. 

Words, sentences, and paragraphs copied from board. 

Method as in First Grade. 

THIRD AND FOURTH GRADES. 
Copying from blackboard, on Quincy paper, letters, words, sentences, paragraphs, 
and stanzas of poetry. 

Attention is given to position and to manner of holding the pencil. 
Neat, open, legible work is aimed at. 

FIFTH GRADE— FIRST TERM. 
The lead pencil is used during this term. Considerable attention is given to free- 
dom of movement, and the correct position of the body and manner of holding the 
pencil. The greater part of the work this term consists in movement exercises. Let- 
ters forming a basis for such exercises are given, as 0, a, u, m, 1, O, W, etc. 

SECOND TERM. 
Pupils will now be given pen and ink. Spencerian Writing Book No. 1 is used. 
Movement exercises. All new letters written on the board and explained each day. 
SIXTH GRADE— FIRST TERM. 
As in the preceding grade a considerable part of the time is devoted to exercises to 
enable the pupils to secure a free and easy movement, and a correct position of body. 
Spencerian Writing Book No. 2 to page 8. 

SECOND TERM. 
Spencerian Writing Book No. 2, completed. Movement exercises. Analysis of letters 

introduced. SEVENTH GRADE-FIRST TERM. 

Movement exercises. All new letters written in spaces and analyzed. Spencerian 

Writing Book No. 8 to page 10. 

SECOND TERM. 

A part of the period each day is devoted to writing all new letters in spaces and 
.analyzing the same. Movement exercises. Spencerian Writing Book completed. 
EIGHTH GRADE— FIRST TERM. 
This year greater attention is given to analysis of letters. Pupils are required to 
rule paper and make letters explained from the black board, then to make them without 
spaces, using a free and easy movement. Spencerian Writing Book No. 4 to page 10. 

SECOND TERM. 
Movement exercises and analysis of letters as in preceding term. Spencerian Writ- 
ing Book No. 4, completed. 



3 2 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



NINTH GRADE— FIRST TERM. 
Spencerian Writing Book No. 5 to page 10. Method as In preceding grade. 

SECOND TERM. 
Spencerian Writing Book No. 5, completed. 

English. 

FIRST GRADE-FALL TERM. 

1. Oral work. Conversation Lessons. Accustom children to talk freely and with- 
out hesitation. Lead them to use sentences describing actions, as I can run you 
opened the door, etc. Use of place words, in, out, on. over, under, here, there etc ' Use 
of personal pronouns, I, you, he, his, hers, my, mine, etc. Object lessons; names of 
common objects, parts and uses. Reproduction of short stories illustrating truthful, 
ness, gentleness, kindness, unselfishness, etc. Stories of people: Indians. Esquimaux 
Chinese, etc. Use of words from reading and other lessons in original sentences All 
errors of speech corrected. 

2. Written work. In connection with writing lessons only. Capitals: names of per- 
sons; first word of sentences. Punctuation; period and interrogation mark. 

WINTER TERM. 
1. Oral work. Work of first term continued. Pictures and objects described. 
Talks on common things, e. g„ of what are houses built ? Where the wood brick 
etc., come from. Rooms in a house; things used in the different rooms Food and 
clothing; how obtained, etc. 

■i. Written work. Same as fall term. 

SPRING TERM. 

1. Oral work continued as in previous terms. Reproduction of stories and des- 
criptions, the principal feature of this term's work. 

2. Written work the same as previous terms. Writing short sentences of their own 
without copy. 

Language should be taught with all subjects. Pupils should be required to use 
complete statements in answer to questions, and to talk freely and correctly. All errors 
should be corrected in every recitation. 

SECOND GRADE-FALL TERM. 
1 . Oral work. Reproduction of stories; descriptions yf objects, pictures, etc • talks 
on common things, as food, clothing, shelter, etc. All errors of speech carefully cor- 

8. Written work. Confined to copying from blackboard. Capitals; proper names 
beginning of sentences. Punctuation; period and interrogation point at close of sen- ' 

IJGIlCfS. 

WINTER TERM. 

1 Oral work. Continue work of first term. Object lessons, reproduction of stories 
and description. Talks on common things and every day surroundings and occurrences 
Constant correction of errors of speech. 

2. Written work. Writing sentences and short stories, in answer to questions and 
suggestions from teacher. Capital letters; proper names, beginning of sentences 
Punctuation; period, interrogation mark, and exclamation mark at close of sentence' 
and use of apostrophe. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



33 



Drill for 
Drill on use of 



SPRING TERM. 

1, Oral work. Work of previous terms continued, taking up nature stories adapted 
to the season. 

2. Written work. Work of winter term continued: letter writing begun. 

THIRD GRADE— FALL TERM. 

1. Oral work. Drill on short simple sentences, as questionsand answers, 
correction of negatives, as -'I nave none" for "I haint got none," etc. 
irregular and misused verbs with reference to form, e. g., I am writing a letter; you 
are writing; he has written; he wrote, etc. Reproduction of selected stories. Descrip- 
tion of pictures, objects, etc. Carerul correction of all errors in speech. 

2. Written work Simple sentences, as questions and answers, etc. Reproduction 
of short stories, descriptions, etc., based on outline given by teacher. Letter writing; 
short letters to each other and to absent friends. Copy short poems and paragraphs. 
Capitals, proper names and beginning of sentences. Punctuation, period, interroga- 
tion mark, exclamation mark, apostrophe; comma after words in direct address. 

WINTER TERM. 

1. Oral work Work of last term continued using additional list of verbs 

2. Written work. First term's work continued. Original work, stories of pictures 
and people, imaginary trips, visits, etc. 

SPRING TERM. 
1. Oral work. Continue work of previous terms, increasing drill on correct forms. 

3. Written work. Composition work exclusively. Stories, descriptions, letters, etc. 

FOURTH GRADE-FALL TERM. 

1. Oral work. Drill for correction of common errors as irftlurd grade. Reproduc- 
tion of stories ahd descriptions. Object and science lessons. 

2. Written work. Composition work; reproduction of stories, description of ob- 
jects, places, pictures, etc. Copy short poems and paragraphs. Capitals; all places 
where required in the work. Punctuation; as in third grade, adding quotation marks. 

WINTER AND SPRING TERM'S. 

1. Oral work. Work of first term continued through the year. Conversations, 
descriptions, story -telling, etc. Special subjects assigned each half-term. Drills for 
correct usage and correction of errors. 

2. Written work. Composition and letter-writing. Copy poems and short pieces 
from readers, etc. ^^ ^^ _ fajl term 

Lansmago lessons by Chas. DeGarmo, chapters : and 2. Book in hands of teacher 
only, work given to pupils orally. Much oral work by pupils, as reproduction of ato- 
ries, descriptions, narrations, etc. 

WINTER TERM. 
Chapter 3. Continue work as Art term. 

SPRING' TERM. 
Chapter I. Composition and letter-writing. During this term the language work is 
given but three days each week, two days being given to the study of literature. 
SIXTH GRADE FALL TERM. 
Deiiarmo's language lessons.chapters 5 and t>. Books in hands of pupilsfrom the first 
Follow plan of the book. Increasing the amount of oral composition required of pupils. 

WINTER TERM. 
De Inrmu's language lessons, part 2. chapters 1, 2 and 8. 



34 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



SPRING TERM. 
Complete part 2. During this term language alternating with literature giving- 
language three days each week. 

SEVENTH GRADE-FALL TERM. 
DeGarmo's language lessons, part 8, chapters I and 2. 

,,,,„ . . , „ WINTER TERM. 

Chapters 3 and 4. 

SPRING TERM. • 
Part 3, completed. Language three days each week. 

EIGHTH GRADE-FALL TERM 
DeGarmo's language lessons, part 4, completed. A weekly exercise in oral repro- 
duction or description is required. Original compositions are required not less fre- 
quently than once every two weeks. 

WINTER TERM. 
Oral and written composition continued as in winter term. Maxwell'sintroductory 
lessons in English grammar begun, chapters 1-12, inclusive. Under each topic 2 
exercises leading to original work to be brought in and the application of each po Z to 
common usage carefully considered. ^' 

SPRING TERM 
Language alternating with literature as in previous years. Maxwell'sintroductory 
lessons ,„ Enghsh grammar, chapters 18-2,, inclusive. Work of previous term con 

NINTH GRADE-FALL TERM 
Maxwell's introductory lessons in English gramm ,r, chapters 0-27 inclusive Oral 
work and original composition required as for eighth grade. 

WINTER TERM 
Chapters 27-4S, inclusive. Additional exercises under each topic selected from news- 

and e o r r^r g T e TH "f"- *** n '° m ° rig " laI ^^ucfons of the c as" "a. 
and original work continued as in fall term. 

SPRING TERM 

Language three times each week alternating with literature. Maxwell's introduc 

tory lessons, completed. Additiona. exercises and original composition "fin t°Zs 

Literature. 

rnJ,nl?? ab ' eCt * "H*" '" cun,)eUi m wltn language and nature work. The pupi 6 
commit to memory short poems, some of which are especially adapted to the season 
and special occasions incident to the season, as ChristnU. Arbor Dav e c StoHes " 
lustrative of gentleness, kindness, honesty, .hough.fuh^s, etc.. a, e t^ win, a view 

lant gewo^'T"' ^Tf- "»»««*• are reproduced by ,he chi'drc" al 

language work. Poems and st„, ,es are illustrated by the pupils on black board a, d on 

FIRST GRADE- FALL TERM 

Biri°z^£: t T yea come Dow " ; Ti,e Littie Fir Trees: ° pMie Tree g — ■"» 

the Gra'ssLne'f t™ 8 ^ **• UW and °»**»« ™ UMhWHoodj The Antar.d 
the Grasshoppe, . Other stones are selected will, special reference to the class 

WINTER TERM. 
Miner: 6 " 18 ^ 1 ^ S " ei " ,e,d a,ld ,] e Babe ' Christmas Bells; The Baby; Pine Needles: I he 



STATE NOEMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



35 



Stories:— The Christmas Stir; The Fir Tree: Elinor's Mine; Supper Time in the Barn- 
yard; William Tell; Florence Nightingale. 

SPRING TERM. 

Poems:— Spring is the Morning of the Year: The Grass, 1st and 3d stanzas; The Dan- 
delion: Be True. 

Stories:— The Bird With No Name; The Proud Apple Branch; Why the Valley Lilies 
Hang Their Heads; Robin Redbreast's Visit: Story of the Flax. 
SECOND GRADE— FALL TERM. 

Poems:— Who Taught the Spider; How the Corn Grows. 

Stories:— The Pea Blossom; The Discontented Pine Tree; The Fox and the Grapes;. 

Goldenrod and Asters. 

WINTER TERM. 

Poems:— The Months: Try Again: Take Care of the Minutes. 

Stories:— The Tortoise and the Hare; The Crow and the Pitcher; Stories of Ulysses. 

SPRING TERM. 
Poems:— The Grass : The Bluebell: Little by Little. 

Stories:— The Wind and the Sun: The Ugly Duckling. Other poems and stories se- 
lected with reference to the class each term. 

THIRD GRADE— SPRING TERM. 
Twenty minutes taken for a lesson, 'lime given for the study of choice poems- 
adapted to the grade. Our aim in giving this work is to elevate the child's taste to an 
appreciation of the best; to cultivate the imagination by leadinghim to paint word pic- 
tures in his own mind. 

Method of carrying out the work; poem written upon the board. Stanza read by 
children. Teacher hears interpretations of the meaning given by different members 
of the class, and by questioning, corrects false interpretations and adds new beauties 
to pictures already drawn. With paper and pencil the children illustrate by drawings 
the poem as pictured in their minds. Poems for the term are the following:— Father 
Time, Lucy Larcoin; Every Day is a Fresh Beginning, Susan Coolidge: Songs of Seven, 
Seven Times One and Seven Times Two, Jean lngelow: To the Fringed Gentian, Bryant. 
FOURTH GRADE-SPRING TERM. 
Aim and method same as for third grade. Poems:-Selections from Hiawatha; The 
Petrified Fern, Mary Bulles Branch: The Chambered Nautilus, Holmes. 

Above the fourth grade this subject is taught during the spring term only. In 
grades 5-9, inclusive, one lesson period for two days of each week is devoted to this 
work. Poems are written upon the blackboard, copied and committed to memory by 
the pupils. Each thought or stanza is separately discussed, its meaning made clear, 
pictures described and lessons noted. Illustrations are drawn on blackboard and on 

Paper ' FIFTH GRADE. 

The Barefoot Boy, J. G. Whittier: Paul Revere's Ride, H. W. Longfellow; Selections 
from Snowbound, J. G. Whittier. 

SIXTH GRADE. 
The Arrow and the Song, H. W. Longfellow; Freedom, Drake: King Robert of Sicily, 
H. W. Longfellow. 

SEVENTH GRADE. 
The Building of the Ship, H. W. Longfellow; Love of Country, Scott; Selections from 
Miles Standish, H. W. Longfellow. 



36 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



EIGHTH GRADE. 

The Builders, H. W. Longfellow; Vision of Sir Launfal, Lowell; King Lear, Tales 
from Shakespeare, Lamb. 

NINTH GRADE. 

The Cloud, Shelley; Lines Written in Early Spring, Wordsworth: 
Merchant of Venice, Tales from Shakespeare, Lamb. 

Arithmetic. 

FIRST GRADE— WINTER TERM. 
Teach numbers through six. Work chiefly constructive. The teaching of each 
number considered in the following order: 1. Develop a clear perception of the num- 
ber. 2. illustrate all possible combinations and separations, no sums, products, min- 
uends, or dividends, larger than the number for consideration involved. 3. Equations 
written upon blackboard expressing the above combinations and separations. Pupils 
required to recite them from board, supplying the missing terms as they proceed, also 
to copy the same as busy work. Many original story problems, whose conditions tit the 
facts in the above equations, are given by the children throughout the year. 
FIRST GRADK— SPRING TERM. 
Continue the teaching of numbers through ten. Method same as winter term. 
Problem work continued. 

SECOND GRADE— FALL TERM. 
Teaching of numbers through thirteen. Same general method as set forth in first 
year. This method does away with the actual studying of the tables, which are learned 
by continual practice in filling out the equations. Many concrete mental problems. 
Counting by twos, threes, fours and fives. Measurements; liquid measure, dry meas- 
ure, and first two facts in long measure. 

WINTER TERM. 
Teaching of numbers through eighteen. Recognition of numbers to 100. developing 
units and tens. Process of addition of two-place numbers taught, the sum of no col- 
umn exceeding nine. Process of subtraction in two-place numbers taught, where no 
figure in the subtrahend exceeds the corresponding figure in the minuend. Mental 
problems. 

SPRING TERM. 
Teaching of numbers through twenty. Teach notation and numeration to thous- 
ands. Teach tables of time and United States money. Teach how to write dollars and 
cents in connection with written problem work. Mental problems. 
THIRD GRADE-FALL TERM. 
Thorough review of second year's work. Beginning with twenty-one. continue the 
development of number through forty. Teach notation and numeration through four 
orders. Add columns of three-place numbers. Subtract three-place numbers. 

WIVTER TERM. 
Teaching of numbers through sixty -five Multiply with multipliers of one figure. 
Writing numbers in words with special attention to spelling and use of hyphen and 
comma. Many problems both for oral and written work given throughout the year. 

SPRING TERM. 
Teaching of numbers through 100. Multiply with multipliers of three figures. 
Short division. Teach nutation anil numeration through six orders. Review denomi- 
nate numbers. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL-^FIFTH DISTRICT 



37 



FOURTH GRADE-FALL TERM. 
A thorough review of third year's work. Multiplication .tables reviewed and com- 
pletes Short division continued. Study of square measure as applied in problems se- 
lected with a view to their usefulness. Notation and numeration through nine orders-. 
Pupils required to picture;the numberibefore writing. 

WINTER TERM. 
Long division. Addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and the terms of each 
defined for the first time. Many problems illustrating the application of dry measure, 
liquid measure/.long and square measures, time measure, and avoirdupois weight. 

SPRING TERM. 
Practice of long division continued. Oral course in fractions illustrating simple re- 
ductions i-Many reviews and tests given upon the work of the year, for the purpose of 
acquiring complete mastery of what has already .been learned. Special attention is 
given to care and neatness of work done by the children throughout all grades. 
FIFTH GRADE— FIRST TERM. 
A thorough review'of^all the tables. Problems including the fundamental ope ra- 
tions the multiplier and divisor not to exceed four figures. Careful attention given to 
written analysis. A short period each day devoted to rapid oral exercises and to oral 

analySlS - SECOND TERM. 

For the first time, the book'is now put in the.hands of the pupils. Milne's Elemen- 
tary A rithmetic to factoring, with supplementary work. In all grades problems beyond 
the capacity;of the pupils are omitted. Continue the review of the tables. Brief exer- 
cises in the fundamental operations for accurate and rapid work. 

THIRD TERM. 
Milne's ElementaryArithmetic to decimal fractions. Supplementary work. 

SIXTH GRADE-FIRST TERM. 
Milne's Elementary Arithmetic from the beginning to fractions.- 'Supplementary 
work. Continue exercises to'cultivate rapid and accurate work in the fundamental 
operations. Careful attention given to clearanalysis. 

SECONDJTERM. 
Milne's Elementary Arithmetic to U. S.money. Supplementary' work.lExercises 
in rapid work and'oral analysis continued. 

i* THIRD TERM. 

Milne's Elementary Arithmetic to percentage. Supplementary work. 

SEVENTH GRADE-F1RST.TERM. 
Milne's Elementary Arithmetic.^ Review..from beginning to denominate numbers. 
Givelconsiderable.supplementary.work. Attention tojieatness and form in all written 
work, i^^, SECOND TERM. 

Milne's Elementary Arithmetic .completed.? Supplementary work. Obseive all oral 

WClk ' . THIRD TERM. 

Milne's Standard Arithmetic frcm'beginnmg.to fractions. Supplementary work. 
EIGHTH GRADE-FIRST TERM. 

Milne's Standard'Arithmetic from division to decimal fractions. Supplementary 
work. Special attention is given throughout the year to careful analysis, and neatness 
of all written work. 



3« 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



SECOND TERM. 
From decimal fractions tollongitude and time, omitting "problems that are beyond 
the capacity of the pupils. Supplementary work. 

THIRD TERM. 
Beginning atMongitude and time, continue the work to percentage. 

NINTH GRADE— FIRST TERM. 
Beginning at fractions, review to denominate numbers. Supplementary work. All 
oral exercises observed. .Special'atiention to all written, work and accurate analysis 
as in preceding grades. 

SECOND TERM 

Beginning at denominate numbers/continue to percentage. Supplementary work. 

THIRD. TERM. 
Fronfpercentage to>tocks'and.bonds. 

Nature Study. 

FIRST GRADE— FALL TERM. 
Familiar talks on the following subjects:— Things that come from ;the ground, as 
food, clothing, etc., fog, clouds, autumn.leaves, evergreen trees, .roots of grasses, color 
as seen in nature. Animals;*fly,"cow. Children are frequently taken]out for walks and 
led to observe^for.themselves. 

WINTER TERM. 
Winter notes; jack frost, snow, ice, evergreen trees, house-plants, colors'ininature. 
Animals; sheep, kitten. Lessons on food, how and where obtained, how prepared, 
wholesome, etc. What.houses are built of, how and where the materials are obtained, 
rooms in a house, articles used in different'rooms, etc. 

SPRING TERM. 
Spring lesson:— Partslof a plant, root,;stem, branch, bud, leaf, blossom. Spring 
rains, sugar making. Pussy willow, fruit trees, buds and blossoms, colors in nature. 
Return of the birds, wild flowers, etc. Special lessons on dandelion, violet, maple, robin . 
SECOND GRADE— FALL TERM. 
Familiar talks'on autumn topics, bringing materials into the classroom. ;so far as 
possible. Outdoor observation is encouraged 'and pupils^ frequently go out for walks in 
order to study nature subjects more closely. 

Topics; fall flowers, ripening seeds, winter buds, evergreen trees, roots^of grasses. 
Animals; fly, spider, bee, -wasp. 

WINTER TERM. 
Shell fish; oyster, clam, conch, starfish, seaurchin, crab, etc. Lessons on wool, 
cotton, feathers, water, milk, tea, coffee. 

SPrtING TEHM. 
Plants;'brief;review;of first grade^topics. Bark; what it is, how it grows, strength, 
etc. Parts of a plant; root, stem, branch, bud, leaf, blossom, fruit, seed. Food for 
young plants. Seed'planting. Special study of bean and pine. ^[Return of the birds. 
Study of robin, bluebird, swallow. 

THIRD GRADE-FALL TERM. 
Autumn leaves and buds;J ripening fruit^'nutslandiseeds, protection of seeds; spe- 
cial lessons on corn, oak, apple, sunflower, thistle; watching the birds; effect of sun and 
frost on vegetation. Animals; grasshopper, squirrel. 

WINTER ( TERM. 

Incidental lessons connected with reading and geography. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 3f) 

SPRING TERM. 
Seed planting and study of germination, plant corn, beans, peas, morning glory. 
Opening buds, food and growth. The following named trees noted and compared, as 
to general appearance, color and kind of bark, color and shape of leaves, blossoms, 
seeds, etc.: maple, elm, hickory, linden (basswood), pine. 

FOURTH GRADE— FALL TERM. 
Autumn changes in trees and vegetables. Collect specimens for study. Habits and 
uses of plants. Special lessons on sweet pea, goldenrod, aster, and milkweed. Dis- 
semination of seeds; dandelion, burdock, nuts, etc. Animals; preparation for winter. 

WINTER TERM. 
General lessons in connection with reading and geography. Special lessons on coal, 

iron, lime. 

SPRING TERM. 

Plants; comparison of trees continued; common shrubbery compared, as rose, lilac, 
currant, etc. Wild flowers; blue violet, hepatica, triliium. Specimens collected and 
habits studied. Animals; habits of birds, nesting, food, etc. 

Beginning with the fifth grade, two lessons will be given each week. As the grades 
advance this subject becomes a more formal and technical study. The primary object 
of these lessons is to awaken an interest in things, and to establish habits of observa- 
tion. The secondary object is to furnish the child with valuable information. The 
method is governed by the end to be attained and is substantially as follows: First, 
the pupils are encouraged to tell all they know about the object. Second, they are led 
to discover all they can for themselves, notes and outlines to be made of parts, uses, 
habits, etc. Third, the teacher adds anything that may be of interest and value to the 
class. Each lesson will close with a written story or description of the object. During 
the fall and spring terms,walks will be encouraged by pupils accompanied by teachers 
to make observations. 

FIFTH GRADE— FIRST TERM. 

Eagle, elephant, lion, sponge, coral. 

SECOND TERM. 
Paper, rubber, iron, coal. 

THIRD TERM. 

Parts and shape of leaf; parts of flowers, names of common plants and trees; 
growth from seed to fruit traced. 

SIXTH GRADE— FIRST TERM. 
Native birds, ox, horse, whale. 

SECOND TERM. 

Gold, copper, silver, tin. 

THIRD TERM. 

Name and description of parts of a plant, of a leaf, of a flower. 

SEVENTH GRADE— FIRST TERM. 
Spider, daddy-long-legs, grasshopper, beetle, examined and compared; snail and 
oyster compared. 

SECOND TERM. 

Cotton, leather, wool, silk. 

THIRD TERM. 

History of plant life, flower, fruit, seeds; differences in stems, roots, leaves. 

EIGHTH GRADE— FIRST TERM. 
Flies, butterflies, and moths; ants, wasps, and bees examined and compared. 






■■'. BO 
■ 



40 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



SECOND TERM. 
Common minerals compared with reference to form, color, hardness, structure. 

THIRD TERM. 
Review work of preceding grades: differences in flowers, fruit's and seeds. 
NINTH GRADE-FIRST TERM. , 

Varieties of mammals, as flesh-eaters, gnawers, cud-chewers, etc.; of birds, as 
climbers, birds of prey, swimmers, etc., described and compared. 

THIRD TERM. 
Beview work of preceding years; uses of different parts of plants; analysis of at 
least four plants. 

Geography. 

FIRST GRADE-FALL TERM. 
Preparation for geography in connection with language. 1. Place, (a.) Position; 
here, there, on, over, under, in, out. below, above, etc. (b.) Distance; inch, foot, actual 
measurement, (c.) Direction; right, left, cardinal points 2. Stories. People of other 
lands; dress, food, shelter, modes of travel, etc. 3. Observation of and talks on sun- 
shine, rain, fog, dew, frost 4. Sand work ; making hills and valleys, streets, houses 
and lots, etc. 5. Representative work; drawing on board and jon.paperj illustrating 
stories, etc. This work is continued through the year, with special arrangement of 

topics each half-term. 

SECOND GRADE. 

Continue preparation for geography as in first year, in connection with language. 

1. Place, (a.) Position and direction, cardinal and semi-cardinal points, (b.) Distance; 
inch, foot, yard, rod, mile, actual measurements to rods. Table committed, (c.) Loca- 
tion of objects in classroom with reference to each other and with reference to pupils. 

2. (a.) Stories; "Seven Little Sisters," "Children of the Cold.' 1 "Stories of thejRed Chil- 
dren," etc. (b.) Shape of the earth in connection with stories... Begin use of globe. 3. 
Talks on sunshine, dew, frost, rain, snow, etc. Note change of seasons. 4. Draw plan 
of schoolroom and chapel to scale. 5. Conversations on questions like the following: 
Where do we get oranges ? Why do they not grow here ': What does grow in our or- 
chards ! Where do we get sugar, tea, coffee, etc. f Of what are houses built ': Where 
boards come from ? nails '< bricks '! etc. 

THIRD GRADE— FALL TERM. 

1. Review briefly work of grades one and two with additional stories of people, 
mode of life, etc. 2. The earth, (a.) Surface; composed of land and water, (b.) By 
observation of natural surroundings and use of sand and blackboard teach the fol- 
lowing: 1. Hill; base, slope, summit. 2. Mountain; system, range, base, slope, sum- 
mit, peak, volcano. H. Plain; fields, woods, meadow, swamp, prairie, desert. 4. Coast; 
beach, cliff, cape, peninsula, isthmus. 5. River; source, branches, banks, bed, water- 
fall, mouth. 6. Waters; sea. gulf or bay, harbor, strait. 3. Continue measurements. 
4. Draw classroom, scale one inch to the foot. S Talks on sun; position at different 
hours of the day, change of positions as season advances. Effect of this change on 
temperature and vegetation. 

THIRD GRADE-WINTER TERM -FIRST HALF. 

1. (a) The earth, (b) Productions; the land produces plants, animals and minerals 
specify. The water produces plants, animals and minerals, sea-weeds, fish, 'sponges, 
coral, salt, etc. (c) Motions; cause of day and night, (d) Zones; warm, temperate and 
cold parts of the earth. Describe warm and cold countries, emphasizing difference in 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



41 



people, plants and animals that live there. <e) Draw map of *^^^ 
ng principal streets, important buildings, park, river, railroad, etc. Teach _OCC pa 
itonB.neca.slty for good government, history, etc. Teach names of chief thorough 
tares their direction and towns to which they lead, 
fares, their aire ^.^ TERM _ L;VST HALF AND SPRING TERM. 

Long's Home Geography read in class, talked over, and several points developed. 

B FOURTH GRADE-FALL TERM. 

1 Review briefly the work of grade three. 2. The earth; shape, size, motions. 
How much land surface, water surface. Division into hemispheres ***£* «* 
"elns- which continent our home. Races of mankind, homes of each. Races that 
have "wed in North America. Christopher Columbus; why England and Spain are Inter- 
esting Wue How eastern continent is useful to us. Why interesting to us. Journeys; 
from Mansfield to the sea in each direction, across oceans, etc. 
WINTER TERM -FIRST HALF. 
Tioga county; draw map, teach points on county as its name (Indian), first white 
se Jersfoccupations, rivers, railroads, townstaps, county seat, etc. Talks on Pennsyl- 
vania. LAgT HALF WINTER TER M AND SPRING TERM. 

Brooks and Brook Basins. First eight chapters read and talked about in class and 
genera) lessons developed. Incidental reviews of work already gone over. 
B FIFTH GRADE-FALL TERM. 

Brief review of Tioga county and Mansfield. Swinton's Introductory Geography, 
na-es 1 to 29 inclusive. Pictures and maps studied, and advance lessons read by pupils 
and thoroughly talked over in class. Map drawing; zones hemispheres, continents,and 
North America, showing three great physical divisions. 

WINTER TERM. 
Paces 30 to 47 inclusive. Method same as last. term. Chapters 1 to 5 inclusive 
Brooks°and Brook Basins illustrated freely on board and paper. Frequent reviews and 
incidental lessons and stories that add interest to the study. 

SPRING TERM. 
Pages 48 to 63 inclusive. General reviews. Complete Brooks and Brook Basins. 
Method as previous terms. ^^ QRADE _ FALL TERM . 

Natural Elementary Geography. Begin with page 23, North America, to page 40 
sections of United States. Method as for flftli grade. Illustrate freely on blackboard 
and paper, e. g ; Illustrate river system, divide or water-parting, spring, etc. Map 
drawing- countries, sections, states, surface, rainfall, etc. 

WINTER TERM 
Page 40, sections of United States, to page 65, minor countries of North America. 
Method as preceding term. ^^ term 

page 65 minor countries, to page 72. South America. Method as previous term. 
State of Pennsylvania studied by the following outline: Draw progressive map; first 
outline then fill in as topics are studied. Topics: 1. Position in United States, bounda- 
ries 2 Countries; number, names, position. 3. Surface. 4. Drainage. 5. Climate 
6 Soil' productions. 7. Occupations. Bring out strongly the relation between sur- 
face and drainage; relief and climate; climate and productions; the physical features 
of a country and occupations of people. 8. Commerce, routes of travel, a. Cities. 
10. Government, education. 11. Brief history. 



42 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



Page 93 to page 114. 



SEVENTH GRADE-FALL TERM. 
Natural Elementary Geography. Begin with South America, page 72. and take to' 
British Isles, page 93. Incidental reviews and comparisons. Method as in sixth grade 
Careful reading and discussion of lessons, maps and pictures. Map drawing and illus- 
trations. 

WINTER TERM. 
Method as preceding term. 
SPRING TERM. 
Complete book. Method as before. 

EIGHTH GRADE-FALL TERM. 
Swinton's Grammar School Geography supplemented by Niehol's Topics in Geogra- 
phy. Beginning with Swinton's geography.take to middle Atlantic states, page 34 Fol- 
low method of topics in geography adding points from this book to lessons of the other 

WINTER TERM 
Same book to South America, page 63. 

SPRING TERM. 
To Asia, page 86. Advance lessons are always talked over, important points noted 
and discussed, maps, pictures, and illustrations studied in class. All maps carefullv 
drawn. J 

NINTH GRADE-FALL TERM. 
Swinton's Grammar School Geography. Niehol's topics in geography Beginning 
with page 86 (Swinton's Geography), take to Oceanica, page 102. 
WINTER TERM-FIRST HALF. 
Complete Swinton's Geography. 

LAST HALF WINTER TERM AND SPRING TERM 
Review by topics as in Niehol's Topics in Geography. 
METHOD FOR THE YEAR 
Discussion of advance lessons. Blackboard and pencil illustrations. Map-drawing 
Frequent reviews. Comparison of all countries with United States. 



Physiology, 



FIRST GRADE. 
The work covered during the year is as follows: Name and locate parts of the body 
head neck, trunk, and limbs. Use and care of each part. Adaptation of parts to use' 
Join sgive freedom of motion. Right uses, e.g., kindness shown by hands, feet, lips 
helpfulness by strong hands and limbs; lips that tell the truth, and say no when asked 
to do wrong etc. Care of teeth, hair, nails, ears, nose, eyes, skin; emphasize cleanli- 
ness and neatness. All lessons given orally by the teacher. Reference books "Health 
for Little Folks," "Object Lessons on the Human Body." 

SECOND GRADE. 
Object Lessons on the Human Body, parts 1 , 2, 3, 4. Simple lessons on eating drink- 
ing breathing, sleeping. Wholesome foods and drinks. Self control in eating and 
drinking. Ventilation, draughts, colds, etc. Hours of retiring and rising Value of 
re jular sleep. What is learned through the senses. Right uses of parts of the body 
All work given orally. Reference books same as for first grade. 

THIRD GRADE. 
Review briefly work of second grade. Object Lessons on Human Body parts 5 6 7 
8, 9, given orally by teacher. What we eat and drink; flesh-making foods', heat giving 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



43 



foods, water, why we need it. Hygiene; care of teeth, eyes, ears,' nose, throat, nails, 

hair, hands, feet, etc. 

FOURTH.GRADE 

Child's Book of Health read and discussed in class. Points of each lesson thoroughly 
learned by the children. Frequent reviews bringing in work of previous year. 
FIFTH GRADE-THIRD TERM. 
Oral lessons on the human body, its several parts, the uses of each part and how to 
care for it. The subject is taught as far as possible as an object lesson. Pupils are 
furnished with note books to take such facts as are designated by the teacher. The in- 
jurious effects of alcohol and narcotics are carefully taught. 
SIXTH GRADE-THIRD TERM. 
Smith's Primer Physiology is read. The method observed is about 'the "same as in 
teaching a reading lesson. Lessons_are regularly assigned, read, and thoroughly dis- 

CUSSGd. 

SEVENTH GRADE-THIRD TERM. 

Blaisdell's "How to Keep Well" is read. The method used is the same as used in the 

preceding year. 

EIGHTH GRADE-THIRD TERM. 

Smith's Elementary Physiology In this grade the subject is taught, as a regular 

branch. Lessons are regularly assigned and recited. The subject is illustrated by 

charts, etc., and all drawings of different parts of body are] observed and copied by 

pupils. 

NINTH GRADE— THIRD^TERM. 

Smith's Elementary Physiology. Lessons regularly [assigned and recited as in pre- 
ceding grade. Attention given to outlines, also Co all drawings. 

History. 

SEVENTH GRADE— FIRST^TERM. 

Montgomery's Beginner's History is read. Method used is the same as in teaching 

reading. 

EIGHTH GRADE-FIRST TERM. 

Barnes' Primary History is also used as a reader in this grade. Pupils arelcarefully 

questioned on the thought. All important events and facts of interest are emphasized 

and frequently reviewed. An effort is made to bring out all moral lessons by allowing 

open and free discussion in which all pupils are encouraged to take.part. 

Music. 

The vocal work in the model school is taught by the seniors under' the supervision 
of the Normal teacher of vocal music. The seniors are fitted for this work during their 
junior year and in addition to this training they meet the vocal teacher every week for 
suggestions and help in the lesson for the week. The music in the , model 'school is 
taught according to the American chart system. The aim of this department is to give 
the child a foundation for accurate and rapid sight reading, correct knowledge of time 
in its less complicated rorms, a musical ear and a repertoire of. appropriate children's 
songs. During commencement week the model schooi;gives some form of musical en- 
tertainment. 

Drawing. 

The plan of work for drawing in the model school is essentially the same as that 
given and practiced in the Classes in the Normal department. The preliminary work 



44 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



of paper folding andlcutting, stick laying and clay modeling is confined to the primary 
grades. The work in drawing in these grades consists in outline work of the views and 
appearance of the type solids and objects based on them, some work from leaves and 
flowers and the drawing of simple units of design and their use in easy decorative ar- 
rangements. In the advanced grades the work from the type solids and objects is done 
in light and shade. The work in construction is done with instruments. Difficult sprays 
of leaves and flowers and sketching from life are introduced. Historic, decorative and 
original designs are drawn in black and white, and color. 



Gymnastics. 

A period of ten minutes each day is devoted to gymnastics in all the grades except- 
ing the first. The method taught is the same that is used in the Normal gymnasium, 
though adapted to the schoolroom. Tables of exercise are taken from Baron Nils 
Posse's Hand-book of School Gymnastics. Each room is visited at least once a week by 
the gymnastic teacher, when she either takes the class or observes and criticises the 
lesson given. 

W. R. LONGSTREET, 

ELIZA J. BOYCE, 

MARY A. JENKS, 

MYRTLE J. STONE, 



CAROLINE SHELDON. 
GRACE E, BARNUM, 
FLORA MAY RUSSELL, 

Instructors. 



DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGE. 

Reading. 

A class is organized at the beginning of each term. Selections from McGuffey's 
fifth, and Harper's fifth and sixth readers are assigned for study. Supplementary 
reading from magazines and newspapers is occasionally employed. We recognize 
four aims to be kept in view: First, we aim to help the pupil acquire correct articula- 
tion, enunciation, and pronunciation. This includes careful drill in the elementary 
sounds of the language, in the phonetic analysis of words, and in diacritical marking. 
Practical work is given in the many uses of the dictionary; e. g. pronunciation, defini- 
tion, use of gazeteer, biographical and other departments. Second, we aim to give the 
student power and facility in getting the thought of an author from the written words. 
We recommend the student to practice reading aloud in his room. This is better than 
the silent reading for the reason that the student who reads silently forms the habit of 
partially getting the author's thought without clearly recognizing the meaning of the 
words. By reading aloud, on the other hand, the inability of the reader to call the 
words readily, or to understand their meaning, is forced upon his attention. The third 
aim is to secure an adequate oral expression of the thought and spirit of what is read. 
This result is not possible without the preparation gained by the work indicated above. 
Fourth, we seek to inculcate the love of good literature. 

Elocution. 

This course is special and optional,with theistudent. 

In the early stages of the work much attention is given to the formation of correct 
habits of breathing and to the acquirement of a clear, resonant tone-quality that shall 
be free from throat .effort, ^Tlie.department does not aim to give any series of voice 






STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 45 

gymnastics but merely to correct bad habits and form good ones. Perfect harmony 
should exist between the thought and the mediums by which it is expressed, viz., voice 
and gesture and development in each should go hand in hand. The pupil's power of 
expression is developed by appealing to his reasoning and imaginative faculties rather 
than to his powers of imitation. Selections adapted to the pupil's ability are assigned 
him. He is never forced into trying to portray emotions which he cannot compre- 
hend. Southwick'g Primer of Elocution and Action, and Shoemaker's Advanced Elocu- 
tion are used as text books. Supplementary work is obtained from our best speakers 
and writers. Pupils may take one or two private lessons per week of 45 minutes each. 
Each student in the Senior class must appear twice before the school, once with an 
original composition and once with a declamation. The subjects for the compositions 
are chosen from a submitted list. The outline and the completed work are reviewed. 
It is aimed to give in this list such subjects as will stimulate thought and will result in 
the student's individual and clear expression of It. Although the pupil is allowed to 
choose his own declamation, yet he is advised to select something which shall have 
some literary value and so receive twofold benefit from committing it to memory. The 
pupils receive a number of private elocution lessons, without charge, while they are pre- 
paring tills work for delivery. A certain number of the best are chosen to contest for 
the eold medals awarded in each department. This contest takes place in Commence- 
ment week. 

MOLLIE TRACY WESTON, Instructor. 

Spelling. 

Thorough and persistent drill work in spelling is necessary. This'necessity is espe- 
cially evident in a Normal school that draws its students from so many localities where 
thorough and well directed primary work is as yet unattainable. Though this drill 
must be persistent, it need not be a "grind" as some seem to think. When accompanied 
by instruction in the correct pronunciation, meaning and use of words it becomes a 
very interesting as well as a profltable method of the study of English. This interest 
is greatly increased by the introduction of variety in the exercises. Some of the meth- 
ods that have especially approved themselves are here described: 

I. 

Preparation of advance lesson; phonic drill, words pronounced, syllables and accent 
noted, difficult or unusual words drilled upon; lesson of the day written and misspelled 
words corrected. Various ways of writing and correcting words may be used. They 
may be written in lists and marked by pupils, or in sentences dictated by the teacher. 
The teacher may pronounce the words and pupils write them in original sentences to 
be corrected either by the class or the teacher. Paragraphs from newspapers and 
other sources are frequently written from dictation. Frequent exercises in rapid oral 
spelling will be found helpful. 

1. Teacher calls roll. 2. Students open books and pronounce words for the fol- 
lowing day. Teacher assists in correcting accent and pronunciation, gives meaning of 
words when necessary, etc. 3. Students lay away books and prepare to write. 4. 
Teacher dictates anywhere from thirty to fifty words from the lesson assigned from 
book the previous day. These words are to be written upon tablet paper of uniform 
size throughout the class (S by 10). 5. Two days of each week the teacher is the sole 
inspector of the work and makes her class record mostly from this. The other three 
days students exchange papers and correct the work, the students spelling the words 



4 6 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



usually. Papers are tlien handed back to the owners and a moment given in which to 
make note of misspelled words before collecting papers. The above will take only about 
half the time of the recitation. 6. The teacher next dictates a list of wordswhich she 
has prepared, selecting them from different spelling hooks, from newspapers and 
various places. These words, not having been studied by the class, will be given by 
the teacher in sentences almost wholly. Occasionally the teacher will read frorh news- 
paper and dictate as she goes along. At the close of the exercise teacher or pupil spells 
these words, students make note (in book kept for that purpose) of misspelled words. 
After a time note books become as valuable to the student as spelling boobs. 

The above method is varied by having drills in sound, diacritical markings of words 
and by teaching the most helpful rules of spelling. Occasionally recitation conducted 
orally. 

III. 

For the advanced lesson the teacher pronounces twenty or twenty-five words which 
have been selected from the speller in use. (Number of page or exercise announced to 
class). In addition, ten or fifteen words are chosen from books, magazines or news- 
papers. The teacher may use these in sentences when pronouncing to the class or the 
article from which the words are taken may be read. These words are then spelled by 
the teacher, the pupil checking the words he has misspelled and afterward looking them 
up in the dictionary or speller and correcting. A word is rarely spelled for the pupil t o 
copy. If he is uncertain of the spelling the act of looking it up will help to fix it in his 
memory. A little drill is then given on the difficult sounds, the syllabication, accent 
and meaning of these words so i hat the pupil may study them intelligently. Stress is 
laid on the distinct articulation of the word. 

The pupil is directed to keep in a note hooka correct list of the words he misspells. 
The lesson for the day is then pronounced, papers exchanged and words corrected hy 
either the pupil or teacher spelling thpm aloud. Reference is again made tothe correct 
pronunciation and meaning of unfamiliar words. The pupil may be asked to use these 
words In original sentences, papers are returned and a moment given in which the 
pupils make note of misspelled words in notebooks. Then the papers are collected. 
The teacher examines these and takes note of the words that have been incorrectly 
spelled, pronouncing them the following day with the assigned lesson. Once a week a 
general review is given. Occasionally a lesson is spelled orally. 

English Grammar. 
A preparatory class in grammar is organized for students that are not sufficiently 
advanced to enter upon the Junior work in this subject For the Junior work two 
classes are organized, requiring one and two terms, respectively, to complete the sub- 
ject. 

English Grammar is both a Bcl»nce and an art. The study of technical grammar, 
including, as it should, analysis of sentences, construction of words, and the application 
of principles In parsing, affords the best possible opportunity for the exercise of the 
reasoning faculties. If correctly presented, the study of grammar is excelled by no 
other study in affording material for mental discipline. 

The study of grammar should be made practical, since ability to speak and write 
the English language is the end chiefly sought. Careful attention is given to the in- 
flection of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverbs, the principal parts of 
irregular verbs, the classification and analysis of sentences, and the correct uses of 
words, 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



47 



One recitation weekly is devoted to composition work, including letter writing, 
uses of capital letters, and, incidentally, the commonest rules of punctuation. Near 
the close of the term, each student is required to hand in a satisfactory essay upon a 
subject assigned him by the teacher. Not less than au equivalent of two recitations 
per week is given to the study of practical grammar. 

The text books in use are Maxwell's "Advanced Lessons in English Grammar," and 
Reed and Kellogg's "Higher Lessons in English." The former book is used for analysis 
of sentences, classification and inflection of the parts of speech, while the latter is 
used for composition work and the correction of errors in the use of English. 

H.J. VAN NORMAN, Instructor. 



Rhetoric and Composition. 

Tne work in Rhetoric and Composition, a term study, covers the following ground:— 
1. Punctuation. The important usages not noted in the course in grammar, are 

considered. Illustrations of these uses are required. Paragraphs for the study of 

punctuation are assigned, and dictated test work given. 

3. Directions for preparing a composition. This is to guide the student in choice 

of subject, collection of material, preparation of outline, and manuscript. 

3. The Paragraph and Its Purpose. Examples of isolated and related para- 
graphs are studied with reference to the topic-sentence, the general laws, and the 
force of connection. In this work three kinds of composition are taken: description, 
narration, exposition. 

4. Sentences. The three rhetorical qualities, clearness, force, unity, are consid- 
ered, likewise the rhetorical classification of sentences, and the force, of each variety. 
Common errors such as the indefinite use of pronoun, squinting construction, the 
adverb for the adjective, misapplied modifiers, and false concords, are considered some- 

WllH.t SDcLl'SGlV. 

5. Diction. The value of a good vocabulary, and the means of acquiring it, are 
discussed. Exercises illustrating the purity, propriety, and precision of words, neces- 
sitating a somewhat critical study of words from the dictionary and Crab's Synonyms, 

are employed. 

6. Figures of Speech and Their Use. Metaphor, Simile, Synecdoche, Metonomy, 
and personification are taken, together with the work of changing from one to another 
figure, and from the figurative to the literal. 

Following the work under Section 2. the semi weekly writing of paragraphs is re- 
quired, with the aim of training the pupil in the writing of clear, forcible, and appro- 
priate English to tell exactly what he thinks. 

English Literature. 

The work in English Literature, a term study, is chiefly the study of four classics: 
Macbeth, The Princess, Moss -s from au Old Manse, Snowbound, ana the lives of the 
authors. These classics are read critically, with reference to their thought, style, and 
allusions. Reports and original comments written in note-books are called for. 
Writings based on these classics are required. In addition to the study of the classics 
mentioned, the formation of our language through the fusion of the Norman French 
and Anglo-Saxon is considered.and some of the most prominent men in various epochs, 
such as Chaucer, Milton, Burns, Scott, Dickens, Irving, and Longfellow, are 
studied. The text book used is Shaw's English and American Literature. 



4 8 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Beginning German. 

" he objects to be attained are: (a) A good pronunciation; (b) Ability to read simple 
stories; (c) Ability to construct sentences applying the elementary rules ot grammar- 
id) Ability to understand easy German when spoken. 

The first year's work covers the following points: The alphabet, method of pronun- 
ciation, declension of articles, adjectives, pronouns, and such nouns as are reUdily 
classified, comparison of adjectives, conjugation of auxiliary verbs of tense and of 
mode, of weak, and the more usual strong verbs the use of the commoner prepositions 
the passive, reflexive, and impersonal verbs, and the elemsatary rules of syntax and 
word-order, as given in the flrst twenty-three exercises of Whitney's German 
Grammar. 

For translation and drill. Andersen's Bilderbuch ohne Bilder, and Bernhardt's 
Novelletten Bibliothek are used. In German ^omposition the English script is 
employed. 

Advanced German. 

Continued work in word-order, use of the indicative, subjunctive, and imperative 
modes, the tenses, participles, prepositions, and conjunctions as given in Whitney's 
German Grammar, lessons twenty-one to thirty-four inclusive. 

Three classics are read: Wilhelm Tell, Jungfrau von Orleans, Hermann and Doro- 
thea. The aim of the course is to acquire proficiency in more advanced German 
grammar and to translate ordinary German. Translation at sight and hearing is 
used throughout each course. 

FANNY L. SHELDON, Instructor. 
Latin. 
The objects sought in the work in Latin are: 1. Ability to pronounce correctly and 
read intelligently the Latin text. 3. Mastery of inflection, so that number, person case 
mood and tense can be instantly recognized. 3. A working vocabulary 4 Mastery of 
the Latin sentence and the ordinary principles of Latin syntax. 5. Translation into 
idiomatic English. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Five recitation periods of forty-five minutes each, weekly, during two terms re- 
quired of Juniors. 

Outline of work; Roman method of pronunciation, declension of nouns pronouns 
and adjectives, comparison of adjectives and adverbs, conjugation of regular verbs 
and of sum, knowledge of the principal rules of syntax gained by writing the exercises 
in "First Latin Book" by Collar and Daniell. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Five recitation periods of forty-five minutes each, weekly, for two terms reoulr 
ed of Seniors. ' 4 

Outline of work: B. Translation of the "Helvetian War." (Commentaries Book I 
chapters 1-29.) Syntax of nouns, pronouns, adjectives and verbs completed coniuga' 
tion of irregular verbs, word formation, the life of Caesar, the Roman legion, geography 
or vt&ui. 

A. Honor Section: Students who have passed "B" in the fall term with distinction 
and show marked ability in Latin, will be elected members of the Honor Section The 
aim will be to read more Latin, and to give the student the power to read intelligently 






STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



49 



without translating. Translation at sight and hearing will be emphasized. The extra 
work done will count in the College Preparatory Course. 
POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 

Caesar's Commentaries; hooks 1 (chapters 29 to 54), 2, 3, 4. Five recitation periods, 
weekly, during the tall term and first halt of the winter term. 

Supplementary reading on the lite and character of C»sar and the Roman art of 
war, is required. Constant use is made of the map. 

Cicero's Orations; Catiline, 1. 2, 3. 4, Archias. Five recitation periods, weekly, dur- 
ing the second half of the winter and the spring term. Supplementary reading on the 
life and times of Cicero, Roman Oratory, and the Roman Forum, is required. 

Virgil's jEneid; six books. Recitations during the entire year. Virgil's life and his 
position as a poet; epic poetry; poetic constructions, figures of speech, prosody, mytho- 
logical and historical references, geography of the yE.ieid. 

Latin Composition; Bennett's Latin Coniposition,complete. Three recitation periods, 
weekly, during the spring term. 

Greek. 

The objects sought are similar to those In Latin. 

Greek lessons; first Greek book of Gleason and Atherton. Five recitation periods, 
weekly, during the fall and winter terms. 

Anabasis; four hooks. Five recitation periods, weekly, during the spring term, and 
the fall and winter terms of the following year. 

Supplementary reading on the life of Xenophon, history of the period and Greek art 
of war is required, also a map tracing the route of the ten thousand. 

Greek Composition; the last forty lessons of White's Beginner's Greek Book. Three 
recitation periods, weekly, during the spring term. 

Iliad; three books (omitting in book 2 11.484 end). Study of the language of the 
poem, Homeric syntax, the epic hexameter, mythology, figures of speech. 

G. CLAYTON ROBERTSON, 
IRENE C. NEWHOUSE, 

Instructors. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 



Arithmetic. 

In arithmetic three classes are formed, requiring one, two and three terms respect- 
ively, to complete the subject. The most advanced class beg ns at ratio, the second 
class at percentage, and the third class at fractions. 

Special attention is given to some parts of the arithmetic; for example, fractions, 
denominate numbers, measurements, longitude and time, pure percentage and its vari- 
ous applications of profit and loss, commission, interest, discount, and taxes. On the 
other hand there are some parts of the arithmetic which are seldom or never used after 
leaving school, as equation of payments, averaging accounts, savings hank accounts, 
alligation, annuities, circulating decimals, and arbitration of exchange, which are 
omitted altogether. 

Every intelligent person admits the superiority of mental arithmetic over written 
problems as a means of cultivating the memory, increasing the power of attention and 



5° STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 

strengthening the faculty for concentration of thought. Hence it has been thought 
best to devote the equivalent of two recitations per week to the solution of mental 

problems. 

In recitation, each topic under discussion is developed by a direct appeal to the rea- 
son without reference to any formal rule, while the rule is made use of only as a gen- 
eral deduction drawn from the solution of concrete examples. 

H. J. VAN NORMAN, Instructor. 

Elementary Algebra. 

The junior course requires elementary algebra complete. All principles are dem- 
onstrated and fully discussed. Special attention is given to the following subjects- fac- 
toring, the solution of simple and quadratic equations, the binomial theorem square 
and cube root, progressions, and proportion. 

Higher Algebra. 

Higher algebra is required in the scientific course and in the regular Normal 
course. Daily recitations for two terms of fourteen weeks each are given to this sub- 
ject. 

Plane Geometry. 

Plane geometry is a senior study, and two terms of fourteen weeks each are re- 
quired to complete it. The classes have a recitation period of forty-five minutes each 
daily. Special attention is given to the demonstration of original propositions and the 
solution of problems. 

Solid Geometry. 

Solid geometry is a term study. Recitations occur daily. In solid geometry as in 
plane, demonstrations and solutions of original propositions and problems are required. 

Plane Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Many practical problems involving trigonometrical functions are solved Demon 
strations of the formulae are required. The classes are given drill in the applications 
of plane trigonometry to surveying. The transit and other necessary instruments are 
explained. Surveys are mapped and areas computed. 

J. P. BREIDINGER, Instructor. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE. 

The course of study in physical science has for its aim- 

1st. To lead the student to acquire the power and habit of accurate observation 
of the facts of nature and the ability to draw from these facts legitimate inre ences 
as to their causes and relations. ""-erauces 

"1 J„^ff ?. r i^ ai I 1 i"l i !L th . e _ eXpressio;1 ' oral a » fl -»"«"■ <* the student's con- 



elusions in clear and forcible language 

3d. To relati 
experience. 

4th. To mal 
of it in teaching 



^To relate everything, as far as possible, to the student's former and present 



3d. 
peril 

t 4 in'teI°cbZ ke the W ° rk " eleme,ltar r as ma >" b e, with a view to the student's use 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



51 



Geography — Descriptive and Physical. 

The particular aim in view In the study of descriptive geography, is to fix in the 
mind such knowledge as the student may already have and .is far as possible, relate 
such knowledge to his every day experiences. 

The topical method is used in teaching, and the following summary of topics may 
indicate the ground covered. 

1, The form. size, and motions of the earth. 

■1. Directions, positions, and measurements. 

3. Land masses, continental and insular, with their groupings. 

4. Oceanic and inland waters. 

5. Political divisions— comparisons with United States. 
0. Routes of commerce, communication and travel. 

7. A more thorough and complete study is made of the United States and Penn- 
sylvania 

Physical geography is restricted to the physical features of the earth, and the 

animals and plants which live upon its surface. 

ELIZA J. BOYCE, Instructor. 



Agriculture and Nature Study. 

This course of instruction has been adopted for its obvious utility especially to stu- 
dents who come, as so many of our students do come, from farming districts. By the 
adoption of this course, the authorities of the school have shown their recognition of 
the growing interest and increasing estimation of the value of good farming to the 
community and the country at large, and of the attractions of a life in the country. 
It is believed that when the young men and women are properly educated in these mat- 
ters, higher estimation of the blessings of country life will stop the present unfortunate 
tendency to desert the farm and crowd the cities. It seems especially appropriate to a 
Normal school, where so many teachers of the country districts receive the best of their 
education. Whatever knowledge and inspiration is imparted here will be at onee_ dis- 
seminated by the agencies of the district schools. 

The studies of this course, with the exception of nature study, are not required, as 
yet, for graduation. It will be wholly optional with every student whether he take all 
the subjects laid down in the courses, or a part of them, or none The value of the 
work will be explained, and all, especially all who are expecting to teach in country 
districts, will be urged to pursue it. 

The instruction will be imparted mainly by means of lectures, as no suitable text 
books are yet extant on these subjects. 

In the course in nature study, which will, of course, be most universally attractive 
and useful, the work will be very largely of the nature of field work. 

Nature study, to quote Professor L. H Bailey, a high authority on this subject, is 
"Seeing the things which one looks at and the drawing of proper conclusions from 
what one sees. Nature study is not the study of a science, as of botany, entomology, 
geology, and the like. That is. it takes the things at hand and endeavors to understand 
them, without reference to the systematic order or relationship of the objects. It is 
wholly informal and unsystematic, the same as the objects are which one sees. It is 
entirely divorced from definitions or from explanations in books. It is therefore su- 
premely natural, It simply trains the eye and the mind to see and to comprehend the 



S 2 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 

common things of life; and the result is not directly the acquirement of science but the 
establishment of a living sympathy with everything that is." 

W. A. STOCKING, JR., Instructor. 

Physiology and Hygiene. 

Five recitations per week for one term are required. 

A finely mounted skeleton, complete, and a valuable manikin from the best French 
manufactory, have been furnished to the school. Martin's Human Body, elementary 
course, is the text book used. The work includes the study of bones,articulations,mus- 
cles, the vascular, respiratory, digestive, and nervous systems, elimination, animal 
heat, and the special senses. In the consideration of each of these subjects special 
attention is given to the hygiene of the body. The effects of alcohol and tobacco are 
noticed. Of alcohol, the effect on the digestive, respiratory, vascular, and nervous 
systems; its interference with proper oxidation and elimination. Of tobacco, the effect 
on the throat, digestion, circulation, the nervous system, and the special senses. 
Special attention is called to the narcotic effects of both alcohol and tobacco on the 
brain and through it on the will and the moral character of the individual. The fact 
is emphasized that the delicate tissues and organs of the child and youth are especially 
sensitive to the influence of stimulants and narcotics, and therefore sure to be injured 
by their use. 

Special physiology is given seniors in lectures on physical culture. 

Physics. 

The students of thejsenior class study physics during two terms of the year. 
The course consists of ..a series of experiments from Gage's Introduction to Physical 
Science, selected with reference to ease of comprehension, and to illustrating the main 
principles and practical applications of the science. 

These experiments are performed by the teachers, questions asked which lead the 
student to observe closely the conditions and results, and he is expected to draw his own 
inferences and state them in his own language. The student is expected to be familiar 
with the text, and questions and problems are given to test his knowledge. Each student 
then writes in his note book a description of the experiments, illustrating each by a 
drawing. 

The work of physics in the post graduate course is along the same line but more 
extended, and the students perform a series of experiments. 

Botany. 

Botany is studied by the junior class during the spring term, about half of the 
time being devoted to the study of the text book and the remainder to practical work. 

A well-lighted room has been furnished with tables and instruments to serve as a bot- 
anical laboratory. The class is divided into sections sufficiently small to provide each stu- 
dent with a microscope and afford opportunity for personal supervision and suggestions 
from the instructor. The practical work with microscope Includes the examination of 
seeds as to their structure, reserve materials, protection and means of dispersal; roots 
as to their nature, form and means of absorption; buds as to structure, nature of parts, 
protection and growth; leaves as to venation, form and uses; flowers, showing that 
their parts are simply stems and leaves metamorphosed to serve particular functions. 
While dissecting seeds the student is instructed to plant a window-garden with seeds 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



53 



similar to the ones examined and study their mode or germination and growth. He is 
required to keep a complete record of all observations and conclusions, and to illustrate 
all essential points by drawings. 

Each student prepares an herbarium of as many representative plants as time will 
allow. 

The aim of the course is to lead the student to see that the plant is a living organ- 
ism, that the law of "the survival of the fittest" applies, and that the plant able best 
to protect itself, to adapt itself to conditions of climate and soil, surpasses its neighbor 
in the struggle for life. 

Zoology. 

The scientific class study zoology one half term. The method is, so far as practi- 
cal, from observation. 

The characteristics and classification of animals are studied and lists made by the 
student of the animals witl. '.vliich he is familiar, putting each in its proper place in 
the classification. 

The course, too brief to study all branches, includes a careful study of insects as 
to morphology, development and metamorphosis in the living specimens. The follow- 
ing points are also touched upon: the doctrine of evolution and the criteria by which 
we judge the animal's rank; ihe theory of instinct; the voluntary and automatic 
movements; the principal organs with their functions, adaptations, corelations and 
analogies. 

Geology. 

The students of the scientific course give one half term to the study of geology. 
For this study the school is well equipped. Our cabinet contains a fine collection 
arranged to illustrate lithology and historical geology. Besides, the surrounding 
region is aim jst ideal for excursions to examine the structure and arrangement of 
rocks and to collect specimens for private cabinets. The effect of frost in aiding to 
disintegrate rocks, of rivers in eroding their banks and depositing detritus and silt, 
and of erosion during glacial period, are well illustrated by the rocks, streams and 
hills in this section, and.are visited, examined and discussed by the students. 

Chemistry. 

One term is spent by students of the scientific and post graduate courses in the 
study of chemistry, the first half being devoted .to chemical theory and the more com- 
mon elements with their properties and symbols, and the equations representing their 
reactions. A sufficient number of selected experiments are performed by the teacher 
to illustrate the text. The latter half of the term is spent in individual work. The 
student performs a list of experiments recommended by the committee of ten for sec- 
ondary schools, and writes a description of these, together with the equations repre- 
senting the chemical reactions, in his note books. 

Frequent quizzes and examinations are held to test his ability and accuracy. 

Astronomy. 

One term is spent by students of the scientific and ( si graduate courses in the 
study of astronomy. 

The student is expected to acquire a correct notion as V) the simpler methods and 
results of astronomical research. He acquaints himself with the facts as given in the 






■ 



54 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



text book and verifies them as tar as possible, observing the heavens, noting the posi- 
tions and movements of the planets, and brighter stars, and tracing the principal con- 
stellations. The uses of the telescope and spectroscope are explained 'and illustrated. 
The more important statistics are learned, the theories to account for the origin 
and structure of the universe, and the laws of planetary and cometary motions. 

I. M. GAYMAN, Instructor. 

DEPARTMENT^ HISTORY AND CIVIL GOVERNMENT. 

The work of this department gains importance from the fact that a knowledge of 
our history and institutions is considered a necessary precedent to intelligent Ameri- 
can citizenship. 

American History. 

In American history, five recitation periods, of forty-five minutes each, weekly, for 
twenty-one weeks, are required of the junior class. 

The objects sought are: (a) A knowledge of the leading facts in the political, social, 
and industrial history of this country; (b) to show the relation to one another of events 
and movements, from the standpoint of cause and effect; (c) to create a desire for fur- 
ther historical study; (d) to teach patriotism. 

Events are associated in their time and place relations, also by their relation to 
great historical characters. Biography is made prominent. Attention is given to the 
related facts in English history. 

Readings from historical fiction, debates, map-drawings, and historical objects are 
employed as aids in the study of this branch. 

The subject is taken upin the following natural order: Explorations, colonizations 
inter-colonial wars, the revolution. Presidential administrations, civil war, events of 
later history. 

Civil Government. 

Five recitation periods, weekly, of forty-five minutes each, for a half term (seven 
weeks), are required of the junior class for civics. The subject is taken up as a sup- 
plement to United States history. 

The course attempts a thorough analysis of the constitution of the United States a 
comparison between the National government and the governments of the states, and 
of foreign countries, and a discussion of the principles of government, and of the 
reason for the provisions of the constitution, and of the current events' relating to 
civics. 

General History. 

Two recitation periods, weekly, of forty-five minutes, for one term, are required of 
the seniors. This course is intended to prepare the pupil for his work in the history of 
education. 

Outlines of the history of Greece, Rome, and the Middle Ages arejconsidered 

Five recitation periods, weekly, for one term, are required of the scientific and post 
graduate classes. 

The histories of Greece, Rome, and England are taken up and treated in much the 
same manner as the history ofjthe United States. 

G, CLAYTON ROBERTSON, Instructor, 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 5g 

DEPARTMENT OF GYMNASTICS. 

The system taught is the Swedish gymnastics. All students who complete a course 
for graduation are required to take regular lessons, lor at least five terms, during the 
junior and senior years, unless excused on account of some organic disease. Gymnas- 
tic work is primarily for the weak, not for those already strong. The object is health 
rather than great muscular development. 

Although the work is done in classes, special attention is paid to individual weak- 
nesses. Students are requested to speak freely with the teacher concerning themselves 
that all may receive benefit and none injury from the work. 

Gymnastics has its place in the school curriculum, not only for the improvement 
and maintenance of the health of the pupils, but also for its distinctive educational 
effects. The equal development of the cerebral hemispheres, the cultivation of con- 
centrated attention, and of volition and courage, are possible to the teacher of educa- 
tional gymnastics. 

Each day's exercises will consist of introductions, arch flexions, heaving (hanging) 
movements, balance movements, shoulder blade movements, marching and running, 
abdominal exercises, lateral trunk movements, slow-leg movements, jumping and vault- 
ing, respiratory exercises. 

In addition to the practical work in the gymnasium, both seniors and juniors are 
instructed in the theory and method of gymnastics. Also teaching of gymnastics in 
the model school is required of seniors under the supervision of the teacher of gymnas- 
tics. 

All pupils will he obliged to wear clothing suitable for the gymnasium— divided 
skirt and loose blouse for the ladies, and a negligee shirt for the men, and rubber soled 
shoes for all. 

A certificate will be required from every pupil from some physician stating 
whether he or she has any heart trouble or other organic disease. 

GRACE EUNICE BARNUM, Instructor. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARTS. 

Penmanship. 

The time required of the preparatory class for penmanship is not specified. A 
definite amount of work must be accomplished. 
The classes observe the following: 

1. Suitable and healthful position of body. 

2. A proper method of pen-holding. 

3. A movement regular, and as free as is consistent with good form. 

4. A neat and business-like an angement of the matter written. 

Due attention is given to proportions, classifications, analysis of letters, etc., and 
special drill lessons are given in movements and methods of teaching. 

Book Keeping. 

It is our purpose to give the student such an understanding of the general princi- 
ples of single entry book keeping as to enable him to make a practical use of the same 
in actual business transactions. The following course of study is followed: 

1. A clear and definite idea of such terms as a business transaction, an account, 
debtor, creditor, resources, liabilities, net capital, net insolvency. 



MM 



56 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



2. To be able to explain the use of day-book, ledger, cash-book, order-book, sales* 
book, bill-book, check-book, and to readily and correctly record business transactions in 
these books. 

3. To open and close an account. 

4. To write and explain the use of all ordinary commercial paper, as orders, re- 
ceipts, checks, drafts, commercial and bank, sight and time notes, negotiable and non- 
negotiable and indorsements of same, statement of account, bill of goods. 

For the first several lessons the student is required to rule his own books from plain 
paper. Each student is required to hand in a complete set of books written from exer- 
cises dictated by the teacher. 

Exercises will also be given in business letter writing: (a) Ordering a bill of goods; 
(b) inclosing payment on account; (c) acknowledging the receipt of payment on or in 
full of account. W. R. LONGSTREET. Instructor. 

Drawing. 

Five periods, weekly, of forty-five minutes each, for two terms, are required of the 
junior class in drawing. 

The Prang system is taught. A plan of work for all grades is given and practiced. 
This plan includes the preliminary work of tablet and stick-laying, paper-folding and 
cutting, and clay modeling; also representation, decoration, and construction. 

Representation is the drawing of the type solids and of objects based on them, of 
natural leaves and flowers, and of costumed life. 

Decoration includes the drawing of simple units of design, arranged in borders, 
rosettes, and surface coverings, copying of historic ornament and decorative designs, 
and of elementary work in original design. Three mediums are used for this work, 
lead pencil, pen and ink, and water color. 

Construction consists of working drawings of the type solids and of simple objects, 
of patterns of the solids and of the solids truncated, and of drawings in perspective of 
points, lines, planes and their applications, as represented in the drawings of railroads, 
floors, houses, etc. The preliminary work in construction is done free-hand, followed by 
exact work with the instruments. 

Simultaneous with the work in form is the work incolor. This consists in the ac- 
quiring a knowledge of. and in the use of the six principal colors and their intermedi- 
ates, in Ave tones of each. The Prang assortment of colored papers is used in this work. 

Graduating Course in Art. 

A special course in art has been arranged requiring three years' systematic study 
of two lessons per week of forty-five minutes each, or of two years' work of three 
lessons per week of forty-five minutes each. 

A diploma is awarded to the students who complete this course. Students are re- 
quired to take a thorough course in drawing before they are allowed to do any work in 
color. They are encouraged to become self-reliant by doing as much as possible for 
themselves. 

Students may enter at any time and take such of the following branches of art as 
they may choose: Drawing from the antique, painting from the flat or still-life in oil 
and water colors, and sketching in pen and ink. 

The school is well equipped with easels, drawing-boards, a fine assortment of casts 
from the antique and of studies for oil and water colors. 

CAROLINE SHELDON, Instructor. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL— FIFTH DISTRICT 57 

Music. 

The students are required to pass a satisfactory examination in the elementary 
principles of vocal music. 

A complete knowledge of all the scales, keys, signatures, clefs, different kinds of 
measures notes, rests, etc., is required. Much attention is given to ear training, writ- 
ing intervals, singing intervals that are called for, and to the ability to he true hearers 
of music. 

Easy children's songs, college songs, and some sacred songs are taught. 

Seniors will be required to give instruction in this as in other subjects in the model 
school. „ . . ,-. m ■ 

Graduating Course in Music. 

Vocal 

The method employed in the instruction in vocal music, is a combination of the 
Italian and German methods. Particular attention is given to tone placing, correct 
breathing true intonation, clear enunciation, and general artistic song rendering. 

The pupils are encouraged to give a certain portion of their time to reading musi- 
cal literature. The object of the course is to awaken a desire for accurate musical 
ability and an inspiration that will lead them to further advancement. 

Pupils beginning vocal music are advised to arrange their time so as to take four or 
five short vocal lessons a week in place of one or two long lessons, as time spent alone 
is liable to be in some degree wasted. . 

When two students request it, lessons will be given them together as a class. This 
method has some advantages besides being less expensive. Each pupil receives indi- 
vidual attention one half of the time, and has the opportunity of hearing the correc- 
tions or suggestions made to the other pupil. This is of value to the pupil who intends 
to teach as, in this way, he learns to correct errors other than his own. 

Piano. 

The method employed in the piano department is a combined form of the Virgil Cla- 
vier School Mason's Touch and Technic, and Matthew's Graded Studies for the Piano. 
By the use of this method, the correct hand position on the keyboard is acquired, a good 
technic developed, rapid sight reading is attained, true musical feeling cultivated, and 
a foundation laid for a general musical education. The advanced pupils are carefully 
instructed in the work of the best composers, many of which works they are required 
to memorize. Since the aim of the music department is to prepare pupils for some 
public work aside from mere teaching, all students are required to appear often at the 
weekly recitals. No pupil is allowed to graduate and receive the school's certificate 
unless competent to give a satisfactory recital in public. 

Violin. 
The method employed in violin instruction is a combination of French and German 
methods. Particular attention is given to an easy, correct hand position on the violin, a 
flexible loose bowing as applied to both the wrist and arm, perfect intonation, breadth 
of tone and style, and general finish. The works of the best composers are studied and 
memorized with a view toward acquiring a good technic and true musical playing. 
Opportunities are given for ensemble playing such as duo, trio, quartette and obligate 
, ' k MYRTLE J. STONE, 

CLARA H. MERRICK, 
Instructors. 



58 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



TEXT BOOKS NOW IN USE. 



ELEMENTARY COURSE. 



Junior Year. 



School Economy — Lectures. 
Reader— Harper, McGufiey. 
Geography, Political— Redway and 

Hinman. 
Penmanship — Spencerian. 
Drawing— White. 
English Grammar— Maxwell, Reed 

and Kellogg. 
Latin Grammar — Bennett. 



Latin Reader— Collar and Daniels' 

First Latin Book. 
Physiology— Martin. 
History— M cMaster. 
Civics— Peterman. 
Algebra— Robinson. 
Arithmetic — Milne. 
Book Keeping — Gay. 
Speller— Merrill. 



Senior Year. 

Pyschology— Lectures. 
Methods of Teaching— Lectures. 
History of Education— Payne's Com 

payre. 
Rhetoric— Lectures. 
English Literature— Shaw. 



General History — Myers. 

Latin Grammar — Bennett. 

Ca'sar — Kelsey. 

Geometry — Went worth. 

Physics — Gage. 

Botany— Gray's School and Field. 



Scientific and College Preparatory Courses. 



Moral Philosophy— Lectures. 
Virgil— Allen and Greenough. 
Cicero — Kelsey. 
Latin Composition— Bennett. 
Greek Grammar— Goodwin. 
Greek Reader— Gleason and Ather- 

ton. 
Greek Composition— Jones. 
Anabasis — Kelsey. 
Iliad — Seymour. 
German — Whitney. 



General History — Myers. 
Logic — Jevons. 
Chemistry — Remsen. 
Geology — Dana. 
Astronomy— Young, and Todd. 
Zoology — Holder. 
Natural Philosophy — Avery. 
Higher Algebra— Appleton. 
Solid Geometry — Wentworth. 
Trigonometry and Surveying- 
Wentworth. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



59 



Libraries. 

A good circulating library, catalogued after the most modern and 
improved plan, is open daily to all students, free of charge. All stu- 
dents have access at any time to a large reference library. 

Reading Room. 

One of the large and pleasant corner rooms of the gymnasium 
building is used for a reference library and reading room. The room 
is supplied with cyclopaedias and other books of reference, and all the 
best magazines published in the country, besides many of the best 
weekly and daily papers. The room is open at stated hours every day 
of the week. 

The reading room is furnished and managed by the Reading 
Room Association, which comprises most of the faculty and students 
of the entire school. 

The association elects officers on the first Friday of each term. 

Apparatus and Cabinet. 
The science department is well supplied with the best modern 
apparatus, which is constantly used by the classes in natural science. 
The cabinet contains a large collection of geological and biological 

specimens. 

Literary Societies. 

There are six literary societies: The Athensean, Normal Liter- 
ary, Philalethean, Agonian, 'Delphic, and Clionian. 

The Athensean and Normal Literary societies are composed of 
both men and women. ' They^have finely; furnished rooms jind good 
libraries. The Philalethean society is composed of men, and is a 
chapter of the Philalethean fraternity. The Agonian society is com- 
posed of women and is a chapter of the Agonian fraternity. The 
Delphic society is composed_of men, and is a chapter of the Delphic 
fraternity. t The Clionian society is composed of women and is a 
chapter of the Clionian fraternity. 



6o 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Lectures and Entertainments. 

Lecture courses of a high order of excellence are maintained by 
the literary societies, and by the Y. M. C. A. Many scientific and 
popular lectures are given with the aid of the.stereopticon. Frequent 
literary and musical entertainments are given by the Music Dej art- 
ment, and by the literary societies. 

The Alumni Association. 

This is an organization of the graduates of the school from all 
the courses. 

The association holds an annual business meeting on Wednesday 
morning of commencement week. The annual banquet of the asso- 
ciation is given by the school in the dining hall, which will accommo- 
date five hundred guests,on Wednesday afternoon, and the annual lit- 
erary exercises of the association are held in Alumni Hall Wednesday 
evening. 

A list of the officers andjnembers of the association is printed in 
the back part of this catalogue. 

Religious Associations. 

The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. have organizations of the 
students which maintain weekly religious meetings. 
Athletic Association. 

An Athletic Association of the students has done a great deal to 
encourage and promote out-door sports. The base ball and foot ball 
teams of the school have made a fine record during the past year. 
The Mansfield Normal School Quarterly. 

The Mansfield Normal School Quarterly was started a year ago. 
The fourth number has been issued. The first number of Volume II 
will be issued after the commencement of 1898. _ The Quarterly is 
beautifully printed and finely illustrated. Its aim is to supply the . 
alumni, undergraduates and other friends of the school with intelli- 
gence of the news, the progress, and the improvements made in the 
school. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



61 



Special Term for Teachers. 
To accommodate many teachers who desire to enter school in the 
spring, a special term and programme will be arranged to begin May 
i, 1899. Much attention will be given during the special term to 
school management and methods of teaching. 

Location, Buildings and Grounds. 
The Normal School buildings present a noble and imposing 
aspect. The school grounds have an area of ten acres. The lawns 
about the buildings are beautifully laid out and covered with a great 

variety of forest trees. 

South Hall. 
This is a brick structure, one,hundred fifty feet in length by fifty 
feet in width. In this building are the gentlemen's dormitories, the 
circulating library, chapel, six recitation rooms, and the text book 
library. This building, formerly the old seminary, was enlarged and 
remodeled in 1889. One hundred fifty feet north, and the same dis- 
tance east, of south hall, stands the 

North Hall. 
This building is in process of complete reconstruction. The cut 
represents it as it will be, when finished, one of the finest school 
buildings in the country. It is two hundred seventy feet long by one 
hundred feet wide, and five stories high. It contains the Principal's 
office, dormitories for the ladies, reception rooms, suits of rooms for 
the art and music departments, an elegant dining room, large enough to 
seat five hundred, an elevator, the kitchen, bakery, etc. Two stories 
of an ell, completely removed from the other rooms, are set apart as 
an infirmary. They are furnished with every appliance for the sick. 
The dormitories on every floor of both buildings are supplied with bath 
tubs and everything needed for health and comfort. All the buildings 
are heated by steam, lighted by electricity, and supplied with fire 
escapes of the best construction. The cost of the north building 
when completed and furnished, will not be less than $150,000. 
Midway between the north and the south buildings is 






62 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 

Alumni Hall. 

This is a brick building, fifty-four by one hundred seventeen feet, 
three stories high. It contains the Model School rooms, recitation 
rooms, the society rooms, and a concert hall which occupies one en- 
tire story. This building was completed in 1886 at a cost of $25,000. 
In the rear of the south building stands the 

Gymnasium. 

This is a fine structure; it is a frame building, fifty by one hun- 
dred thirty feet. It contains a large drill hall, fifty by one hundred 
feet, and four spacious rooms adjoining, one for library and reading 
room, one for the military company, one for botanical laboratory, and 
one for ladies' dressing room. The drill hall is well furnished with 
apparatus. This building was erected in 1888 at a cost of $7,000. 

FINAL EXAMINATIONS AND DIPLOMAS. 

Rules for admission to the Junior and Senior classes in the Ele- 
mentary course. 

1. Admission to the Senior and Junior classes shall he determined by the State 
Board of Examiners at the annual examination by the Board. 

2. In order to be admitted to the Junior class at any State Normal School, persons 
must be examined in the six Preparatory branches named and no others; and the ex- 
aminations in these branches shall be final. Those who for any reason were unable to 
complete the Preparatory examination, may be admitted to both the Preparatory and 
the Junior examinations at the end of the Junior year. But they must be classed as 
Preparatory students till the final examination in the Preparatory branches has been 
completed. No substitutions or conditions shall be allowed for any of the studies re- 
quired for admission to the Junior class. 

3. In order to be admitted to the Senior class, persons must be examined in all the 
Junior studies, except Methods, and the examination in these branches shall be final 
No substitutions or conditions shall be allowed for any of the studies required for ad^ 
mission to the Senior class. 

4 If the faculty of any State Normal School, or the State Board of Examiners de- 
cide that a person is not prepared to pass an examination by the State Board, he shall 
not be admitted to the same examination at any other State Normal School during the 
same school year. 

„ ta : 5 ' If a Pfrson who has completed the Preparatory or the Junior studies at any 

th ™„ n°r rm , ? ., d6SireS t0 e " ter an0ther State Normal Sch001 - tlle Principal of the 
school at which the examination was held shall send the proper certificate to the Prin- 

s^Ti,, n f fl ° . WlUCh UlE PerS ° n desir ^ to attend. Except for the reason here 

SSSSSS 1 * tnetHCtof the paS8,ns of the Preparatory or the 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



63 



6. Candidates for graduation shall tie examined in all the branches of the Senior 
year. They shall have the opportunity of being examined in any of the higher branches, 
including vocal and instrumental music and double entry book keeping; and all studies 
completed by them shall be named in their certificate. 

7. Persons who have been graduated in any course may be examined at any State 
examination in any branches of a higher course, and the Secretary of the Board of 
Examiners shall certify, on the back of their diplomas, to the passing of the branches 
completed at said examination. 

8. A certificate setting forth the proficiency of all the applicants in all the studies 
in which they desire to be examined by the State Board of Examiners, shall be pre- 
pared and signed by the faculty and presented to the Board. 

Rules relating to Certificates and Degrees: 

1, Students who have completed any one of the foregoing courses shall receive a 
certificate or diploma authorizing them to teach in the public schools of the State two 
years without examination. 

2. Persons who have completed any one of the foregoing courses and have taught 
two full annual school terms since graduation, shall receive a certificate or diploma, 
authorizing them to teach in the public schools of Pennsylvania without further ex- 
amination, provided that they present to the faculty and Board of Examiners a certifi- 
cate of good moral character and skill in the art of teaching from the Board, or Boards 
of Directors, by whom they were employed, countersigned by the proper Superinten- 
dent. 

8. Degrees shall be conferred as follows: 

To graduates in the Regular Normal Course, the degree of Bachelor of Elementary 
Pedagogics (B. E. P.); after two years' successful teaching, the degree of Master of 
Elementary Pedagogics (M. E. P.) 

To graduates in the Scientific Course, the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. 8.); 
after two years' successful teaching, the degree of Master of Elementary Pedagogics 
(M. E. P.) Graduates of the Scientific Course who have engaged in scientific, literary 
or professional pursuits, at least three years after graduation, may receive the degree 
of Master of Science (M. S.) 

To graduates in the Advanced Normal Course, the degree of Bachelor of Pedago- 
gics (B. P.); after two years' successful teaching after completing this course or in the 
Scientific Course, the degree of Master of Pedagogics (M. P.) 



EXPENSES. 

Tuition in all branches, with board, including heat, lighting, 
room rent, washing, 12 pieces a week, $63.00 per term, or $189 per 
year. No extras. The first payment, $40.00, is to be made on the 
first day of the term; the second payment, $23.00, to be made at the 
middle of the term. 

Tuition, without board, including all branches above, $14.00 
per term, or $42 per year. The first payment, $7.00, to be made the 



64 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



first day of the term; the second payment, $7.00, to be made the 
middle of the term. 

Students who do not live at home with parents or guardians will 
be required to board in the institution unless special arrangements are 
made with the Principal to board elsewhere. 

The total expenses for the year are $189. When students avail 
themselves of State appropriations (see next page), the expenses are 
reduced for the Junior year to $169, and for the Senior year to $119. 

With a view of discouraging a too prevalent desire to make rapid 
advancement, which is always inconsistent with good scholarship, tui- 
tion will be reduced from $14.00 to $7.00 per term to students who 
are under seventeen years of age, and who take, during the year, only 
the studies of the Preparatory year. See course of study, page 21. 

The rates for special instruction in Art, Elocution, or Music, are 
as follows: 

For a Term of 13 or 14 weeks, two lessons a week, . . . $12.00 
For a Term of 13 or 14 weeks, one lesson a week, . , . 6.00 
For a Term of less than 13 weeks, two lessons a week, 1.00 a week 
For a Term of less than 13 weeks, one lesson a week, .50 a week 

When two or more students desire to take lessons at the same 
time, in, a class, the cost to each student is reduced 25 per cent. 
Harmony and Counterpoint, in class, two lessons a week, 3.00 a term 
Rent of Piano, for periods of 45 minutes daily, . . . . 1.00 a term 

The student may make up lessons lost by unavoidable absence, in 
case the teacher is notified of the absence beforehand. 

Deduction will be made to students absent from school two con- 
secutive weeks or more on account of sickness or other satisfactory 
reasons. No deduction will be made to students entering within the 
first two weeks, or leaving within the last two weeks, of a term. 
For the special term for teachers, beginning May 1st, students will be 
charged according to the above rates for the time they are actually in 
attendance. All bills must be settled with the Treasurer. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



65 



By an act of the legislature, the following appropriations are 
made by the State to Normal students and Normal graduates: 

1 . Each student over 1 7 years of age, who shall sign a paper 
declaring his intention to teach in the common schools of the State, 
shall receive fifty cents a week. 

2. Each student who, upon graduation, shall sign an agree- 
ment to teach in the common schools of the State two full school 
years, shall receive the sum of fifty dollars. 

3. Any student to secure these benefits must attend the school 
at least twelve consecutive weeks, and he must receive regular instruc- 
tion in the science and art of teaching in a special class devoted to 
that object for the whole time such an allowance is drawn. 

In case of a deficiency in the amount appropriated by the legisla- 
ture for the State aid for students, each student will receive his propor- 
tionate share of the appropriation. 

Gentlemen's rooms are furnished with heat, light, dressing case 
with mirror, chairs, tables, stands, pails, bedsteads, mattresses, pillows, 
and one comfortable. 

Ladies' rooms are furnished with heat, light, carpet, two rock- 
ers, chairs, tables, and bedroom set complete, pillows, and one com- 
fortable. Mirror on dressing case. 

Students furnish wash-bowls and pitchers, napkins, towels, pillow- 
slips, sheets, and one comfortable. The last articles enumerated, to- 
gether with all articles of clothing, should be distinctly marked with 
full name. 

Students have the privilege of renting text-books at a nominal 
rate. 

For two days at the opening and two days at the close of each 
term, students' baggage is carried to and from the railway station free 
of charge. 



66 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



PRIZES AND HONORS. 



For excellence in "scholarship, during the yeaf 1898-99, four 
prizes are offered, as follows: 

1. A prize of $25 to the student who makes the highest average 
standing in all the subjects of the Senior year in the Elementary 
course. Limited to under graduates. 

2. A prize of $10 to the student who makes the second highest 
average standing in all the subjects of the Senior year in the Elemen- 
tary course. Limited to under graduates. 

3. A prize of $25 to the student who makes the highest average 
standing in all the subjects of the Junior year in the Elementary 
course. 

4. A prize of $10 to the student who makes the second highest 
average standing in all the subjects of the Junior class in the Elemen- 
tary course. 

The prizes offered last year were awarded as follows: 

The first Senior prize of $25 to Eugene C. Crittenden, of Os- 
wayo, Potter county. 

The second Senior prize of $20 to Mattie D. Bodine, of Mans- 
field, Tioga county. 

The first Junior prize of $25 to Henry Schneider, of White 
Mills, Wayne county. 

The second Junior prize of $20 to Joseph A. Mosher, of Mans- 
field, Tioga county. 

The Board of Trustees have authorized the presentation of two 
gold medals for excellence in oratory and original compositions re- 
spectively. These medals are to be awarded annually to the two 
members of the Senior class who shall become entitled to them by the 
decision of three competent judges. The contests for the medals in 
the class of 1898 were held in Alumni Hall, June 21st. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



6 7 



THE ALUMNI. 



Officers. 

President, W. R. LONGSTREET. Secretary, MRS. F. E. VAN KEUREN. 

Vice-President, E. A. SPENCER. Treasurer, F. m. ALLEN. 

Executive Committee. 

W. W. ALLEN. w. F. HARRER. BESSIE ELY. 

J. C. GIBSON. MRS. A. H. AVERY. 



Note.— In the following pages the figures following the name Indicate the year of 
graduation. All are graduates of the Elementary course unless otherwise marked. S., 
before the year. Indicates Scientific course; M., Music; A., Art; St. C. E., State Certificate 
Elementary; St. C. S., State Certificate Scientific; C. P. College Preparatory; H. N., Reg- 
ular Normal. *Deceased. 



Adams, Anna C, 94, Kingsley, Pa. 

Adams, Edna Lou. 93,Mansfield,Pa. .teacher. 

Adams, Edna Willis (Mrs. Lloyd G. Bullard), 

89, Sunbury, Pa. 
Adams, Emma (Mrs. W. F. Lane), 79, Ridg- 

way, Pa. 
Adams, James S.. 84, C. P. 96, New Milford, 

Pa., student Cornell University. 
Adams, Jennie Estelle, 90, Kingsley, Pa„ 

teacher. 
Adams, Ora Ruth (Mrs. A. G. Brown), 89, 

Gaines, Pa. 
Alden, Lizzie J., 90, Binghamton, N. Y., 

teacher. 
Alderson, Mary J. (Mrs. ), 68, Boston, 

Aldrich, E.' M., 95. R. N. 96. Alford, Pa. 
Allen, Anna L.. 90, Painted Post, N. Y. 
Allen, Estella G., 96,Forest City,Pa.,teacher. 
Allen, Fred M., T5, Williamsport.Pa.teaeher 

Williamsport Commercial College. 
* Allen, L. Melvlna, 08. 

Allen, Nell B.. 96, LeRaysville, Pa., teacher. 
Allen, Wilton W., 89, Mansfield, Pa., bank 

clerk. 
Allen, Mrs. Wilton W. (nee Myra Baldwin) 

88. Mansfield, Pa. 
Alexander, Myrtle V., 97, Forest City, Pa., 

teacher. 
Allyn, Arthur E., 80, Hastings, Adams Co., 

Neb., traveling salesman. 
Alworth, H. S.. 89. Scranton, Pa., lawyer, j 
*Amerman, Alonzo. M. D., 72. 
"Amerman, Carrie (Mrs. Carrie C'oxey),M 73 



Amerman, Charles Verrill, 90, Scranton, 

Pa., law student. 
♦Amerman, Ella. 82. 

Amerman, E. C., UB, Danville. Pa., teacher. 
Ames, Herbert T., LL. B., 67. Williamsport, 

Pa , lawyer. 
•Ames. Lizzie B , 66. 
Ames, Walter W., LL. B., 68, Brookville, Pa., 

lawyer. 
Ames, Truman. 74. DuBois, Pa., lawyer 
Andrew, George W., 89, Prompton, Pa., stu- 
dent Dickinson College. 
Ansley. Carrie (Mrs. Cortright), 82, Galeton. 
Angle, Harrys.. 92, Milford. Pa., printer. 
Argetsinger, C. L., 95, Mansfield, Pa. 
Argetsinger, George Francis, 90, Rochester, 

N. Y., traveling salesman. 
Armstrong, Agnes, 94, Fall Brook, Pa., 

teacher. 
Arrowsmith. Anna Macauley, 90, Blossburg 

Pa., teacher. 
Arrowsmith, Jennie, 94, Blossburg Pa. 

teacher. 
Ashcraft.Mrs. Dr. E. H.fnee Anna L. Jones), 

.7, Coudersport, Pa. 
Ashley, Addison Berne. 93, Mainesburg, Pa , 

teacher. 
lAshley, Florence Lillian, 93, Wellsboro, Pa., 

Ashley, Will Welch, 91. Mainesburg, Pa 
Ashton, Mrs. Charles H. (nee Cora H. Phil- 
lips), 91, Cambridge, Mass. 
Atwood, Elizabeth S. (Mrs. Piatt), 88, He 
ricksville, Pa. 



68 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Austin, Leroy George, 94, Ogdensburg, Pa. 
Austin, Mrs. W. P. (nee Lulu Mae Barton), 

94, Mansfield, Pa. 
Avery. Mrs. A. H. (nee Jennie E. Farreri, .6, 

Mansfield, Pa. 
Babcock, L. W., 79, Ukiab, Cal., teacher. 
Babeock, Sara A„ 73, Leonardsville, N. Y. 
Backer. Nellie E. (Mrs. Irvin W. Cole), M. 85, 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
♦Bailey, Ada L. (Mrs. L. Doumaux), 69. 
♦Bailey. Carrie A. (Mrs.Beni.C. Wheeler), 72. 
Bailey, Ella May, 90, Brooklyn. Pa., teacher. 
Bailey. Eula (Mrs. Frank A. Beach), 88, No. 

1006 Walnut St.. Elmira. N. Y. 
Bailey. Florence Eveline, 94, Mansfield, Pa., 

Bailey. Frank H., 83, Coudersport, Pa., civil 

CllSillGGI". 

Bailey, Mrs. Frank H. (nee Myrtle L. Welli- 

ver), 89, Coudersport, Pa. 
Bailey, Josephine (Mrs. Byron Grenolds), 88, 

Elkland, Pa. . 

•Bailey, Mrs. L. L. (nee Lizzie C. Hill), E. 69. 

M 71. 
Bailey. Lucv B. (Mrs. Frank H. Rockwell), 

88, Wellsboro, Pa. 
Bailey. Ransom W., 77, Wellsboro, Pa., mer- 
chant. , „ 
. Bailey. Sadie V. (Mrs. John Robinson), 92, 

'Wellsboro. Pa. 
♦Baker, Albert H., M. D., 77. 
Baker. Burt W., 73, Archer, Merrick Co., 

Neb , farmer. 
Baker, Mark C, 73, Duluth, Minn., music 

teacher. , 

Baker.Rose Lemirah,9[>,North Bingham.Pa., 

tfMCllGr. 

♦Balch Mrs E. P. (nee Permelia Buttles),69. 
Baldwin, Besse R..90, Mansfield, Pa.,teacher. 
Baldwin, Charles T., M. D., 80, Birmingham, 

Conn. _ ,. _ 

Baldwin, Charles T., 90, Mansheld,Pa., agent 

school supplies. 
Baldwin, Daniel w.,77.Westheld, Pa, lawyer. 
Baldwin, Ella May, 97, Dixon, Pa., teacher. 
Baldwin, Genevieve. 88, Mansfield, Pa., 

teacher. 
Baldwin, Henry L., 71, Tioga, Pa lawyer. 
Baldwin, Kate W., M. D., 75, Philadelphia, 

Baldwin', Martha A. (Mrs. Walter S. McKin, 
ney), 78. No. 575 Washington Boulv.- 
Ch'icago, 111. 

Baldwin, Mary E„ M. D.. 67, Newport R.I. 

♦Baldwin, Mary S. (Mrs. Edgar E. McKin- 

Baldwin, ilyra (Mrs. Wilton W. Allen), 88, 
Mansfield, Pa. 

Baldwin, William W., M. D., 71, No. 1 Via 
Polastro. Florence, Italy. 

Ball Sadie E. (Mrs. Andrew B. Dunsmore). 
85, Wellsboro, Pa. 

Barden. Kate (Mrs. A. W. Stevenson), 84, 
Mansfield, Pa. 

♦Barhight. Mrs. Henry D.(nee Mary H, Den- 
nis), 97. 



Barnard, Nettie E., 91, East New Milford, 

T>a tGneliGr 
Barnes, Mrs. Eugene T. (nee Nono Moody), 

87, Mansfield, Pa. 
Barnes. Fannie (Mrs. J. A. Dewey). 83, Wan- 

Barnes, Mrs. George (nee Alice T. Weed), 68, 

Trout Run, Pa. 
Barnes. George II.. 88. 
Barnes, Mrs. Jos. C. (nee Lucy J. Whipple), 

72, Mansfield, Pa. 
Barnes, Orange P., 81. Leavenworth, Kan., 

1"G3 Pi 1GT 

Barnes.Mrs. Orange P. (nee May E. Wright), 

81, Leavenworth, Kan. 
Barnes. Louise M , 95, Scranton.Pa., teacher. 
Barnes, Mrs. William (nee Emma Ribble), 

75, 585 Superior St., Toledo, Ohio. 
Barney, Delwin C, 76. West Union, N. \ ., 

lumberman. ,. „ 

Barnhart, Austin E„ 88. Trowbridge, Pa., 

Barrett, Anna Louise. 90. No. 334 W. Market 

St , Scranton, Pa., teacher. 
Barrett, Etta (Mrs. Henry P. Friends), 92, 

Trowbridge, Pa. 
♦Barrett. Henry C, 71. 
Barrett, Henry Diamond, 93, Harford, Pa., 

teacher S. O. S. 
Barrett, Homer N„ 92, East New Milford. 

PEL tPrLCllGr. 

Barton, Ina Dillistin, 96, Mansfield, Pa., stu- 
dent S. N. S. 

Barrow, Merton L„ 88, Canton, Pa., jeweler. 

Bartholomew, Mrs. H. H. (nee Mary Jane 
Grinnell). 90, Wellsboro, Pa. 

Bartlett. Samuel H.. 85, Hiram, 0„ theolog- 
ical student. 

Bartlett, Mrs. Samuel H. (nee Libbie E. 
Wood), 86, Hiram, O. 

Barton, Lulu Mae (Mrs. W. P. Austin), 94, 
Mansfield, Pa. „ „. 

♦Bates, Mrs. Julia M. (nee Eliza J. Shaw), ,1. 

Bates, Mary, 97. Knoxville, Pa., teacher. 

Battle. Agnes V.. 88, No. 36 S. Main St.,Pitts- 
ton. Pa., teacher. 

Battle, Teresa C, 89. M. 89, 26 S. Main St., 
Pittston. Pa., teacher. 

Baumann, Mrs. A. (nee Ida E. Hooker), 75, 
S 79, Elmhurst, Pa. 

Baynes, Ada A. (Mrs. J. C. Rexford), 85, 
Mansfield, Pa. 

Baynes, Agnes M. (Mrs. T. E. O'Dell), 89, 
Mansfield, Pa. 

Baynes, Cora Estella (Mrs. Fred Davis), 90, 
Mansfield, Pa. 

Baynes, M. Ella. 91, Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 

Beach, E. Ellsworth, 96, Mansfield, Pa., 

tjG3jCllGr 

Beach, Charles A., M. D., 76, Sayre, Pa. 
Beach, Mrs. Dr. Charles A. (nee R. Belle 

Smith), 75, Sayre, Pa. 
Beach, Coly J., 88, Mansfield, Pa , agent and 

farmer. 
Beach, Mrs. Coly J. (nee Frances L. Rock. 

well), 88, Mansfield, Pa. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



6 9 



A 



Beach. Fannie M.. M. 71, Montrose, Pa. 
Beach, Mrs. Frank A. (nee Eula Bailey), 86, 

1003 Walnut St., Elmira, N. Y. 
Beach, George D., 8?, Little Marsh, Pa ,mer- 

chant. 
Beach, John Wesley, 93, Mansfield, Pa.. 

Beacli. Mrs. John Wesley (nee Edna King), 
M. 92, Mansfield, Pa. 

Beach, Joseph H„ 7(i, Elmira, N. Y., insur- 
ance. 

Beach, Newton M., 91. Mansfleld.Pa., farmer. 

Beach, Mrs. Newton M. (nee Carrie Carley), 
91, Mansfield, Pa. 

Beak. Mrs. E. A. (nee Ella Middaugh), M. 73, 
018 Hough Ave.. Cleveland, Ohio. 

Beale. George W.. LL. B., 88, No. 227 Wash- 
ington Ave,, Scranton. Pa., lawyer. 

Beamish, Mary Frances, 93. No. 415 River 
St., Scranton, Pa. teacher. 

Beamish, Nellie R., 90. No. 415 River street, 
Scranton, Pa., teacher. 

Beardslee, Emma R. (Mrs. Charles I. Beard- 
sley), 70, Hoblet, Pa. 

Beardslee, Seeley J.. 74, Canton, Pa., mer- 
chant. 

Beardsley, Mrs. Chas. I. (nee Emma R. 
Beardslee), 70. Hoblet. Pa. 

Beardsley, Mrs. Geo. G. (nee Alice E. Tears), 
80. Troy, Pa. 

Beardsley.Phida E. (Mrs.James H.Reading), 
78, Ridgwav, Pa. 

Bell. Nellie L., 94, Scranton, Pa. 

Bennett, F. Louise (Mrs. J. L. Boak), M. 91, 
355 West Gray St , Elmira, N. Y. 

Bennington. Edith G., 97, Williamsport, Pa 

Benson, Eds m Andrew, 93, East New Mil- 
ford. Pa., teacher. 

Benton, Jessie, 88, No. 58 Seneca St. .Buffalo 
N. Y., merchant. 

Benton, Sarah E., 91. No. 148 Chester St. 
Buffalo, N. Y., teacher. 

Bernauer, Morris John, 92, Marshfield, Pa., 

Berry. Grace E. (Mrs. Allen A. Doane) 

Leona, Pa. 
Bevens, Mrs. E. L. (nee Elnora Lung), 06, 

Decatur, 111. 
Beverson. Lizzie Z. (Mrs. Dr. J. M. Mills), 82 

Antrim. Pa. 
*Bierly,Mrs.W.R.(nee Florence H.Bosard),69 
Billings, Carrie V. (Mrs. C. M. Thomas), 85 

Starkville, Pa. 
Billings, Edwin, 68, Corning, N.Y., merchant 
Bird, Albert A.. A. M., 77, Wilcox, Pa., cler- 
gyman. 
Bird, Orpheus Brainerd, M. D., 60, Vineland, 

N.J. 
Bixby, Bert John, 93. Mansfield, Pa. .teacher 
Bixby, Clara E., 94. Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 
Black. Edith J., 96. Roaring Branch, Pa.. 

teacher. 
Black, Mrs. Benj. (nee Clara A. Stevens), 68, 

Idaho Springs, Colo. 



Black, Nellie M., 97, Canton, Pa., teacher. 
Blackburn, Harry H., 81, Puyallup, Wash,, 

lawyer. 
Blair, Elizabeth C, 94, Blossburg, Pa., 

■J-pa ft VlPI* 

Blaksley, Evelyn Harper. 92, Sayre, Pa., 

t p a o li p v 
Blaksley, Georgia L., 96, Sayre, Pa., 

Blaksley, Blary N., 97, Sayre, Pa., teacher. 
Blaksley, Nellie Knapp, 94, Sayre, Pa., 

Blanchard, Mrs. Chester (nee Nellie M. 

Rockwell),77, Farmington Hill, Pa. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Oliver Benj. (nee Angie J. 

Close), 89, Farmington Hill, Pa. 
*Bliss, Mrs. W. L. (nee Alma M. Merrick), 70. 
Boak.Mrs. J. S.(nee F. Louise Bennett),M 91, 

355 W. Gray St., Elmira, N. Y. 
Bodler, Anna E., 85, S. 92, Germania, Pa., 

Supt. Schools Potter Co. 
Bodler. John William Walton, E. 90, S. 93, 

(Grad. Lafayette), Williamsport, Pa , 

teacher. 
Bodler, Sophia L., 96, Germania, Pa., 

Boland. Ella A., 9T, Carbondale, Pa., 

Bolles, Annie M. (Mrs. Wm. N. Judson),71, 

Soutli Auburn, Pa. 
Bolles, Mrs. Geo. W. (nee Lucetta Lyon), 69, 

Auburn, Pa. 
Bolles, Jessie E. (Mrs. Rev. E. A. Warriner), 

79, Montrose, Pa. 
Bolten, Blanche. 93, Clifford, Pa. 
Bond, Nora Imogene(nee Mrs. J. S. Michels), 

91, Meshoppen, Pa. 
Bond, Precilla, M. 89, No. 310 Race street, 

West Pittston, Pa. 
Bond, Sadie E., 86. No. 310 Race St., West 

Pittston, Pa., teacher. 
Borden, Mettie (Mrs. C. H. Goss), 93, Ger- 
mania, Pa. 
*Bosard, Florence H. (Mrs. W. R. Bieriy), 69. 
Bosard, Jas. H., 66, Grand Forks, N. Dak., 

lawyer. 
Boughtin, Harriet. 97, Tioga, Pa., teacher. 
Bowen, Albert T., 96, Cherry Flats, Pa., 

Bowen, Bessie (nee Mrs, William Jenkins), 
96. East Charleston, Pa. 

Bowen. Stephen E., 89, Ridgway, Pa., mer- 
chant. 

Boyce, Eliza J., 79, Mansfield, Pa., teacher 
S. N. S. 

Boyce, Josephine. 94, Tunkhannock, Pa., 

Boyce, Mary Ann, 93, Tunkhannock, Pa., 

Boyd, Margaret, 86,Wyalusing, Pa., teacher. 
Bradford, B. G., 95, Sylvania, Pa., teacher. 
Bradford, C. M., 97, Sylvania. Pa., teacher. 
Bradway, William D., 96, Canoe Camp. Pa., 

teacher. 
'Braine, Artemus D., 70, Canton, Pa., dealer. 



7o 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



Brandt, Helen O. (Mrs. W. S. Peterson), 71, 
Rapid City, Black Co., Dakota, 

Breldinger, Jacob P.. St B S91, (Grad. La- 
fayette), Vice-Principal S. N. S., Mans- 
field, Pa. 

Brennan, Joseph E., 91, 153 S. Main St., Car 
bondale, Pa., law student, Scranton, 
Pa. 

Breon. Charles D.. M. 96, Mansfield, Pa. 

Brewer, Emma A., 00, Binghamton, jn.Y., 
teacher. 

*Brewster, Addie, 83. 

Brewster, D. Truman, 73. Montrose, Pa., 
lawyer. 

Brewster, Eliza J., 70. Montrose,Pa,. teacher 

*Brewster, Fannie (Mrs. Sheldon M. Foster), 
80. 

Brewster. Flora A., M. D., 75. Baltimore.Md. 

Brewster, Fred D., M. D., Tl, No. 204 Wyom- 
ing Ave., Scranton. Pa. 

Brigden. Charles A., 87, Chatham Valley, 

Brigden, Emma, 88, Chatham Valley, Pa., 

t,AC* pVl pr 

Brigden, Myrtle. 90, Chatham Valley, Pa. 

teacher. 
Briggs. Charles W„ 89, Keeneyville, Pa., 

teacher. 
Briggs, Mary J. (Mrs. Frank Story), 60. 
Briggs, Rufns M.. 7'8, Jennings, La., travel- 
ing agent. 
Broadbent, Anna, 90, No. 3M Bromley Ave., 

Scranton. Pa., teacher. 
Brock. Mamie E.. 91, Knoxville. Pa..teacher. 
Broderick, Clarence Ray, 92, Roseland, Net>., 

fpo plipr 
Brooks, Ella May (Mrs. Arthur C. Sidman), 

90, Hornellsville. N. Y. 
Brooks, Lee, 87, Canton, Pa., lawyer. 
Brown, Mrs. A. G. (nee Ora Ruth Adams). 89, 

Gaines, Pa. 
Brown, CandaceH., E 85, S 90, Hopbottom. 

Brown, Edith Llle, 9T, Forest City, Pa., 

teacher. 
Brown, Eleanor J., 91, Lehman.Pa., teacher. 
Brown. Ernest W., 82, Whitesville, N. Y., 

teacher. 
Brown. Frances E., 74, Leona, Pa. 
Brown, Freemont M., 77, Reynoldsville, Pa., 

civil engineer. 
Brown, Jay F., 71, Cleveland, Ohio, county 

surveyor. 
Brown, Jenny Lind, 90, Wyalusing, Pa., 

teacher. 
Brown, Mella A.. 89. Hopbottom.Pa., teacher 
Brundage, Ena L... 84,Peckville, Pa. .teacher. 
Buchanan, Mattie J . Mi. Wanesburg, Pa. 
Buchanan, Robert 91. Parsons. Pa. 
Buck. Lena A.. 95. Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 
Buckbee, Anna 77 Harrisburg.Pa.. lecturer 
Buckbee, Jared H., 79, Elklahd, Pa., mer- 
chant. 
Buckley, Charles, 93. Stony Fork, Pa,,teach-i 

er. Philadelphia, Pa. 



Buckley, Ruth rMrs. Dennis Navel), 94, 
Wellsboro, Pa. 

Bull, Alice V., 95, Mansfield, Pa. 

Bull, Emily L., 80. Wilkes Barre, Pa. .teacher. 

Bull, James R , 91, Milford, Pa., teacher. 

Billiard. Lloyd G., 88, insurance agent, Sun- 
bury, Pa. 

♦Bullard, Mrs. Lloyd G. (nee Jessie F. Pal- 
mer) 80. 

Bullard. Mrs. Lloyd G. (nee Edna Willis 
Adams), 89, Sunbury, Pa. 

Bullard, Mrs P. M (nee Kate E. Horlacher), 
79, Newberry, Pa. 

Bullock, Leila M. '(Mrs. George W. Coveney), 
77, Mardin. Pa. 

Bullock, Minnie (Mrs. Rev. John Kimball),84, 
Turners Center, Maine. 

•Bullock. Susie M. (Mrs. Clarence S. Wood- 
ruff). 79. 

Bunnell. Isaac C, 80, No. 40 Water St., Bos- 
ton. Mass., life insurance. 

Bunnell, Lucy (Mrs. J. T. Smith). 80, Mont- 
rose, Pa. 

Bunnell, Rose M.,95, Meshoppen,Pa..teacher. 

Bunyen. Mrs. Jno. (nee Jennie Warren), 90, 
Canton, Pa. 

Burch, Mrs. M. P. (nee Vira Lowe), 87, White 
River, Colo. 

Burdick, Harvey Lee, 84, No, 1022 Capouse 
Ave., Scranton, Pa., principal gram- 
mar school, 

Burdick, William H., 89 Franklin, Mass., 
book keeper. 

Burdick, Mrs. Win. H. (nee Ida S. Medley), 

89, Franklin, Mass. 

Burdick. Mrs. Ralph E. (nee Alice R. Munn), 
89 Smethport, Pa. 

Burgess, Ettie May, 90,Lovelton, Pa. .teacher. 

Burke. Margaret Teresa, 93. No. 137 North- 
ampton. St. .Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. 

♦Burley. George Wells, 82. 

*Burman. O. W., 80. 

Burman, Mrs, O. W., 88. Lenoxville, Pa., 
. teacher. 

Burnham, Eliza J., 09, Melbourn, Austra- 
lia, missionary editress. 

Burr, Mrs. A. T. (nee Katharine Belle Grif- 
fith). 93. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Burrett, Florence. L., 91. Sylvania, Pa. 

Barrett, Mary Esther, 94, Sylvania, Pa. 

Burrltt. Eugenia H.. 90, Jermyn, Pa. .teacher. 

Burton, Mrs. Edw. (nee Emma E. Parks), 70, 
Mansfield. Pa. 

Bush, Florence E.. (Mrs. Samuel Ludlam), 

90, Academy Corners, Pa. 

Bush, Maud A., 97, Westfleld, Pa., teacher. 
Butler, Mrs. Judd A. (nee Alice Treat), 91, 

Osceola, Pa. 
Butler, Mrs. Rev. T. D. (nee R Lena Morse), 

E 71, S 79, Abington, Knox Co., 111. 
Butler, William George, 97, Blossburg, Pa., 

teacher, 
guttles, Frank E., 60, No. 68 W. 127th St., 
£ New York City, teacher. 
♦Buttles, Permelia (Mrs. E. P. Balch), 69. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



7* 



"I 



Byrne, Julia A., 84, Carbondale,Pa., teacher Case, Gertrude, 04, Ulysses, Pa., teacher. 

In Wood's Commercial College. Case, Carrie E. (Mrs. A. D, Howe),<6,Whites- 

CafTrey, Julia, 87. No. 471 Hazel Ave., I ville, N. Y., teacher. 

Wilkes Barre. Pa., teacher. Cass, Marion F„ 72, Klkland, Pa., teacher. 

Callender, Jennie E., (Mrs. Harvey D.Wood), Casterlin, Walter Sterling, 93, Orange, Pa., 

84, Arnot, Pa. teacher. 

Callender, Mary L., 86,Peckville,Pa., teacher Catlin, Edson J., 88, Wellsboro, Pa., hook 

Cameron, Samuel Pollock, 94,Houtzdale,Pa. keeper. 

Cameron, Susie Glenn, (14, Houtzdale, Pa., Catlin, Joel D , 88, Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 

teacher Catterson, Alden Dudley, 91, Moscow, Pa.. 

*Camp, Electa (Mrs. M. L. Hall), 66. ' teacher. 

Camp. Margaret E. (Mrs. D. W. Dodson), 87. Cawley, Anna Dominica, 93, Pittston, Pa., 

Hartford, Conn. I teacher. 

Campbell, Mrs. C. B. (nee Eunice Howland).; Cawley, Jennie M., 91,Pittston, Pa., teacher. 

73 Nelson Pa iChampney, Loren Rensselaer, 92, Millerton, 

Campbell, James Curtis, 85, Wilkes Barre,| Pa., teacher. „.__..,_ 

Pa . chief clerk D. & H. Coal Co. Chapin, Clementine, 96,White's Corners,Pa., 

Campbell, Mrs. J. C. (nee Tillie VanAman),! teacher. 

87, Wilkes Barre, Pa. Chapin, Delwin D., 69, HarnsorTValley, Pa., 



Burlington, Pa. 



Campbell J. Herbert, 

merchant. 
Campbell, Jessie O. (Mrs.Harry T. Melville) 

89, Luther's Mills, Pa. 
Capell, Mrs. William H. (nee Anna G. Peck) 

83, Mansfield, Pa. 
Capwell, Maud S.. 88, Bonita. Cal., teacher. | Church. Nathan W., M. D„ 89 Ulysse 
Carbine, Elizabeth Emilda, 94, Pittston, Pa.. Clark, Budd Albert, 92, Mansheld,! a., 



lumoerman and merchant. 
Cb»pman, Jessie G., 88, Espyville, Pa., 

Chapman, Nellie, 90, Espyville, Pa., teacher. 
Christian, Bertha Z., 86, Laceyville, Pa., 
teacher. 

Ulysses, Pa. 
clerk. 



Clark, Colin Burr. 83. Antrim, Pa., teacher. 
. Professor of Horticulture Clark, Fannie M., 96, Mansheld, Pa., teacher 



0, 



teacher 
Card Fred VV u 

University of Nebraska. Lincoln, Neb. Clark, Mrs. Elwood (nee Amanda Voorhess), 
Card, Mrs. James R (nee Florence L. Bwt. 85, foot E. 128th St., New "iork City. 

rett), 91, Sylvania, Pa. Clark, Mrs. P. B„ 88, .t.ansfield.Pa 

Carley. Carrie M. (Mrs. Newton M. Beach), Clark, Mrs. F. W. (nee Leha s. Cole), 

91, Mansfield, Pa. | Mansfield Pa 

Carley, Franc E. (Mrs. Chester R. Gallup). Clark, Hartvvell, 92, Easton, Pa , lawyer. 

85 Glen Hazel Pa Clark, Howard Beach, 90, Addison, N. Y„ 

Carley,' Hattie G„ 89, Job's Corners, Pa.,i postal clerk, A & P. Railway. 

teacher Clark, Jay Hiram, 85, No. 1433 Market St., 

Carlin, Martha J. (Mrs. Earnest Lott), 90, Harrisburg Pa., railway postal clerk. 

Auburn Four Corners. Pa. Clark, Mrs. Jay H (nee Elizabeth Wyhe),85, 

Ciirlin, Mary A., 92. Auburn Four CornewJ No. 1433 Market St.. Harrisburg, Pa. 

Pa teacher Clark, Mrs. J. Miller (nee Minnie E. Cogs- 

Carlton. Florence E., 85, Newfoundland, Pa., 1 . well), 86. Mansfield, Pa. 



Lake View, Pa., 



Pa., 



Clark. Rosamond, 72, Academy Corners,Pa., 

Clark, Sarah F., 76, Athens, Pa , teacher. 
Clemens, Mrs. Frank L. (nee Ida M. Ely), 81, 

Corning. N. Y. 
Clemens, Helen Carter (Mrs. J. H. Davis),87, 
No. 56 Bronson St.. Waterbury, Conn. 
Cleveland.Mrs.Carl (nee Anna Erdine Good- 
all), 93. Mansfield. Pa. 
No 73 Church St., Clifford, Rose L., 93, Scranton, Pa., teacher 
teacher. Ollinenson, Frances M., 68. 



teacher. 
Carpenter, Daniel E 

postal clerk. 
Carpenter, Hanson, 88, Scranton, Pa. 
Carpenter, J. Wheaton, 73, Scranton 

lawyer, 
Carpenter, Philip T., 89. Little- Marsh 

teacher. 
Carr, Mary J., 66. Brooklyn, N. Y., teacher. 
Carrlck, Maggie H., 86. 

Wilkes Barre, Pa.. v> 
Carroll, Bridget Agnes, 9", No. 925 Scranton Clinton, Mary A., 89, Ashley Pa. teacher. 



Pa., 



St., Scranton, Pa., 
Carroll, Gertrude, 97. 
teacher. 



teacher Cloos. Mrs. Sarah L. (Mrs. H. B. Colegrove), 

' Wilkes Barre, Pa., 91, Lawrenceville Pa. 

Close, Angie J (Mrs. Oliver Benj. Blanch- 
Carroll.Mrs. Rev. P. P. (nee Carrie O.Faulk-l ard), M 89, Farmington Hill, Pa. 

ner) 83 Cuba N Y Close, Carrie H. (Mrs. Frank M. Leonard),86, 

Carter, Annie J. (Mrs. F. P. Hatch),86,Union Wellsville N Y 

City Pa iClose. Cora L. (Mrs. George S. Trim), 78. 

Carter.Ke'rn R.,80,South Auburn, Pa. .farmer! Westfield, Pa. 

Carver, Mrs. A. S. (nee Ella E. Rowe), 75, Close, Hattie D. (Mrs. Dr. W. A. Shappee),^, 
Breckinridge, Texas. Xenia, Ohio. 



72 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



Close, Mari (Mrs. G.A King),78,Westfleld,Pa. 
Cloud, Mrs. A. D. (nee M. Agnes Degan). 85, 

Eaton, Washington Co., N. Y. 
Cobb, William H.. 89, Spring Mills, N Y., 

farmer and dealer. 
Coddington.Mary EnimalMrs.Carl Schmidt), 

90, N. Main St., Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
Cochran. Albert M , 97, Williamsport, Pa., 

Cogswell, Carrie, 89, West Auburn, Pa., 

Cogswell, Minnie L. (Mrs. J. M. Clark), 86, 

Mansfield, Pa. 
Cole. Ada F. (Mrs. Eev. D. McGregor), 71, 

Stevensville, Montana. 
Cole, Mrs. Irwin W. (nee Nellie E. Backer), 

M. 85, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Cole, Lelia S. (Mrs. F. W. Clark), 70, Mans- 
field, Pa. 
Colegrove, Mrs. A. D. (nee Emma Hulslan- 

der), 81, Liberty, Pa. 
Colegrove, Mrs. H. B. (nee Mrs. Sarah L. 

Cloos), 91, Lawrenceville. Pa. 
Coleman. Mrs. Frank A. (nee Harriett Elou- 

ise Updyke), ,88, Sheffield. Pa. 
Collins, Isaac P.. 81.Coudersport,i-a.,lawyer 

Collins, Merton R..9-i,(Grad. Bucknell),Roar- 

ing Branch. Pa. 
Colwell, Mrs. Andrew J. (nee Mary J. Doo 

little), 8(1, Hickory Grove, Pa. 
Compton, Ed. A., 80, Stockville, Neb., Judge 

of Frontier County. 
Conard, Emarene (Mrs. W.W. Powers), 07, 

Bennett's Square, Pa. 
Conard, Marie W., 67, New London, Pa. 
Conard, Sue E., 60, New London, Pa. 
Congdon, Charles H., 76, St. Paul, Minn., 

Supt. of Music, city schools , 639 St. 

Anthony Avenue. 
Conklin, Lena, 89, Orwell, Pa., teacher. 
( onion. Peter J., 89, Hudson, Pa„ teacher. 
Conners, Mrs. J.D. (nee Anna Fogarty), 87, 

Morris Run, Pa. 
Cook, Ada R., 88. Meshoppen, Pa., teacher. 
Cook, Estella G. (Mrs. Fred C. Leonard), 74, 

Coudersport. Pa. 
Coon. Claude L . 95, Hawley, Pa., teacher. 
Coon, Melvin, 97, West LeRoy, Pa., teacher. 
Cooper, Carrie A. (Mrs. Wilbur H. Morris), 

89, Tunkhannock, Pa. 
Cooper, Lena A., 95. Lamb*s Creek, Pa., 

tpo phpr 

Cope, John G., 67, Bloomsburg, Pa., Vice- 
Principal S. N. S. 

Copeland, Mrs. Jas. G. (nee Laura E. Crut- 
tenden). 79, Bluff City, Kan. 

♦Copeland, Merthina F. (Mrs. W. M. Hatch), 
70. 

Copestick, John G., 96, Stony Fork, Pa , 

Copley, Rena, 95,Crooked Creek.Pa., teacher. 
Corey, Althea S., 87, Mill City, Pa., teacher. 
Corey, Harry B., LL. B„ 84, Coryland, Pa., 
lawyer. 



Cornell, Ferris D., 91, Pike's Creek, Pa. .cler- 
gyman. 

Cornell, Mrs. Rev. Ferris B. (nee Luna Eve- 
lyn James). 91, Pike's Creek, Pa. 

Cornw'ell, Julia E.,95.Mansfteld,Pa.,teacher. 

Cortright, Mrs. (nee Carrie Ansley),8S, Gale- 
ton, Pa. 

Cory, Mrs. Nelson S. (nee Kate H. Whipple, 
M. D.), 68. Akron, Olio 

Costello, Mame G. (Mrs. George Steigmaier), 
86, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Costley, Byron J., 79, No. 96 Diamond St.. 
Pittsburg, Pa., lawyer. 

Coursen, Emma A. (Mrs. E. L. Crisman), 83, 
Kingston, Pa. 

Coveney, Mrs. Geo. W.uiee Lelia M.Bullock), 
77, Mardin, Pa. 

Cox, Mrs. Frank S. (nee Cora Belle Smith), 
90, M, 91, Binghamton, N. Y. 

Cox, Mary A.. 87. Parsons, Pa., teacher. 

*Coxey, Mrs. Carrie (nee Carrie Amerman), 
M. 71. 

Coyle, Bessie, 86, Bay Ave., Bloomfield, Is. J. 

Coyle, Mannie (Mrs. W. S. Hulslander), E 77, 
S 77, Scranton. Pa. 

Coyle. M. Frances,90, Nicholson, Pa. .teacher 
at Pittston, Pa. 

Crandall, Susan B. (Mrs. Knapp),69,Stevens- 
ville, Pa. 

Crawford, Etta, 89, Silvara, Pa., teacher. 

.Crawford. Lou J. (Mrs. Byron A. Havens), 
76, Seattle, Wash. 

Crawshaw. Elizabeth Maria, 93, Daleville, 

Cray, Anna E„ 88, No. 90 Cortright Ave., 

Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. 
Cray, Daniel J., 91, No. 90 Cortright Ave., 

Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. 
Crediford, Mrs. O. E. (nee Addie L. Reese), 

79, Antrim, Pa. 
Cress, Ada, 96, Avery, Pa., teacher. 
Crisman. Mrs. E. L. (nee Emma A. Coursen), 

83, Kingston, Pa. 
Cronk, Martha M., 96, Fairdale.Pa , teacher. 
Crossley, Charles R., 94, Mansfield, Pa. 
Crowell, Blanche (Mrs. Rev. J.Nicholson),88. 

Binghamton, N. Y. 
Cruttenden, Alice G., 83, Wellsboro, Pa., 

tPflifllGF 

Cruttenden. Edwin A., E 83, S 88, Scranton, 
Pa., teacher Business College. 

Cruttenden, Mrs. E. A. (nee Helen Phillips), 
90, Scranton, Pa. 

Cruttenden, Grace E., M 91, Wellsboro, Pa. 

Cruttenden, Laura E. (Mrs. James G. Cope- 
land). 79, Bluff City, Kan. 

Culver, Sadie Helen, 94, Round Top, Pa., 

fpO o TlPT* 

Cummings, Ida Belle. E 82, M 91, Mansfield, 

Pa., deputy postmaster. 
Cunningham, Jennie T., 96, Mansfield, Pa., 

Curtis, Effle Delle, 94,Elmhurst,Pa„teacher. 
Curtis, Laura M., 86,Aldenville, Pa., teacher. 
dishing, Minnie E., 91, Ulysses, Pa.,teacher. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



73 



Cyphers, Effa M., 86, Wilkes Barre, Pa., 

1"P3iPl 1PT" 

Cyphers, Jennie, 8*, Falls, Pa., teacher. 

Dailey, Elizabeth, 88, Elmira, N. Y.. teacher. 

Dailey, Lettie J„ 79, Tioga. Pa., teacher. 

Dallman, Walter Henry, 91, Elmira, N. Y. 

Dalton, James Curtis, 96, C P a;, Mansfield. 
Pa., student S. N. S. 

Dana, Emma H.. 84, Eaton, Pa., teacher at 
Mauch Chunk, Pa. 

Dana, Mary, 90, Eatonville. Pa., teacher. 

Danlell, Emily, M 86, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Darby, Mittie, A 96, Hoytville. Pa. 

Darling, Alice E. (Mrs. V. K. Pratt), 08, Rey- 
noldsville, Pa. 

Darling, Walter C , 79, Ebenton. Pa., lumber- 
man. 

Darmstadt, Kate, 89,Nellore, India, mission- 
ary. 

Deane. Eunice L., 97. Roulette, Pa., teacher. 

*Dartt. Hannah I. (Mrs. F. Holden), 06. 

Dartt. Morton Lyman, 90. principal Union- 
town S. O. S., Jumonville, Pa. 

Davidson, Sarah E.,96,Passaic.N.J .teacher. 

Davies, Anette Roland, 93, Scranton, Pa. 

Davies, John R.,95,Cherry Flats,Pa., teacher. 

Davis, Amy A. (Mrs. Joseph Schusler), 67, 
Mansfield, Pa. 

Davis, Anna L. (Mrs. A. G. Guiles), 87, Law- 
renceville. Pa. 

Davis, Bertha Mae, 94, Morris Run, Pa., 

Davis, David C. .91. Wilkes Barre.Pa.,teacher 
Davis, David D.. 89, Arnot, Pa., clerk. 
Davis, Elizabeth J., 95.Antrim. Pa., teacher. 
Davis, Elizabeth S., 94, Pike's Creek, Pa , 

teacher. 
Davis, Ella. 94. Pike's Creek, Pa., teacher. 
Davis, Emily, 96, Pike's Creek, Pa., teacher. 
Davis, Frederick George,93,MorrisRun,P»., 

student Philadelphia Dental college. 
Davis, Mrs. Fred (nee Cora E. Baynes), 90, 

Davis, Mrs. J.H.(nee Helen Carter demons), 
87.No. 56 Bronson St..Waterbury,Conn. 

Davis, Robert. 95, Wanamie, Pa., teacher. 

Davis, Sarah, 95, Lynn, Pa., teacher. 

Day, Edna E., 96, Corning, N. Y.. teacher. 

Dayton, Mrs. C. F. (nee Susie Hillis), 75, To- 
wanda, Pa. 

Dayton, Sophronia C. 94, Rush,Pa., teacher. 

"Dayton, Urania E. (Mrs. C. B. McKean), 
M.73. 

Dean, Lottie A. (Mrs. J. F. Saylor), 78, Lin- 
coln, Neb. 

Decker, Ida C. (Mrs. Dr. E. G. Drake), M. 73. 
Elmira, N. Y. 

Decker, Leah Maud, 94, Mansfield, Pa., 

1"PJ1 PtlPT* 

Degan, M. Agnes (Mrs. A. D. Cloud), 85, 
teacher, Easton. Washington Co., N. Y. 

Dietlen, Rose Agnes, 93, Mansfield, Pa., 
teacher. 

*Delap, Mrs. S. C. (nee Marion Kennedy), 67. 



Deming, Albert Ulysses, 94, Somer's Lane, 

Pa., teacher. 
Demorest, M. Annie (Mrs. A. D. Park), 75, 

Waverly, N. Y. 
i*Dennis, Mary H. (Mrs. Henry D. Barhight), 

87. 
Devany, Anna C, 88, Wilkes Barre, Pa., 

ton p]"jpT* 

Devaney, James J., 91, Wilkes Barre, Pa., 
tPctchcr 

Dewey, James A.. 82, Supt. of Schools, New- 
port township, Wanamie, Pa. 

Dewey, Mrs. James A. (nee Fannie Barnes). 
83, Wanamie, Pa. 

Dickerson, Virginia, 86, Springfield, Pa., 

tpn pllPT" 

Dickinson. Mrs. A. J. (nee Effie M. James), 

M. 71, Cedar Rapids. Iowa. 
Dilworth. George Llewellyn, 90, Newfound- 
land, Pa., teacher. 
Ditchburn, Elizabeth, 97, Arnot, Pa. .teacher. 
Doane, Alice Horton, 94, Blossburg, Pa., 

teacher. 
*Doane, Alice J., 74 

Doane, Allen A., 76, Leona, Pa., farmer. 
Doane, Mrs. Allen A. (nee Grace E. Berry), 

80, Leona, Pa. 
Doane, Augusta Ellen, 94, Leona, Pa., 

tpjiclisr 
Doane, E. Josephine. 97, Mansfield, Pa., 

Tpfi plipr 
Doane, Ellen' R. (Mrs. P. A. Stevens), 69, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Doane, Mrs. Fay (nee Etta French), 88, 

Knoxvtlle, Pa. 
Doane, George, 67, No. 404 Hoffman St., El- 
mira. N. Y., manufacturer. 
Doane, Jane C. (Mrs. A. S. Hooker), 67, Troy, 

Pa. 
Doane, Joseph C, E. 68, S. 77, Mansfield, Pa., 

farmer. 
Doane, Mrs. J. C. (nee Myra Horton), 69, 

Mansfield, Pa. 
Doane, Marta E., 77, Towanda, Pa., teacher. 
Dobson, Jessie (Mrs. Frank A. Dobson), 89, 

No. 46 Brown St., Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
Dobson, Mrs. Frank A. (nee Jessie Dobson), 

89 No. 46 Brown St., Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
Dobbins, William J., 96, Arnot, Pa., teacher. 
Dodson, Mrs D. W. (nee Margaret E.Camp), 

87, Hartford, Conn. 
Dolbeare, Mrs. Dr. Frederick L. (nee Emily 

M. Sandbach), 89, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Doolittle, Mary J. (Mrs. Andrew J. Colwell), 

86, Hickory Grove, Pa. 
Doran, Anna Izadore, 94, Susquehanna, Pa , 

teacher. 
Dorsett, Edward B., 96, Lamb's Creek, Pa., 

Dorsett, Earnest M., 96, Mansfield, Pa., 

tPeichGr 
Dorsett, Harry, 97, Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 
Doud, Dornah, 96, Mainesburg, Pa., teacher. 



74 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Dougherty, Sarah Genevieve, 91, Instructor Ellsworth, Milton W., 68, Harrisburg, Pa., 

in InternatlonalCorrespondenceSchool book publisher. 

Scranton Pa ,Ely, Bessie Helena, 93, Mansfield, Pa., clerk. 

•Doumaux, Mrs. L. (nee Ada L. Bailey), 09. jEly.EvaL. (Mrs. Stewart Itiley), 80, Spring- 
Doyen, Agnes, E 88, A 94, Chicago, 111. field, Pa. 
Doyen, Anna, M. D.. 83,No. 1090 W. Harrison Ely, Fred Lewis, 93, Mansfield, Pa., clerk. 

St., Chicago, 111. Ely, Ida M. (Mrs. Frank L. Clemons), 81, 

Drake, Mrs. Dr. E. G. (nee Ida C. Decker), 1 Corning, N. Y. 

51 78 Elmira, N. Y. Ely, William F., 88, Lansford. Pa., teacher. 

Dugan Ce'lia, 97. Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. Bmberger, Joseph, 85. Mardin, Pa., farmer. 
Dunsmore, A. F.. 95, Covington. Pa.,teacher. England, Esteha Ethel, 94, Blossburg, Pa., 
Dunsmore, Eft'a M., 87. Auburn Corners.Pa., teacher. 

Missionary at Pocitos, 118 Guanajuato. England, Mary. 95, Wellsboro, Pa., teacher. 

Mexico English, Joseph D.. 97, Peckville, Pa. .teacher. 

Dunsmore, Archibald M., 90, Glen Richey, English, Mary L., 80, Wellsboro,Pa.,teacher. 

Pa., teacher. English, Mrs. W. W. (nee Lydia Howe), 7i, 

Dunsmore. Andrew B.. 84, Wellsboro, Pa., Wellsboro, Pa. 

lawyer Erskme. AnnaBelle,94,Ballibay,Pa.,teacher, 

Dunsmore, Mrs. Andrew B. (nee Sadie E. Espy, Harl J., 94, Harmonsburg, Pa., mer- 

Ball), 85, Wellsboro, Pa. chant „„^. 

Dunsmore, AnnaM., 81, Arnot, Pa., teacher. EstaBrook, Mrs. A. G. (nee Ella V. Robinson), 
Dunsmore, James A., 93, Glen Richey, Pa.,: 89, Mt. Alton, Pa. 

student State College, Pa, Estabrook, Mame F., M 92, Bennington, Vt., 

Dunsmore, James G., 92, Harrisburg, Pa., music teacher. 

student State College, Pa. lEvans, Andrew J., 84, Ulysses, Pa , editor. 

Dunsmore. John C„ C P 90,Cherry Flats.Pa.! Evans, Anna Cornelia, 94, Blossburg, Pa., 
Dunsmore, Luella, 95, Glen Richey, Pa., teacher. 

teacher Evans, Elizabeth, 95, Wanamie,Pa., teacher. 

Durand, Clara S., 87, Towanda, Pa.,teacher. Evans, Ebenezer, 94, Wanamie, Pa., teacher. 
Durand. Cora B. (Mrs. A. M. Whipple), 85, Evans, George, 88, Wanamie. Pa., teacher. 

Laceyville, Pa. Evans, Mary Annie, 90, Wanamie, Pa., 

Durkin, Veronica Teresa,94,Carbondale,Pa., teacher. 

teacher Evans, May. 97. Blossburg, Pa., teacher. 

Eadie. Grace K., 90. Weatherly.Pa.. teacher. Evans, Reese D , 90, No. 105 Barclay St., New 
Eby Eleanor Hadden, 94, Toronto, Ontario,' York city, private Sec. Swift Beef Co. 

Canada. Evans, Sarah A., 88, Wanamie, Pa. .teacher. 

Eckerson, Ray. 89, Syracuse, N. Y. *Evans, Thomas E.. 85. 

Eckerson. Mrs. Ray (nee Alice M. Stevens). Evans, Mrs Thomas E. (nee Carrie A. Jag- 

90, Syracuse, N. Y. ger), 84, Stokesdale, Pa. 

Edson, Charles H., 70, Elmira, N. Y., bo»k Evans, Mrs. W. J. (nee Anna D. Williams), 

keeper. 89, No. USX S. River St., Wilkes Barre, 

*Edwaros, Anna (Mrs. W. T. Watson), 87. Pa. 

Edwards. Joseph H., 80, No. 2020 State St , Everett, Alice A. (Mrs. W. L. Sprague), M 73, 

Chicago, ill., Assistant Supervisor Ca-i Buffalo, N. Y. 

ble Railway Ewing, Ella, 84, Espeyville, Pa., teacher. 

Edwards. Thomas H.. 71. Kansas City, Mo., Fairclough, Elizabeth,92,Yates,Pa, teacher. 

lawyer Fanning, Adelbert ('., 72. Troy, Pa., lawyer. 

Edwards Wm. C, 74, Lamed, Kansas, law- Fanning, David Joseph. 94, Troy, Pa., stu- 



yer. 



dent. 



Edwards', Mrs. W. C. (nee Franc C.Mltchell), Fanning, Florence Anns, 94, Wetona, Pa., 

77, Larned, Kansas. teacher. 

Eddy L Pearl, 96, Ulysses, Pa. [Farrer. Anna R. (Mrs. J. E. Reese), 79, 

Elliott, Addle M. (Mrs. Charles B. McKeani. Mansfield, Pa. 

75 Santa Clara. Colo. Farrer. Jennie E. (Mrs. A. H. Avery), 76, 

Elliott, Edward Martin. E 90, S92, (Grad. Mansfield, Pa. 

Lafayette). Mansfield, Pa.Jaw student. Farrer, Mrs. Thos. D. (nee Edith M. Strait), 
Elliott Mrs. Dr Fred G. (nee Julia E. Hart- 89, Boise City, Idaho. 

lev) 75 Mansfield, Pa. Farrer, Will S„ 80, Mansfield, Pa. .merchant. 

Elliott Jessie Gertrude,M 91, No. 2119 Curtis Fassett, MaryB., 91, Raymond, Pa., teacher. 

si Denver. Colo. Faulkner, Caroline Pearl, 93,Waverly, N.Y., 

Elliott, John F.. M. D., 75, Idaho Springs, 1 teacher. 

(j lo Faulkner, Carrie O. (Mrs. Rev. P. P. Car- 

Elliott Olive M., 73, Mansfield, Pa., teacher. roll), 86, Cuba, N. Y. 

Elliott. Willis Victor, 91, No. 2119 Curtis St.. Faulkerson, Arta, 92, Wellsboro, Pa. .teacher. 

Denver. Coin., lawyer. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Fensler.Elizabeth M. (Mrs. Louise Krouse). 87, 
No. 128 Washington Ave, Altoona, Pa. 

Ferguson. Mrs. C. W. (nee Georgiana Trow- 
bridge), 85, No. 526 Gray St., Elmira, 
N. Y. 

Ferguson, John, .89, Susquehanna, Pa., law- 
yer. 

Ferry, Leon B., 91 . Wellsboro, Pa., lawyer. 

Fessenden ,R.A.,87. Livingstone Place,New 
York city, traveling salesman. 

Fessler. Mrs.T.A.(nee Josephene Lawrence), 
E 89, M 92, Elkland, Pa. 

Fitzgerald, Mrs. Fred W.mee Eliza M.Miller), 
79, Waverly, N. Y. 

Fick, Levi J., 74, Room 2, Whitney Opera 
House, Detroit, Mich., lawyer 

Field, Cora M., 96, Ashley, Pa. 

Fitzpatrick, Anna Gertrude, 93, Mansfield. 
Pa. 

Fletcher, Mrs. V.' (nee Ella M. Smith), 8i, 
Mainesburg, Pa. 

Flower, Edith, M. D.. 91, Corning, N. Y., res- 
ident surgeon Woman's Hospital, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. 

Flynn, Mary L., 90, No. 409 Ninth St., Scran- 
ton, Pa., teacher. 

Fogarty, Anna (Mrs. J. D. Conners), 87, Mor- 
ris Run, Pa. 

Foote, Lewis K., 86, Annin Creek, Pa., 

Foote, Mrs. Lewis K. (nee Ina V. Spencer), 

86, Annin Creek, Pa. 
♦Foster, Mrs. Sheldon M. (nee Fannie Brew 

ster), 80. 
Fowler, M. Edna, 96,Scranton, Pa., teacher. 



Gallagher. Mary Josephine,91. Wilkes Barre, 
■Do tpcicliBr 

Gallagher. Rose B., 87, No. 59 Hillside St., 
Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. 

Gallup. Mrs. Chester R. (nee Franc E. Car- 
ley), 85, Glen Hazel, Pa. 

Gardner, Chester B , LL. B., 73, Scranton, 
Pa., lawyer. 

Gardner. John Adrian, 87, Andrew's Settle- 
ment, Pa. 

Gardner. Truman G., 92, Westfleld, Pa.,cler- 
gyman. 

Gardner, WinfieldS., 79, Montdale, Pa., gen- 
eral agent. 

Garey, E. S., 95. Jenningsville, Pa., teacher. 

Garrahan, Frances Y„ 92, No 395 E. Market 
St., Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. 

Garrison. Cornelius P., 89, DuBois, 

Gates, Burt K.. 89, West Superior, Wis. 
Gates. Maud Ella, 92, S 96, Mansfield, 

tpQ Pl"|Pl* 

Gault. Mrs. Dr. Matthew B. (nee Frances M. 

Wright, M. D.). 67, Markleton, Somer- 

sft Oo Pel 
Gavigan, Lizzie A. (Mrs. John W. Hyde), 

79, Elmira. N. Y. 
Geier, Ida M., 96, Ulysses, Pa. 
Geoghan, Mary E.. 82. Ashley, Pa., teacher. 
Gibson, John Cushing,95, Mansfield, Pa.,law 

student and merchant. 
Gibson, Margaret Ellen, 94, Mansfield, Pa., 

#-po pill- 1 J" 

Gallagher, Helen V., 97, Wilkes Barre, Pa„ 
teacher. 



Pa., 



Pa.. 



Fralic, Walter R„ 97, Lamb's* CreeCpa.i'iGaymanrAnna M., 97, Philadelphia, Pa., 

Frances^Val'ter R MD 71 Marion Ind. Gibson, Anna T„ 96. Mansfield, Pa. teacher. 
?F^ck Mrs. H 6 C. »Vee ATicefeweaver,, M 73. GUBride, Michael £.«U*3*K*g .teacher. 
French Beni. G., 89, Harford. Pa., teacher. .Gile, Norman Clark, 92, Lamb s cieek, Pa., 
French, Charles R., 91. Trowbridge, Pa., 



tPHCllGI* 

French, Elmer, L., 85, Mehoopany. Pa. 
French, Etta (Mrs. FayDoane),88 Knoxville, 

Pa 
Frick, Charles, 88, Liberty, Pa., teacher. 
Friends, Mrs. Chas. H. (nee Louise J. 

Hollands), 71, Millerton, Pa 



Gillen, Mattie E., 91,Honesdale, Pa.,teacher. 
Gillespie, Agnes, 89, Pittston, Pa., teacher. 
Gillespie, Jessie Agnes, 94, Harford. Pa., 

Gillespie, Josephine G.,91,No. 195 Center St., 

Pittston, Pa., teacher. 
Gillespie, W. H., 87, Pittston, Pa., lawyer. 



TtOn la Urllieopit:, *v . jn., o<, I iitauuii, it,,., *wiy.j~- 

M tSS^ e ' E ' U Barrett) " SSS& ^y!TMrfiVK^ete(«, 
^^SSha^' p I i ad,ebUry ' Pa " teaC " er at Gillett K e ee "ass y ms , 'E. a 79, Nelson, Pa., officer 

» Wan?%? WftJSfSkcher GUletS; leMs.. M. D. 82, Savona N. V 
classical high school. Gilmour Anna F. (Mrs. Edgar kilbourn). 84, 

FUUer teac°her D - * Middlebur y Celltre ' ^•'IGiipi^Ml^nA.; 87, No. 10 Lowell St., Law- 
Furman, DeWittC, 75, No. 187 Addison Ave., . rence, Mass., f? 1 ^™™- .^.rf^,, 
Washington, Pa. principal schools. GUpta.Sherman F JLD.,»l>out Ste ling 1 a 
'- "",. Sands) 86. Gilpm. s. Ward, 92, Newfoundland, Pa., stu- 



Furman, Edna M. (Mrs. Frank E 

Scottdale, Pa. 
Gaige, E. B , 89, Jackson Summit, Pa. 
Gaige, Myra, 94, Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 
Gaige, Fred H., 97, Mansfield, Pa., teacher 



dent Bucknell. 
Gisin, Anna L., 91, Wellsboro, Pa., teacher, 
roodall, Anna Erdine (Mrs. Carl Cleveland), 
93, Mansfield, Pa. 



r 



7 6 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Goodall, M. R., M 73, Mansfield, Pa., carpen- 
ter and millwright. 

Goodall, Stella, E 91. S 94, C P 97, Ithaca, N. 
Y.. student. 

Goodall, Clara S., 97, Canoe Camp, Pa., 

Goodall' Edith S.. 98, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Goodrich, Edith R..93,Mansfield, Pa. .teacher 

Goodrich, Eugene Bruce, 94, Alford, Pa., 
teacher. 

Goodrich, Mary D (Mrs. William Reynolds), 
70. Elmira, N. Y. 

Goodrich. Mrs. O. D. (nee Dora N.Woodruff), 
74, Elmira, N, Y. 

Goodspeed, Julia L., 95, S97, C P 97, Mans 
field. Pa., student S. N. S. 

Goodspeed, Lyman Delos, 92, West Coving 
ton. Pa., farmer. 

Gordon, Nettie E., 90. Pine City. N.Y., teacher 

Gorliam, Elsie, 86, Coudersport. Pa. .teacher. 

Gorham, Fordyce C, 90, medical student 
University of Pennsylvania, Couders- 
port, Pa. 

Gorman, Chloe, 87, Hamilton, Pa., teacher, 

Gorrie, Clarence A., 74, Wellsboro, Pa., far- 
mer. 

Gould. Mrs. Dr. E. W. (nee Mary E. Lincoln. 
M. D.), 80, Thomaston, Me. 

Grabb, Ella M., 95, Herrick. Pa., teacher. 

Graves. Israel S., M. D., 82. Peckville. Pa. 

Gray, Florence S. (Mrs. William Lee), 73, Rus- 
sell, Kansas. 

Gray, Fred L., 78. 8ulliTOn ,~Pa. 

Gray, .1. M„ 89, DuBois, Pa., teacher. 

Gray, Mabel T.. 98. Troy, Pa., teacher. 

Gray, Mary E. . 90. Laceyville, Pa. 

Green, Benj. W., 68. Emporium, Pa., lawyer. 

Green, Ernest, 95, Keeneyville, Pa., teacher. 

*Green. Fanny (Mrs. M. Montgomery), 71. 

Green, Fred H., 91, Clifford, Pa., teacher. 

Green, Jennie May, 94, Troy, Pa., teacher. 

Green, W. F., 89, Rush, Pa., teacher. 



Grom, Leanore Allegra, 93, Pittsburg, Pa., 

teacher. 
Gross, Mrs. C. H. (nee Mettie Borden), 93. 

Germania. Pa. 
Guard, Carrie (Mrs. Robert B. Treible), 85, 

No. 59 So. Grand St., Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
♦Guernsey, Ella A., 75. 
Guiles, Mrs. A. G. (nee Anna L. Davis), 87, 

Lawrenceyille, Pa. 
Gunn, Ada, 90, Montrose, Pa., teacher. 
Haight, Cora A. (Mrs. J. Mert Smiley), 90, 

East Canton, Pa. 
Haight, Nellie J.. 97, Mansfield. Pa,,teacher. 
Hahn, Mary E„ 97, Meshoppen, Pa, teacher. 
*Haight, Fred R„ 89. 
"Haines, Lizzie M., 69. 
Hakes, Claudia B., 90. Lamb's Creek, Pa., 

Hall, Delia (Mrs. F. VanDusen), 85. 

Hall, Laura Z. (Mrs W. A. McFarland) , 75, 

Watson town, Pa. 
Hall, Leda (Mrs. Maxwell Henry), 80, Arnot 

Pa. 
Hall, Mina (Mrs. George Nares), 82, Corning, 

N. Y. 
*Hall. Mrs. M. L (nee Electa Camp), 66. 
Hammond, Lewis G., 89, Reed City, Mich., 

bank clerk. 
Hammond. Leone, 97, Galeton, Pa., teacher. 
Hanahue T. F. , 97, Olyphant, Pa., teacher. 
Hand, Aaron W., 75, No. 25 CourtSt.,Keene, 

N. H., clergyman. 
Handwerk, Marcus, 86, Germania. Pa., 

teacher. 
Hanlan, Michael John, 85, Honesdale, Pa., 

County Clerk of Wayne County. 
Hannah, Carrie Belle, 94, Hast New Milford, 

Pa., teacher. 
Hanyen. Fred C, 86, Waverly, Pa., teacher. 
Hanyen, M. Lou, 87. Rutland. Pa., teacher 

in Elmira, N. Y, 
Hardie. Elizabeth, 88,Mt. Afton.Pa.. teacher. 



Greene, Katharine M., E 85, S 86,Clifton Sta- Harding, Everett, 93, Centre Moreland, Pa. 

tion, Va., teacher in Pulaski, N. Y. teacher. 

Gregory, Alice Z.. 91 Prompton,Pa.,teacher. Harkness. Harry Clifton, M. D„ 90 Maines- 
*Gregory, Helen (Mrs.Dr.W.L.Walraven), 89. burg. Pa. 



Gregory, Mary E. (Mrs. Alexander Pollock), 
87. Antrim, Pa. 

Grenolds, Mrs. Byron (nee S. Josephine 
Bailey), 88, Elkland, Pa. 

Griesmer, Owen M., 70, Berlinsville, Pa. 

Grflln, Cora M., 95, Scranton, Pa. .teacher. 

Griffin, James O.. 73, Palo Alto. Cal. .instruc- 
tor in German at Leland Stanford Uni- 
versity. 

Griffith, Katharine Belle (Mrs. A. T. Burn, 
93, Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Griffith, Mary A. (Mrs. D. D. Roderick), 83, 
Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. 

Grinned, Mary Jane (Mrs. H. H. Bartholo- 
mew!, 'in. Wellsboro, Pa. 

Grist, Mrs. Thomas H. (nee Sarah A. Kern), 
08, Hayward, Sawyer Co., Wis. 

Grom, Catherine, (Mrs. Longfellow), 89, 
Bradford, Pa. 



Harrer. Warren Franklin, M. D., 89, East 

Point, Pa. 
Harrer. A. T.. 90, East Point, Pa , teacher. 
Harris, Charles E , 70, Lanesboro, Pa.. teacher. 
Harrison, Howard, 80. Borden, N. Y., School 

Commissioner Steuben County. 
♦Hartley. Emma Helen. 90. 
Harte, Ella L , 97, Carbondale, Pa., teacher. 
Hartley, J. Frank, 90, S 92,Cumberland,Md., 

teacher. 
Hartley, Julia E. (Mrs. Dr. Fred G. Elliott), 

75, Mansfield, Pa. 
Harvey, James, 87, Sayre. Pa., freight con- 
ductor, 
Hastings, T. Harry, 90, Harrison Valley, Pa., 

teacher. 
Haskin, Mrs, Dr. Herbert P. (nee Teresa 

Holmes Rockwell), 98, wiiiianisport.Pa 



r 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL— FIFTH DISTRICT 



77 



W 



Hatch, Mrs. F. P. (nee Annie J. Carter), 86, 

♦Hatch. Mrs. Win. U. (nee Merthina F.Cope- 

Havens. Mrs. Byron A. (nee Lou J. Craw- 
ford), 76, Seattle. Washington. 

Havden.Emma<Mrs.Stevens).H4,Elmhiirst.Pa 

Haves. MaryT. 96. Morris Run, Pa . tocner. 

Hayes. Emma O. (Mrs. Theo. F. Williams). 
73 Mansfield. Pa. . 

Hayes, Mrs. Nelson (nee Jennie M. Valen- 
tine). 84, NO. 156 McLean St, Wilkes 
Barre. Pa, 

Hazlett. Mrs J. C. (nee Mabel E. Howe), 81, 
Huntingdon, Pa. 

Hazlett, James E . 83, Nelson, Pa., farmer. 

♦Heacock. Martha, 68. 

Healy. Joanna. 87. No. 357 W. Fourth St„ 

Hearn, Mary Anne'. SO. Brooklyn.Pa .teacher. 
Hehering, Andrew J., 83, Orange, N. J„ 

pharmacist. . „, 

Heermans.Mattie. 96, Jackson Summit, Pa., 

Heermnns. Mary Elleta 93. Jackson Summit, 

Pa. . teacher. 
Heft Emily Reeve.91,Truckville,Pa, teacher. 
Heft.Luella aark.Ul.Truckville^a teadier. 
Heibeck. Mrs. Geo. (nee Anna M Williams). 

94, Strasburg. Pa. 
Henry. Mrs Maxwell (nee Leda Hall), HO, 

Arnot. Pa, . _ 

Heyler. Edward W. 88, WilUamsport, Pa., 

Heysham, Jennie E., 81. Nelson Pa. 
Heysham. Samuel R.. 81. No 59 Grant St 

HornellsvUle, N. Y.. conductor Erie Ry 
Hickcox. Evaline (Mrs. Samuel Pearson), 82, 

Wellsboro. Pa. 
Hickok, Carrie L„ 96, Troy, Pa., teacher 
Higgins, Eliza H„ 86, Somers Lane, Pa., 

*Hill Lizzie C (Mrs. L. L. Bailey). E 69, M 71. 

Hillis, Susie (Mrs. C. F. Dayton), 75, Towan- 
da. Pa. 

Hillis, Lora, 97, Rushville, Pa., teacher. 

Hillis Nellie, 97. Rushville, Pa., teacher. 

Hitchcock, Andrew B., 84, Knoxville, la, 
insurance. , T . 

Hite, Mrs. J. A.(nee Jennie Webster), 81, Lin- 
coln. Nebraska. 

Hoard. Harry Reed. E 92, S 94, Mansfield, 
Pa. (Graduate Lafayette). 

Hoard. Joseph S„ 71, Mansfield, Pa., general 

Hoban^Charies Francis, 94, Wilkes Barre, 

Pa., teacher 
Hodgson, Mary D. (Mrs. D. S. Jennings), 84, 

Anatone. Wash. ^ T 

Hoffman. Edith M., 92, No. 414 N. Franklin 

St , Wilkes Barre. Pa., teacher. 
Holcomb. George M., 96, Mainesburg, Pa., 

teacher. 
*Holden. Mrs. F. (nee Hannah I. Dart), bb. 
Hollands.Louise J. (Mrs.Charles H.Fnends), 

71, MUlerton, Pa, 



Hollands. Lucy M. (Mrs. Chas. S. Rockwell), 

78, Blossburg. Pa. 
Hollenbeck, Amos F., 77, Springfield, Colo., 

ltiw vcr 
Hollenbeck. Conrad, 69, Lincoln, Nebraska, 

lawyer. . . 

Holmes, Edward E.,81. Jackson.Pa,, dentist. 
Hornet, Frank. 91, W r yalusing, Pa. 
Hornet. Lida H„ 86.Wyalusiiig.Pa.. teacher. 
Hooker, Mrs. A. S. (nee Jane C. Doane), 6i, 

Troy, Pa. , ■« »« n 

Hooker. Ida E (Mrs. A. Baumann), E io. S 

79. Scranton, Pa. 
Hone Bernard J„ 91, Lovelton, Pa., lawyer. 
Horlacker Kate E (Mrs. P. M. Bullard), 79, 

Newberry. Pa. . , 

Horn beck, Carrie Louisa. 94. Dingman s 

Ferry, Pa., teacher. 
Horning. Ida M..93. Wellsboro. Pa. .teacher. 
Horton Belle C. (Mrs. Chas. Jupenlaz). ,9, 

Blossburg. Pa. 
Horton, Chas. 1L. 88, Clifford, Pa„ teacher. 
Horton Flora, 91, Job'sCorners.Pa., teacher. 
Horton, Helen B., 94, Harford, Pa„ teacher. 
Horton, Mary A., 75, Lawrenceville, Pa., 

Horton. Myra (Mrs. J. C. Doane), 69, Mans- 

Hortom Nellie Campbell (Mrs.Z. Clark Kim- 
ball), 94. Westfleld, Pa. 
Hotchkiss. John N.. 91, Lamb's Creek, Pa. 

Houelfwont, Adell. 86, Na 128 Prospect St., 
Binghamton, N Y., teacher. 

Howard, Bloomfleld H ,88, Auburn Centre, 
"L>o tiPticliGr 

Howe, Albert D„ 77, Whitesville, N. Y.,mer- 

Howe C v a an'v.. 96. Mansfield Pa., teacher. 
Howe, Mrs Albert D. (nee Carrie E. Case), 

76, Whitesville. N. Y. 
Howe, Emily E (Mrs. Oscar Richmond), ,8, 

Mansfield, Pa. TT 

Howe, Mrs. John (nee Luella L. Howe), 83, 

Howe, Luella L. (Mrs. John Howe), 83,Brad- 

i*nt'(i Pfi 
Howe, Lydia (Mrs. W. W. English), 71,Wells- 

Howe. Mabel E. (Mrs. J. C. Hazlett), 81,Hun- 
tingdon. Pa. _ 

Howell, Wm. Harry, 92, Round Top Pa , 
medical student, University or Penn. 

Howland, Eunice (Mrs. C B. Campbell), 73, 
Nelson, Pa. 

"Hubbard, Harriet L., 68. 

Hubbard, Wilson R„ 82,East Charleston.Fa. 

Hudson, Mary E„ 88, Seeley Creek, N. Tf „ 

Hudson?Mattie E. 82, Elmira, N. Y.. teacher 
Hughes, Alice. 87. Blossburg. Pa , teacher. 
Hughes Jennie. 95, Blossburg. Pa., teacher 
Hughes] Mary E., 67, Castine, Me., teacher 

Hiilslander S 'Emma (Mrs. A. D. Colegrove), 
! Liberty, Pa. 



78 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Ing- 
Pa., 



, S82, 



Huls, -H'-€3S?r M »«^o yl e)7 ewe K;%rs^iir *« B 

Hu m p 1 ,4:H^S t G.':M a D.,77, E , kl and,Pa '^TeachS-" 16 Be " e ' 9 °' HalStead < 
Hunt Emma B. (Mrs Frederick Moore), M ..Johnson Ella F 08 

auOSaSgPS^.&^wtaa. Ba<*neU)J JOh, T 1 : a ?to r r#a <Mr8lHa " l8TahOT) ' 

*Hunt S SK'I a 78 '. teaCher - J ° hn X ^ #n m t ee A L0u ^ Lyon) - 4 ' 

Huntington. Ellen, 92, North Bingham Pa I M?nn ATe - Mmnea P°"s, 

HurlbTcSrie L„ 88, Nelson, Pa., teacher. i^Taiiofgfnfp ffi* H ' E MetC8tt >' 78 < 
Hnr mnf §£££ B.,98,Westflel(l,Pa .teacher. Johnson Leontll-.iiiMansfleia Pa teacher 

Husted EEa^ A (Mm Homer F. Kmgsley). *Johnson.Lura E (Mrs. W. 6. Lent), 88. 
Husted' Sv 97 ManlflBlfl P» to, h „ Johnson. Mortimer Elliott, 94, Mansneld.Pa. 
Hustld.' mW' iTm^ \Mk"lf A ' J ° hn deritfet aUfl0 H - 83 ' N6W Warket - N ' H - 
Kirch). 08. 414 East Broadway, Toledo, Johnson. S. A., 87, Milford. Pa., teacher 

Hust ^hei- st c E "*«— ««^FS K*fc£irtfe^«E 

^^klintafc %T "^ M °° dy) ' 86 ' f "^ Acf^^fsneld, Pa., teacher. 
HutchefoS k Jem a le e 'E a a. 94, Blossburg, Pa l^teachef *' % ' Ch6rry FlatS * Pa "' 
Hyatt.M a r C s n BF.(neePhoeheStrong),M9 1 No '""^SJHSJsS?*!*' E H ' Asllcraft >' ^ 

-^^.as^iJL^r^^^^ TyrIngha " Ma8S " 

*Hym'es. gS-'T.: 88 T ' JJgSf g^'la A 95. Mansfield Pa .teacher. 

Ingham. Anna B (Mrs Samuel H. Jewell). vSMtS^VVw 616 ' Nl D " farmer ' 

nnghaVFrederSk W„ 70 JS Morton fvo^lV^?-^^ 

Jackson Frank S , 90, Ansonia. Pa..teacher. Mansfield Pa ' ( ^ Lafa y ette >< 

^^'.iSe^e^" 101 ^ ^^InSS 1"^ *■*««»>, 90, 
Jame nafof Ononis" Montrose ' Pa " P rinci " Jones,Solomon D.:95,'wellsboro.Pa.,teacher. 
Jam C£ S ' "■ Philii ^^ Pa. J ° n6S firoie P pttaS L "*">• "■ 
James 6 & (Mrs. A. J. Dickinson). M 71, ^ta^le^ ^ L ****>' 9 °' 

Jamef&a^ry'k , M. D . 84, Montrose. Pa **"&£££•£ ^Sffi PiUSt ° n ^ ' 
J ^, L ffitf8BS!K^ F B - C0 ™ ell) ' ^^£i.^MS'PlttstonAve, 
Jame tea M oher ° ' ' J5 ' " "' WflkeS Ba " e ' Pa ■ M» Joh » J ^ * p eckville. Pa., teacher. 

wj *s§»«&8^«« Phi,. ju ^ss^ ee Beue c Horto »^ 

*"" "!!!!-■ - -Weston, Ka -«^^eac^: "* *■ 
Je, 'TcS e pa; (Mr§ C ' T - BWdle) ' MKea T a y :,tea'cher TereSa ' "• WUkeS Barre ' 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



79 



Kearney, Rose H, 9a, Wilkes Barre, Pa 

Keefe, Katherine,95.Fall Brook,Pa , teacher 
Keeler, Margaret Baldwin 92. No 125 Haw- 
ley St.. Binghamton, N Y., teacher. 
Keeney. Agnes, 77, Keeneyville.Pa , teacher. 
Keeney I Florence A. (Mrs. F. M. Smith). 72. 

Castile N. Y. 
Keeney, Nettie E. (Mrs. R Wayland Clark) 

80, Stamford, N. Y. 
Kehler, Sherman I.. 89. (Grad. Cornell). 

Liberty. Pa., civil engineer. 
Kehler, William Mortimer, 93, Wellsboro, 

Pa., lawyer. 
Keiser, Aaron B. . 78, Winfleld.Pa .salesman. 
Kelley, Charles B., 88, Port Allegany, Pa.. 

principal of schools. 
Kelley, Clyde Lincoln, 90, West Covington, 

Pa., teacher. 
Kelley, Elizabeth Josephine, 94. Scran ton, 

Kelley. Emrnett M„ 82, Belfast. N. Y., cler- 
gyman. 

Kelley, Mark, 92, Black Creek, N. Y, clergy- 
man. 

Kelley, Nathaniel Roger, 91. West Coving- 
ton. Pa., teacher. 

Kelley, William A. 89, No. 110 West Tama- 
rack St. , Hazleton. Pa. , agent Swift 
Beef Co. 

Kelley.Beatrice Maria,93,No. 122 Kidder St., 
Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. 

Kelly, Marion. 90, LeRoy, Pa , teacher. 

Kelly, Nellie M . 91, No. 124 River St , Scran- 
ton. Pa , teacher. 

Kelly, William a., 88, Parsons. Pa., teacher. 

Kemp. Frank (Mrs D. L, Satterlee), 80. 
Jackson. Tioga Co.. Pa. 

Kemp, Herman H., 91, Elkland, Pa., mer- 
chant. 

♦Kennedy. George, 75. 

•Kennedy, Marion (Mrs. S C. Delap), 67. 

Kennedy. Stephen H., 76, Waukegan. Ill . 
lawyer, insurance and real estate. 

Kenny. John A., 89, No. 31 North St., Wilkes 
Barre, Pa . teacher. 

Kenny Maud Anna. 90, No. 31 North St.. 
Wilkes Barre. Pa , teacher. 

Kent, Edith V., 91, Dover, N. J. teacher. 

Kent, Lou C. (Mrs. Dr J. G. Wilson), 8i. 
Mont-ose. Pa 

Kenyon. Ada Hope, 90. Troy, Pa., teacher. 

Kern, Sarah A. (Mrs. Thomas H. Grist), 68. 
Havward, Sawver Co.. Wis 

Kibbe. Emma H, 96. North Bingham. Pa , 
teacher 

Kies, Henry H. 81, Coudersport, Pa. 

Kiesel. Anna 92. No. 515 Lackawanna Ave , 
Scranton. Pa., teacher. 

Kilbourne Mrs. Edgar (nee Anna F. Gil- 
mour). 84 DuBois, Pa. 

Kiley, Frank L.. M. D . 89. Gordon. Pa 

Kiley. John Hurlbut. M. D.. 82, Morris Run, 
Pa 

Kilmer. Mrs. Joseph (nee Eva McKinney),94, 
Elmira, N. Y. 



Kimbal!, Mrs. Rev. John (nee Minnie Bul- 
lock), 84, Turner's Center, Maine. 

Kimball, Mrs. Z Clark (nee Nellie Campbell 
Horton). 94, Westfleld, Pa. 

Kimberly, C. H. M 73, Oriskany Falls, N. Y, 

Kimble, Frank P.. 76, Honesdale, Pa., law- 
yer. 

King, Edna (Mrs. J. Wesley Beach), M 92, 
Mansfield, Pa. 

King, Lillian, 96, Columbia X Roads, Pa., 

King, Margaret Isadore, 96, Canton, Pa., 

King, Mrs. G. A. (nee Mari Close), 78, West- 

fhld. Pa. 
*Kingsland, Mary M., 77. 
Kingsley, Anna Kent. 91. S 93. Mansfield, 

Pa., teacher at Chester Springs. Pa. 
Kingsley, Clarence Lewis, 93, Painter Run, 

"Do tp'l ("'TiPr 

Kingsley] Harry Bailey. 93, Mansfield, Pa., 
miller. 

Kingsley. Mrs Homer F. (nee Ella A. Hus- 
ted). 71, Mansfield, Pa. 

Klnsey, Katharine Elile. M 92, Covington.Pa 

Kinsloe, S. E. Burke, 81, S 89, No. 2103 Dia- 
mond St., Philadelphia. Pa., teacher. 

Kinyon, Augustus, 83, Linda Yista. Cal., 
teacher. 

Kirch, Mrs. Frank A. (nee Ruth B. Husted), 
M. D., 68, 414 East Broadway ,Toledo,0. 

Klock, Martha May, 94, (Mrs.- Rev. W. B, 
Armington), Lawrenceville, Pa. 

Knapp, Allen H„ 88 (Grad. Harvard), Alton, 

N" "V tPflPtlPT* 

Knapp.' Lucy M. (Mrs. L. W. Webb), 67, 

Wellsboro, Pa. 
Knapp. Samuel Dense, 90, Harrington, Del., 

teacher. 
Knapp. Mrs. (nee Susan B. Crandall), 69, 

Stevensville, Pa. 
Knight. Susie A. Delphine, 90, No. 1547, Ca- 

pouse Ave, Scranton, Pa. 
Knowlton. Lillie (Mrs. D. W. Williams), SO, 

Denver, Colo. 
Knowlton, Matthew Scott, 94,Covington,Pa., 

teacher. 
Knowlton,SadieL.,95,Covington,Pa..teacher. 
*Knox, Mrs. C. H. (nee Sarah J. Shove), 66. 
•Koerner, Maine L., 83. 
Kohler. Lydia Ada, 91, Mardln, Pa. .teacher. 
Koon, Mary S , 97. Lawrenceville. Pa., 

Ipji pTipi* 

Krouse, Mrs. Louis (nee Elizabeth M. Fens- 

ler), 87. No. 135 Washington Ave., Al- 

toona, Pa. 
Krug. Edgar, M , 96, Williamsport, Pa., 

teacher. 
Krusen, Mrs. Richard (nee Sarah I. Lewis), 

71. Westtield, Pa. 
Lacey, Asa P..78,West Auburn.Pa., teacher. 
Lacey, Marion L. (Mrs. C. B. Whipple), 86, 

No. Ill Putnam Ave.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lacey. Raymond H., C P 96, Laceyvllle, Pa. 
Lain, E. Jennie (Mrs. Nesbitt). 83, Kingston, 

Pa. 



8o 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Lain, Lizzie. 89, Lehman, Pa., teacher. 
Lain, Rachel B., M. D„ 84, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
Lamb, Charles L , 70, Minneapolis, Minn.. 

lawyer. 
Lamkin, Minnie, 07. Beech Creek, Pa.. 

teacher. 
Lancaster, G. Antoinette, !)7, Forksville.Pa.. 

teacher. 
Landon. Bion W., 82, Elmira. N. Y., R. R., 

employee 
Lane. Mrs. W. F. (nee Emma Adams), 79, 

Ridgway, Pa. 
Lane, Mrs. Jesse L. (nee Anna Louise Shaw). 

91, Montrose, Pa. 
Langan, George, 71. 
Langdon, Winnie A.. 90, Mansfield, Pa., 

teacher. 
*Lannon, Robert M., 78. 
Lathrop. Wilbur F., 70, Carbondale, Pa , 

lawyer. 
Lawrence, Josephine (Mrs T. A. Fessler), 

89, M 92. Elkland. Pa. 
Lawrence, Margaret Effle.94, Mansfield, Pa. , 

teacher. 
Leach. Harvey V..83,Blossburg,Pa .lawyer. 
Leach. Helen E.. 96. Chinchilla, Pa., teacher 
Learned, Cora Alice, 96, Pine City. N. Y., 

teacher. 
Leahy. James R..91, Wilawana.Pa., teacher. 
Lee, Anna Frances, 91, Ashley, Pa., teacher 
Lee, Hattie W., 92, Honesdale, Pa., teacher 
Lee. Jennie S.. 84, Honesdale. Pa , teacher. 
Lee, Maine, 86., No. 125 Pine St,, Harrisburg, 

Pa., teacher. 
Lee. Mary E., 92. Ashley. Pa., teacher. 
Lee, Mrs. Wm. (nee Florence S. Gray), 73, 

Russell, Kan. 
Leet, Mary Alice. 91, Dunaaff. Pa., teacher. 
Leet, Frank Arthur. 93. Ulysses.Pa., teacher. 
Lent. Alberts.. 80, Wellsboro. Pa., farmer. 
"Lent. Cora Ethel (Mrs. George Higley), 93 
•Lent, Mrs. G. W. (nee Lura E. Johnson), 88. 
Leonard, Anna Julia, M., 90, Granville Cen- 
tre. Pa. 
Leonard. Austin. 08. Troy. Pa . farmer. 
Leonard, Frank M., 80, Wellsville, N. Y.. 

manufacturer. 
Leonard, Mrs. Frank M, (nee Carrie M. 

Close), 86, Wellsville, N. Y. 
Leonard. Fred. C. 74, Pittsburg, Pa., (Grad. 

Yale), lawyer. 
Leonard, Mrs. Fred C. (nee Estella G. Cook), 

74. Pittsburg, Pa. 
Leonard, George Austin, 94, Troy, Pa., 

teacher. 
Leonard, James N., 79, Eldridge, Pa., 

teacher. 
Leonard. Mary G.,90.,Scranton,Pa..teacher 
Leonard. Solomon S., 90, Pine City, N. Y. , 

farmer. 
*Levan, Abbie G (Mrs William S.Porter), 85. 
Levisee, Mrs A. W. (nee Dora L Stevens), 

77. Lemon, Pa. 
Lewis. A. Llewellyn, 74, New York, N. Y., 
printer. 



Lewis. Nellie A., 85. No. 57 School St.. Brad- 
ford, Pa., teacher. 

Lewis, Lena Rivers, 96, Mansfield, Pa., 
teacher. 

Lewis. Mary L , 96. West Covington, Pa., 
teacher. 

Lewis, Sarah I. (Mrs. Richard Krusen), 71, 
Westfield. Pa. 

Lewis, Winrteld O., 71, West Covington. Pa„ 
farmer. 

Lincoln. Mary E., M. D. (Mrs. Dr. E. W. 
Gould), 0. Thomaston. Maine. 

Lindsley. Frank Irwin.93,Lawrenceville.Pa. 

Little. Jessie P., 75, S 77, Laporte Pa., 
lawyer. 

Lloyd, Morgan J., 87, 01yphant,Pa.,teacher. 

Lobingier. Mrs. Dr. Stewart (nee Kate Rey- 
nolds. M D.). 70. Denver. Colo. 

Lockhart. Mrs. C. E. (nee Carrie E.Wiggins), 

86. Ridgwav. Pa. 
Logan. Lizzie W.. 85. 

Long, Minerva J„ 96, Renovo, Pa., teacher. 

Longbothum, Ray Clare, 91, S 94, Mansfield. 
Pa., teacher. 

Longstreet, William R., 83, Mansfield, Pa., 

tGJJCllPr s N S 

Longstreet. Mrs Wm'.R.diee Lucy Ransom), 
82, Mansfield, Pa. 

*Loomis Helen H. (Mrs. R. W. Smalley), 71. 

Losey, Mary Emily. 94. Nelson, Pa. .teacher. 

Lott, Mrs. Ernest (nee Martha J. Carlln), 90, 
Auburn Four Corners, Pa. 

Loveless, Edith June. 95, Tioga, Pa. .teacher. 

Lowe, Vira (Mrs. M. P. Burch), 87, Aspin, 
Colo. 

Lownsberry, Ida L. (Mrs. Rev. F. P. Sim- 
mons). 88, Fillmore. N. Y. 

Lownsberry, Edith A., 91, Canoe Camp, Pa„ 
teacher. 

Lubrecht. William, 89, No. 616 S. Main St , 
Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. 

Ludlam, Mrs. Samuel (nee Florence E.Bush), 
90. Academy Corners, Pa. 

Lugg, Mrs. A Waldo (nee Emma L. Star- 
key), 86, Knoxville. Pa. 

Lugg, Charles H., 84, Knoxville. Pa , mer- 
chant. 

Lung, Elnora (Mrs, E. L Bevens), 66, Deca- 
tur, 111. 

Lung, Henry. 85, Seattle. Wash., lawyer. 

Lung, Mary Grace, 84, Wvalusing, Pa. 

Lusch. Mrs Hannah S.(nee Hannah Sherer), 
M 73. No. 567 Carlton Ave., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Lyon, Frank R., 89, Arnot, Pa., civil and 
mining engineer 

Lyon George Martin, 92, Spring Mills, Pa., 
teacher. 

Lyon, Louise (Mrs. J. H. Johnson), 74, No. 
614 Nicollect Ave., Minneapolis. Minn. 

Lyon. Lucetta (Mrs. George W. Bolles), 09, 
West Auburn. Pa. 

Lyon, Mary, 94, Fall Brook, Pa., teacher. 

•Lyman. Samuel H. 79. 

Mackey, Manley, 88, Lathrop, Pa., farmer. 

Maclay, Edwin, 84, Waverly, Pa., teacher. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



8l 



Mahon, Alfred Neale. 90, No. 81 N. Main St., 
Pittston, Pa. 

Main, Joseph 0.,86. Mehoopany, Pa. .teacher. 

Maine. Charles L., M. D., 83, Helvetia, Clear- 
field Co., Pa. 

Maine, Howard P., 80, Mainesburg, Pa. 

Maitland. Theodore H., 88, Liberty, Pa., 
teacher. 

Major, Alice Gertrude, 01, Lehman, Pa. 

Malia, Lizzie v., 91, Instructor in Interna- 
tional Correspondence Schools, Scran- 
ton, Pa. 

Mauley, Rush Emmett, 88, Presho, N. Y. 

Mann, Arthur L., 06, Mansfield. Pa. .teacher. 

Marcy, Milton S., M. D., 75, Aimesville, 111. 

Marsh, Jessie M„ 89, Lamb's Creek, Pa., 
teacher and farmer. 

Marvin, John C.,97, Covington. Pa., teacher. 

*Marvin, Harry B., 91. 

Marvin, Iaabelle, 96, Covington, Pa. .teacher. 

Marvin. William Cameron, 88, Denver.Colo., 
agent. 

Marvin, Mrs. Wm. C. (nee Ina Reese), 89, 
Denver, Colo. 

Mather, John W., 71, Wellsboro, Pa. .lawyer. 

Matthews, John I., 80, Eimira, N. Y., sales- 
man. 

Mattison, Fannie L. (Mrs. Woodford), 83, 
Tunesassa, N. Y. 

Maxey, Benjamin Franklin, 93, Forest City, 
Pa., student N. Y. College of Phar- 
macy. 

Maxey, George D., 96, Forest City, Pa., 
teacher. 

Maxey, William Solomon, 90. Montrose, Pa., 
lawyer. 

McAuliff, M. C, 95. Marden, Pa., teacher. 

McCarthy, Frank Augustus, 93. Miner's 
Mills, Pa., teacher. 

McCarthy, Margunte A., 90, No. 150 Second 
St., Eimira, X. V. 

McCawley, John E., 84, Dickinson City, Pa., 
teacher. 

McCollom, Lisle, 05, Troy, Pa., student Cor- 
nell. 

McCollom, Louise, 95, Troy, Pa., student 
Cornell. 

McCord, Mary, St C E 69. Lewisburg, Pa. 
teacher. 

McConnell, Stella, 98, Rutland, Pa., teacher. 

McCormack, John, 89, Ashley, Pa., teacher. 

McCormack, Katherine Alberta. 90, Ashley, 

McCormack, Frank T.. 91. No. 16 S. Franklin 

St.. Wilkes Barre, Pa., lawyer. 
McCulloch, Samuel Johnson, 75, Kansas 

City, Mo., lawyer. 
McDade, Maggie J., 81. Wilkes Barre, Pa., 

teacher. 
McDowell. Mrs. Charles (nee Rena Watts). 

91. Mansfield. Pa. 
McFarland.Mrs. W. A. (nee Laura Z.Hall). 75, 

Watson town, Pa 
McCann, Agnes G., 87', Wilkes Barre, Pa., 

teacher. 
McCann, Ella, 87. Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. 



McGrath, John. M. D., 91. resident physician 
Lackawanna hospital, Scranton, Pa. 

McGraw, Ella, 88, Alton, Pa., teacher. 

McGregor, Mrs. Rev. D. (nee Ada F. Cole), 
71. t tevensville, Mont. 

McGovern, Ella F., 97,Herrick. Pa., teacher. 

McGuigan, Julia, 90, No. 2325 Birney Ave., 
Scranton. Pa., teacher. 

McGnire, Frank H., 94, Cicero.N.Y.. teacher. 

McGuire, George Thomas. 93, Wilkes Barre, 
Pa 

McHale, Thomas F., 96, Olypliant, Pa.. 
teacher. 

Mclnroy, Mrs. Samuel F. (nee Rose S. Rock- 
well), 87, Middlebury. Pa. 

*McKay, James E., 68. 

McKean, Charles B., 73, Boston Building, 
Denver, Colo., with Colorado Coal and 
Iron Co. 

*McKean, Mrs. Chas. B. (nee Urania E. Day- 
ton), M. 73. 

McKean, Mrs. Chas.B. (nee Addie M.Elliott), 
7'5, No. 724 Nineteenth Ave., Denver, 
Colo. 

McKee. James Milford, 78, Silver Creek. N. 
Y., principal of schools. 

McKinney, Edgar E.. 81, Breesport, N. Y. 

♦McKinney, Mrs. Edgar E. (nee Mary S. 
Baldwin), 87 

McKinney, Eva (Mrs. Joseph Kilmer), 93, 
Eimira, N. Y. 

McKinney, Louis H., 96, Somers Lane, Pa., 
teacher. 

McKinney, Mrs. Walter S. (nee Martha A. 
Baldwin), 78,No.575 Washington Boul., 
Chicago, 111. 

McLaughlin, Alice Clare. 93, No. 160 E. Mar- 
ket St., Wilkes Barre. Pa., teacher. 

McManama, Elizabeth C, 90. No. 311 Pitts- 
ton Ave., Scranton, Pa., teacher. 

McWhorter, Minnie B., 86, Webb's Mills, N. 

Medley, Ida S. (Mrs. William H. Burdickj,89, 
Franklin, Mass, 

Meehan, Rose Anastasia, 94, Scranton, Pa., 

Metne, Philip, 86, Germanla, Pa., teacher. 

iMellville. Mrs. Harry T. (nee Jessie O.Camp- 
bell), 89, Luther's Mills, Pa. 

♦Merrick Alma M. (Mrs W. L. Bliss), 70. 

Merrick. Clinton v., 70, Bradford, Pa.. Supt. 
N. Y.. L. E. & W. Ry. 

Merrick, George E., 96, Galeton, Pa. .teacher. 

Merritt, Henry W., 95, Plains. Pa., teacher. 

Metcalf, Floral V., 98. Austin, Pa. 

Metcalf. Mrs. H. E. (nee Laura E. Johnson), 
78, Mansfield, Pa. 

Meylert. Frank w.. 86, Laport, Pa., Supt. of 
Schools, Sullivan Co.. Pa. 

Michels, Mrs. J. S. (nee Nora I. Bond), 91, 
Meshoppen, Pa. 

Middaugh. Edith, 97, Somers Lane, Pa., 

Middaugh, Ella (Mrs. E. A. Beale), M. 73, No. 

618 Hough Ave.. Cleveland. Ohio. 
Miles, Sarah J., 91, Kingston, Pa., teacher. 
Miliken, Beatrice, 90, Gelatt, Pa., teacher. 



82 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL — FIFTH DISTRICT 



Miller, Albert Osser, Jr., A. B„ LL.B.,LL.M., 

85, No. 70 Grove St., Passaic, N. J, 

lawyer. 
Miller, Clarence B., T8. Nanticoke, Pa. .State 

Representative. 
Miller, Eliza M. (Mrs. Fred S. Fitzgerald),?!), 

Waverly, N. Y. 
Miller, Harriet A. W., 97. Snedekerville, Pa., 

teacher. 
Miller. Emma E., 9a, Mainesburg, Pa. 
Miller. Mrs. Edward R. (nee RachelJones), 90. 

Gloversville, N. Y. 
Miller, John L., 85, Corning, N. Y., teacher. 
Miller, Lillian Rebecca, 93, Lovelton, Pa., 

teacher. 
Miller. William B., 80, Moscow, Pa., teacher. 
Miller, Willis S., 88, (Grad. Lafayette), Tunk- 

hannock. Pa., lawyer. 
Millmore, Mrs. Wm. (nee Ida M. Rogers), 83, 

Sitka, Alaska. 
Mills, John, 70, Camden Place, Minneapolis, 

Minn., civil engineer. 
Mills. Mrs. Jno. (nee Rose Voorhess). M 73. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Mills. Mrs. Dr. J. M. (nee Lizzie Z. Beverson), 

82, Antrim, Pa. 
Mills, L. Agnes, 88, Ariel, Pa., teacher. 
Mills, Rachel Addie, 94, Round Top, Pa- 
teacher. 
*Ming, Jacob K.. 73. 
Mitchell, Franc C.(Mrs.William C.Edwards). 

7.. Larned. Kansas. 
Mitchell, Mrs. H. A. (nee Kate Neal), 84, 

Blossburg. Pa. 

Mitchell. Mary (.Mrs. }. 89, Wells, Pa. 

Mitchell. Ray. in), Millerton, Pa., teacher. 
Mold, Fred, 87, Blossburg, Pa. .civil engineer. 
Mollahan, Anna A., 90, No. 345 Park Ave., 

Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
Morgan, Kate A., 92. Dunmore, Pa., teacher. 
Monks. Kate Edna, 95 Chatham Valley, Pa- 
teacher. 
♦Montgomery, Mrs. E.M. (nee Fanny Green). 71 
Montgomery. Charles Richard, 93, West 

Franklin, Pa., teacher. 
Moody, Dora H.. 97, C P97, Mansfield, Pa. 
Moody. Lizzie B. (Mrs. S. M. Huston), 80, 

Frauklindale, Pa. 
Moody, Nono (Mrs. Eugene T. Barnes), 87, 

Mansfield, 1'a 
Moon, Charles .1.. 89, Butternut Grove, N.Y., 

Supt. Colchester Chemical Co. 
Moore. Mrs. Frederick (nee Emma B. Hunt), 

M 71, Binghamton, N. Y. 
Moore, Jennie, M 95, New Milford, Pa,, 

teacher. 
Moore, Ed. v.. 84. Castle, Mont., ranchman. 
Moran. Mrs. John L.mee Mary R. Richards). 

85, Rock Island. 111. 
Morgan. Edward W., 92, New Milford, Pa., 

teacher. 
Morgan, Elizabeth Roberts. 90. Kingston, Pa. 
Morley, Fannie, no. No. 1780 N. Fifth St., 

Harrisburg, Pa., teacher. 
Morley, Grace E., 91, Green's Landing, Pa., 

teacher, 



Morris. Mrs. Wilbur H. (nee Carrie A. Coop- 
er), 89, Tunkhannock, Pa. 

Morris, Katharine (Mrs. K. M. Swan), Mans- 
field, Pa. 

Morrison. Sarah (Mrs. B. F. Werline), 71, 
Liberty, Pa. 

Morse, Frances E., 97. Oswayo. Pa. .teacher. 

Morse, John H., 96, Lakeside, Pa., teacher. 

Morse, Kate, 93, ' thens. Pa., teacher, 

! Morse, Lucy M.,' 77, Montrose, Pa., teacher. 

Morse, William D, 91, Troy, Pa. Jaw student. 

Morse. R. Lena (Mrs. Rev. T. D. Butler), 71, 
S 79, Abington, Knox Co., 111. 

*Mowrey, Alfred, 83. 

Mulhern, Mary J., 87. No. 138 S. Grant St., 
Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. 

Mullen. John J., 90. Mlnooka, Pa., teacher. 

Munn. Alice R. (Mrs. Ralph E. Burdick), 89, 
Smethport, Pa. 

Munro, Bell. 94, Morris Run. Pa., teacher. 

Murdough. George P.,80,No. 5501 Lake Ave., 
Chicago. 111. 

Muir. James, 95, Fall Brook, Pa., teacher. 

Murphy, John Lester. 93, Mansfield, Pa. 

♦Murphy, Katharine Elizabeth, 93. 

Murphy, Margaret, 90, Morris Run, Pa- 
teacher. 

Murray, M. A.. 88. Hazle Ave., Wilkes Barre, 
Pa., teacher. 

Murray, Petronella, 90, Arnot, Pa., teacher. 

Myer, Nellie Rita,92,Towanda, Pa., teacher. 

Mver. Thos. E., 08, Towanda, Pa., life in- 
surance. 

Nailen, May, 91, Canton, Pa., teacher. 

Nares, Mrs. Geo. (nee Mma Hall), 82, Corn- 
ing, N. Y. 

Nash, Margaret G.. 97, Antrim, Pa., teacher. 

Navel. Mrs. Dennis (nee Ruth Buckley), 94, 
Wellsboro, Pa. 

Neal, Kate (Mrs. H. A. Mitchell), 84, Bloss- 
burg, Pa. 

Neefe, Addie C. (Mrs. Ernest L. Wells), 87, 
Oswayo, pa. 

Neefe, Katherine, 90, Sweden, Pa., teacher. 

Nelson, Alexander, 82, No. 117 Chestnut St., 
Philadelphia, Pa., book keeper. 

*>elson, John F., Jr., 98. 

Nesbitt, Mrs. (nee E. Jennie Lain), 83,Kings- 
ton. Pa. 

Newell, Eleanor E.. 90, South Hill, Pa- 
teacher. 

Neweli, Mrs. Rev. Chas. K. (nee Hattie B. 
Pitts), 83, Addison. N. Y'. 

Newell. Frank M„ 80, Elmira, N. Y- dentist. 

Newton, E. Louise, 97, Brooklyn. Pa. .teacher 

Nicol,AnnieForbes,97',FallBrook, Pa. .teacher 

Nicholson, Mrs. Rev. J. (nee Blanche Crowl), 
88, Binghamton, N. Y. 

*Nields, Anna, 08. 

Oakley. Martha L- 92, No. 312 Baty St., El- 
mira, N. Y- teacher. 

Oakley, Pearl M., 96. Elmira, N. Y.. teacher. 

O'Boyle, Ella J- 90, No. na Railroad Ave.. 
Scranton, Pa., teacher. 

O'Boyle, Kate, 93, No. 218 Railroad Ave., 
Bcranton, Pa. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



83 



O'Connell, Anna Gertrude, 93, Harrisburg. 

O'Connell, Catherine M., 90, No. 1351 Vernon 

St., Harrisburg. Pa., teacher. . 
O'Connor, Lura, 93, Morris, Pa. 
O'Dell, Mrs. T. E. (nee Agnes M. Baynes), 89, 

Mansfield, Pa. 
O'Hara, John J., 90, Olyphant. Pa., teacher 
Olmstead, Clement J., 78, Wellsville, N. Y. 
O'Neill, Anna C, 85. M 85, No. 212 N. Main 

St., Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
O'Neill, Daniel L., 89, No. 212 N. Main St., 

Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. 
Orr, William, 90, Stony Fork, Pa., teacher. 
Osborne,Chas.F ,80.FurestLake,Pa. .teacher. 
*Osthaus, Arthur C, 75. 
Osgood, Ruth, 95, Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 
Overfleld, Edward F., 80,Silver Plume.Colo., 

engineer. 
Overfleld. Minnie. 93, Meshoppen. Pa., teacher 
Overfleld, Peter D., C P 90. Skinners Eddy, 

Pa., student University of Penn 
Owen, May, 92, Jobs Corners, Pa., teacher. 
Owen, Minnie Maud, 93, Jobs Corners. Pa., 

teacher. 
Owen, William F., 84, Phillips, Wis., lawyer. 
Packard, A. J., 90, Davis, West Va. .teacher. 
Paine, David. C P 97, Troy, Pa., teacher. 
Painter, Frances M.,8y,Elniira,N.Y.,teacher. 
Palmer. Eunice L.iMrs. C. S. Vail), 79, New 

Milford, Pa. 
Palmer, Helen M . 70, Mansfield, Pa. 
"Palmer, Jessie F. (Mrs. Lloyd G.Bullard),89. 
Palmer, Lily, 98. Priceburg, Pa., teacher. 
Palmer, Lulu A., 97. Mansfield. Pa., teacher. 
Palmer, Ulysses Grant, 80, Oakland, Md.. 

Supt. Schools, Garrett county. 
Parfltt. Isaac C, Blossburg. Pa., miner. 
Park. Mrs. A. D. (nee Annie M.Demorest),75, 

Waverly. N. Y. 
Parke, Leonard A., 79, Russell. Kan., teacher. 
Parks, Caroline M., 95, Tioga, Pa., teacher. 
Parker, Augusta, 96, Canton, Pa., teacher 
"Parker, F. Blanche, 97. 
Parks, Emma E. (Mrs. Ed. Burton), 7G,Mans- 

field, Pa. 
"Parsons, Edna, 79. 

Patchen, Frank H., 96. Covington, Pa., clerk. 
Patchen, W. Howard, 97, Covington. Pa., 

teacher. 
Patterson, Andrew H., 95. Glen Richey, Pa., 

teacher. 
Patterson, Rhoda, 95, Arnot. Pa., teacher. 
Patterson, Emily M. (Mrs. Adolph N. Wil- 
liams), 75, Stockholm, Sweden. 
Patten. Melcora (Mrs. J. P. Purdy),83,Oakes- 

dale, Wash. 
Paul, Anna L , 67,Philadelphia, Pa. .teacher. 
Payne, Alice R., 97, Jackson Summit, Pa., 

teacher. 
Payne, Katherine SI.. 91. Morris.Pa. .teacher. 
Pearson, Ella M., 95, Fall Brook, Pa. .teacher. 
Pearson, Mrs. Samuel (nee Evaline Hickox), 

82, Wellsboro, Pa. 
Peck, Anna G. (Mrs. VV. H. Capell), 83,Mans- 

fleld, Pa. 



Peck, Mrs. C. L. (nee Ida M. Stoddard), 71, 

Coudersport, Pa. 
Peck, Eva (Mrs. Wm. Spoor), 72, Osceola, Pa. 
Peck, Nellie L., 90, Elmhurst. Pa., teacher. 
Peck, Welland A.. 92. Elmhurst, Pa., medi- 
cal student University of Penn. 
Peck, William H., si. Nelson, Pa. 
Perkins. Ruth M., 89, Hazleton, Pa., teacher. 
Perry, Mrs. A. M. (nee Carrie A. Pratt), 77, 

Mansfield, Pa. 
Peterson, Mrs. W. S. (nee Helen O. Brandt), 

71, Rapid City, Black Co.. Dak. 
Peterson. Harry S.,98, Mansfield. Pa. .teacher. 
Phillips, CoraH. (Mrs. Chas. H. Ashton), 91, 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Phillips, Helen (Mrs. E. A. Cruttenden), 90, 

Scranton, Pa. 
Phillips, Bert L.. (15, Gaines, Pa., teacher. 
Phoenix. Lydia Ellen, 79, A. M., O. M.. M. A., 

Oswego, N.Y., teacher Oswego Normal 

School. 
Pierce, Ida Mae, 95, East Smithfield, Pa., 

teacher. 
Pitts, David L., 75, Campbells, N. Y., clergy- 
man. 
Pitts, Hattie B. (Mrs. Rev. Chas. K. Newell), 

83, Addison. N. Y. 
Pitts, Mary Ellen, 93. Wellsboro. Pa., clerk. 
Pitts. Mary (Mrs. Smith), Osawatomie, Kan. 
Pitts. Wayne Apollos, 91, Mansfield, Pa., 

merchant. 
Piatt. Mrs. (nee Elizabeth S. Atwood), 88, 

Herricksville, Pa. 
Pneuman, Susie A., 89, Meshoppen, Pa.. 

teacher. 
Pollock, Mrs. Alexander (nee Mary E. Greg- 
ory), 87. Antrim, Pa. 
Pollock, Aydie E., 95. Antrim, Pa., teacher. 
"Porter, Mrs. Wm. (nee Abbie G. LeVan),85. 
Potter, Electa L., 90, North Jackson, Pa., 

teacher. 
Potter. Faye R., M 91, Hammond, Ind., mu- 
sic teacher. 
Potter Frances Josephene, 93, Keeneyville, 

Pa. 
Potter. Myrte McAudrey, 96, 429 West Second 

St , Elmira, N. Y., teacher. 
Potter.Velma M.. 90. Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 
Powers, Josephine V., 90, Pittston, Pa., 

teacher. 
Powers. Mrs. W. W., (neeEmareneConard), 

67, Kennett's Square, Pa. 
Pratt. Carrie A. (Mrs. A. M. Perry), 77, 

Mansfield, Pa. 
Pratt. Frank L., 93, Mansfield, Pa., medical 

student University of Penn. 
Pratt. Fred. H., 88, East Charleston, Pa., 

farmer. 
Pratt. Mrs. Fred. H. (nee Stella Snover), 89, 

East Charleston, Pa. 
Pratt, Vine R., 08, Reynoldsville, Pa., civil 

engineer. 
Pratt, Mrs. V. R. (nee Alice E. Darling), 68, 

Reynoldsville. Pa. 
Presho, Bertha Mabel, 93, Raymond, Pa., 

teacher. 



§4 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



Presho, Chester Edward, 90, Raymond, Pa., 
teacher. 

Preston,ElizabethH.92.EastTroy,I'a.teacher 

Preston, Emma J., 79, Meshoppen, Pa. 

Preston, Mrs. M. C. (nee Naomi S. Wilcox), 
75, Canton. Pa. 

Preston, Susan R. (Mrs. E.G. Seamands), 07, 
Wyoming. Delaware. 

*Prevost. Vernet Edward, 79. 

Prosser, Cleora E., M. D., 80, Wheaton, 111. 

Prutsman, Jennie E., 95, Lawrenceville, Pa. 

Prutsman, Angeline Horton, 94, Lawrence- 
ville, Pa., teacher. 

Purcell, Kate A., 85,Spokane,Wash.. teacher. 

Purdy, Mrs. J. B. (nee Melcora Patton), 83, 
Oakesdale, Wash. 

Quackenbush, Emma, 97,Tioga, Pa.,teacher. 

Quinlan, Katharine, 88,Harford, Pa. .teacher. 

Quinlan. Melissa Cameron, 95, Choconut, 

Quinn, John J., 91, No. 371 Hazle St., Wilkes 
Barre, Pa., teacher. 

Ransom, Ruth B., 96. Harford. Pa., teacher. 

Ratter. Laura Etta, 91, instructor in Inter- 
national Correspondece Schools, Scran- 
ton, Pa. 

Raker, Lenora G., 84. No. 2319 Douglas St., 
Omaha, Neb., stenographer. 

Rallston,EUaP.,li7,Honeybrook,Pa.,teacher. 

♦Ralston. Mary A. G., 67. 

Ramsdell, Florian Lee, 90, Mansfield, Pa., 
laundryman. 

Ramsdell. Ida Luella. M. 91, Corning, N. Y. 

Ransom. Lucy i Mrs. W. R. Longstreet), 82, 
Mansfield, Pa. 

Raymond, Robb Roe, 93, Genesee, Pa., mer- 
chant. 

Read, J. Anabel. 83, No. 935 Logan Ave., San 
Diego, Cal., teacher. 

Reading. James ri., 78. Ridgway, Pa , lum- 
berman. 

Reading, Mrs. James H. (nee Phida E. 
Beards!ey),78, Ridgway, Pa. 

Reese, Addie L.(Mrs. O. E. Crediford),79, An- 
trim, Pa. 

Reese, Amos Philip, 93, Round Top, Pa., stu- 
dent Lafayette college. 

Reese, Frederick W., 95, Alden, Pa.. teacher. 

Reese, Ina (Mrs. William C. Marvin), 89, 
Denver, Colo. 

Reese, Mrs. J. E. (nee Anna R. Farrer), 79, 
Mansfield, Pa. 

•Reese, M. Louise, 86. 

Regan, Ella T., 88, No. 54 Jackson St.,Wilkes 
Barre, Pa., teacher. 

Retan. Olney A., A. M., 75, Wellsburg, N.Y., 
clergyman. 

Rew, Eleanor. 84, Weeping Water, Cass Co., 
Neb., teacher. 

Rexford,CoraE.(Mrs.Snyder),81.Letonia.Pa. 

Reynolds. Mrs. E. G. (nee Carrie M.Stevens). 
86, Fleetville, Pa. 

Rexford, Mrs. J. C. (nee Ada A. Baynes), 85. 
Mansfield, Pa. 

Reynolds, Harry A., 88, S 91, 147th Street, 
Harvey, III. 



Reynolds, Joshua N, 87. Emmltt. Idaho, 

Reynolds, Kate, M. D. (Mrs. Dr. Stewart Lo- 
bingter), 70, Denver, Colo. 

Reynolds. Mary E., 93, South Gibson, Pa. 

Reynolds, Myra, 70, teacher University of 
Chicago. 

Reynolds, Walter Guernsey, M 91, St. Paul, 
Minn., clerk. 

Reynolds. Mrs. William (nee Mary D. Good- 
rich), 76. Elmira, N. Y. 

Ribble. Ella, 82, No. 585 Superior St., Toledo, 
Ohio. 

Ribble, Emma (Mrs. William Barnes), 76,No. 
585 Superior St , Toledo, Ohio. 

Rice, Jennie Louise, 92, Lamb's Creek, Pa., 

too f*}"IPV 

Richards, Alfred J., 88, Cherry Flats, Pa., 

merchant. 
Richards, Eva M , 95,Blossburg,Pa.,teacher. 
Richards, J. W.. 87, Bald Mount.Pa ,teacher. 
Richards. Mary R. (Mrs. John L. Moran), 85, 

Rock Island, 111. 
Richmond, Colin Roy, 94, Elk Run, Pa., 

Richmond, Mrs. Oscar (nee Emily E. Howe), 

78, Mansfield, Pa. 
Riebsam, Addie M., 81, Wellsboro, Pa., 

Rifenburg, Mrs.F. M.(nee Emma C.Vought), 

75. Rome, Pa. 
Riley. Mrs. Stewart (nee Eva L. Ely), 86, 

Springfield, Pa. 
Ripley, Adaline May (Mrs. Delbert C.Smith), 

92, Mainesburg, Pa. 
Ripley, Sara Eleanor, 93, Lamb's Creek, Pa., 

Rissell. Nellie A. .89.Williamsport.Pa., teacher. 

Ritter, Charles T., 91, Nauvoo, Pa., teacher. 

Ritter, Ella N.. 85, Liberty, Pa. 

Ritter, Margaret A., 86,Nauvoo,Pa., teacher. 

Roberts, Ellen, 91, Plymouth. Pa., teacher. 

Robbins. Ida, 95, Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 

Robbins, Olive, 95, Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 

Robinson, Ella V. (Mrs. A. G. EstaBrook),89, 
Mt. Alton. Pa. 

Robinson, Ina, 89, Strasburg. Pa., teacher. 

Robinson, Jennie C, 85, Nicholson, Pa., 
+po piTpr 

Robinson. Mrs. John (nee Sadie V. Bailey), 
92, Wellsboro, Pa 

Roblyer, Herbert, 77. Wellsboro. Pa., farmer. 

Rockwell, Mrs. Chas. S. (nee Lucy M. Hol- 
lands), 78, Blossburg, Pa. 

Rockwell, Frances L. (Mrs. Coly J. Beach), 
88, Mansfield. Pa. 

Rockwell. Mrs. Frank H. (nee Lucy B. 
Bailey), 88, Wellsboro, Pa. 

Rockwell. Nellie M. (Mrs. Chester Blanch- 
ard), 77, Farmington Hill. Pa. 

Rockwell, Rose S. (Mrs. Samuel F. Mclnroy), 
87, Middlebury, Pa. 

Rockwell, Teressa Holmes (Mrs. Dr. Her- 
bert Haskins), 92, Williamsport, Pa. 

Roderick, Mrs. D. D. (nee Mary A. Griffith), 
63, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



85 



V ' 



i. 



Roe, John C, 80. Keeneyville. Pa. 

Rogers, Ida M. (Mrs. Win. Millmore), 83, 

Sitka. Alaska, missionary. 
Rogers, William Louis, 91, Harford, Pa., 

teacher. 
Rolloson, Mrs. MettaD..93,Alba. Pa. .teacher. 
Rose, Emerson J., 67, No. 1115 C. St., N. E . 

Washington, D. C. 
Rose, Edith (Mrs. Nelson Smith), 95, Maines- 

burg, Pa. 
Rose, Jay W., 90, No. 776 Elmwocd Ave.. 

Buffalo, N. Y.j clerk. 
Rose, Julia A.. 91, Mainesburg. Pa., teacher. 
Rosengrant, Emery Judson, 85, Mansfield, 

Pa., clergyman. 
Rosenkrans, Daniel H., 86. Fairdale, Pa., 

teacher. 
Rosenkrans. E. C, 88, Fairdale, Pa. 
Ross. Charles S., 76. Mansfield. Pa., banker. 
Ross. Mrs. Edward H. (nee Mary E. Waldo), 

92, Mansfield, Pa. 
Rounds, Herman H . 91, Uniondale, Pa. 

teacher in Pleasant Mt. Academy. 
Rounds, Wellington, 91, Uniondale, Pa. 
Rowe, Ella E. (Mrs. A. S. Carver), 75, Breck- 
inridge, Texas. 
Rumsey, Albert J.. 77, Mansfield, Pa , farmer 

and teacher. 
Rumsey, Grace, M 94, Mainesburg. Pa. 
Rundail, Ed A., 80, Tioga, Pa., clerk. 
Russell, Flora May, 90, Mansfield. Pa., teacher 

S. N. S. 
Ryan, Stella M., 88, Wellsboro, Pa., teacher. 
Ryan, David H., 78, Lawrenceville, Pa., 

farmer. 
Ryon, Wm. W.,7-1. Shamokin, Pa., lawyer. 
Sabin, Charles, 77, Elkland, Pa., teacher. 
Sackrider, Daniel A., 74, Randolph, N. Y., 

lawyer. 
Sampson, Anna Eliza,91, Crooked Creek,Pa., 

teacher. 
Samuel, John, 93, No. 63 Sheridan St., Wilkes 

Barre, Pa., teacher. 
Samuel, Mrs. John (nee Mildred Smith), 93, 

Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
Sandbach, Emily M. (Mrs. Dr. Frederick L 

Dolbeare), 89, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sands, Mrs. Frank E.mee Edna M.Eurman), 

86. Scottdale, Pa. 
Sanford, Walton A , 86, Waverly, Pa., 

f po pll pf' 

Satterlee, Mrs. D. L. (nee Franc Kemp), 811. 

Jackson, Tioga Co., Pa. 
Satterlee, Esther Ennis, 73, Elmira, N. Y., 

teacher. 
Saylor. Mrs. J. F. (nee Lottie A. Dean). 78, 

Lincoln, Neb. 
Sehmitt, Mrs. Carl (nee Mary Emma Cod- 

dington), 90, N. Main St., Wilkes Barre, 

Pa. 
Schusler, Mrs. Joseph (nee Amy A. Davis). 

67, Mansfield, Pa. 
*Scott, Lillian (Mrs. George Trim), 71. 
Scouten, Hattie B., 88,Sylvania,Pa. teacher. 
Scouten, Jennie, 91, Sylvania, Pa., teacher. 
Scouten. John G., 76, Dushore, Pa., lawyer. 



ISeamands, Mrs. E. G. (nee SusanR. Preston), 

67, Wyoming, Del. 
Searles, Jennie B.. 88. Seeleyville, Pa., 

teacher at Los Angeles, Cal. 
Seely. Lena Edna, 94. Nelson, Pa., teacher. 
Selb'y, George W.. 78, Utica, N.Y., architect. 
Selph, Frank D., 83, Nelson, Pa., lawyer. 
Shappee, William A.. M. D., 71, No. 107 W. 

Main St., Xenia, Ohio. 
Shappee, Mrs. Dr. William A. (nee Hattie D. 

Close), 72. Xenia, Ohio. 
Sharp, Arthur B., 92, (Grad. Lafayette), 

Jenningsville, Pa. 
Shattuck, Alfred J., 77. Wellsboro, Pa., 

lawyer. 
Shaughnessy. Agnes, 88, Wilkes Barre, Pa., 

#-po ft [lp f 

Shaw. Anna Louise, (Mrs. Jessie S. Lane),91, 

Montrose. Pa. 
Shaw, Benjamin Franklin,92,Lamb's Creek, 

Shaw, be'los Whitman, 93, Farmington Hill, 

Shaw, Edith L. (Mrs. T. P. Jones), 88, Mont- 
rose, Pa., teacher. 
Shaw, Edward Porter, 93,Lainb'sCreek,Pa.. 

*Shaw, Eliza J. (Mrs. Julius M. Bates), 71. 
Shaw, Ella L.. 72, Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 
Shaw, F. Mabel. 96, Montrose, Pa., teacher. 
Shaw, James A., 90, Blossburg, Pa. .teacher. 
Shaw, John H., 89, S. 97, Mansfield, Pa., 

farmer. 
Shaw,Llewellyn,91,Mansfield,Pa., merchant. 
Shaw, Mary E. (Mrs. Cassell Esnlemau), 88, 

Lancaster, Pa. 
*Shaw, Nellie Leone, 94. 
Shay, Oscar D., M. D.. 83, Montrose, Pa. 
Shea, Mary G„ 90, No. 311 Pittston Ave., 

Scranton, Pa., teacher. 
Sheets, Ida Mae, 97, Fairdale, Pa., teacher. 
Sheffer, Maud E. (Mrs. Harry J. Wilcox), 89, 

Wellsboro. Pa. 
Sheive, Will G., 79, Richland, N. J., teacher. 
Shelve, Mrs. Will G. (nee Mettie Voorhees), 

83. Richland, N. J. 
Shelly, Richard. 93, Ransom, Pa., teacher. 
Shepard, Nana (Mrs. Gates Ayers), 91, Jobs 

Corners, Pa. 
Shepard, Nettie, 87, Mansfield, Pa., teacher. 
Sherer, Hannah (Mrs. Hannah S. Lusch), M. 

73, No. 567 Carlton Ave. .Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Sherer, Mary, 70, South Montrose. Pa. 
Sherer, Sarah A.. 71, No. 564 Carlton Ave., 

Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Sherman, E. H„ 87, Springfield, Pa. .teacher. 
Sherman, Effle Agnes, 96, Covert Pa., 

f pa plipi* 

Sherman, Rosemond E., 96, Mansfield, Pa., 

Sherwood, Hugh M., 92, Mansfield, Pa., sur- 
veyor and law student. 

Sherwood, Minnie Elizabeth, 94, Washington, 
D. C.. teacher. 

SUipman, Mabel Rose, 93, Mansfield, Pa., 
teacher. 



86 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL FIFTH DISTRICT 



John Samuel), 93, 



Shove, Fannie H. (Mrs. F, E. Watrous), 7.5, Smith, Mildred (Mrs 

Wellsboro, Fa. Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

•Shove, Sara J. (Mrs. C. H Knox), 615. Smith. Morton Hartman, M. D., 94. Mans- 

Shultz, John A., 87, Arnot. Pa, clerk. Held, Pa. 

Sidman, Mrs. Arthur C. (nee Ella May Smith, Mrs. Nelson (nee Edith Rose), 95, 

Brooks), 90, Hornellsville. N. Y. Mainesburg, Pa. 

Silvias, Gertrude Minerva, 94, No. IS South Smith, K. Belle, M. D. (Mrs. Dr. Charles A. 

Wells St., Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. Beach), 75. Waverly, N. Y. 

Silvias, Lulu Ruth, 90, No. 18 South Wells Smith. Samuel W., 71, Port Allegany, Pa., 

St., Wilkes Barre. Pa., teacher. lawyer. 

Simmons. Frank w.. 8-2, Salamanca. N. Y., Smoulter. Elizabeth C, 88, Wilkes Barre, 

traveling auditor U. S. Leather Co. Pa., teacher. 

Simmons. Mrs. Rev. F. P. (nee Ida L. Lowns-Snover. Stella (Mrs. Fred H. Pratt), 89, East 

berry), 88. Fillmore. N. Y. Charleston. Pa. 

Simmons, John L., 89, Salamanca, N. Y.. Snyder. Mrs. (nee Cora E Hexford), 81, Lee- 
teacher, tonia. Pa. 
Simmons, Julia A., 96, Mansfield, Pa., Soper, Clinton Elbert, 91, Covington, Pa., 

teacher. teacher. 

Simmons. Laura L. (Mrs. Myron L. Whit- Soper, David M., 96, Covington. Pa. .teacher. 

man), 76. Farmington Hill, Pa. Soper, Elwin, 69, Rutland. Pa., farmer. 

Simrell, Carrie Agnes, 90, Wilkes Barre, Pa., Soper, Merritt, 95, Mainesburg, Pa., student 

teacher. Syracuse University. 

•Simrell. Eugene W.. 73. Spaulding. Rose. 94, Chatham Valley. Pa. 

Skelton, Fred W., 95. Wellsboro, Pa., teacher. Spear. William, 96. Wyoming, Pa., teacher. 
Slade, Byron B., 69, Whitesville, N. Y., drug- Spencer. Emma D., 88, Eleven Mile. Pa., 

gist. teacher. 

*Smalley. Mrs.W.R.(nee Helen H.Loomis), 71. Spencer, Elwin A., 74,CanoeCamp,Pa.. miller. 
Smilev. Mrs. J. Mert (nee Cora A. Haight), Spencer, Flora I. (Mrs. A. E. Bellows), 09 

90, E. Canton. Pa. Frankford. Mich. 

Smith. Augustus B.. M. D., 82. No. 51 EastSpencer, Fred Fellows, 92, Mansfield, Pa., 

Diamond St., Allegheny City, Pa. merchant. 

Smith, Belle A.. 90, Starrucca, Pa., teacher. Spencer, Ina V. (Mrs. Lewis K. Foote), 86, 
Smith, Bertha Gertrude, 92, Liberty, Pa., I Annin Creek. Pa. 

teacher. .Spencer. Louis A., 85, West Superior, Wis., 

Smith. Burton E., 83, New Miltord, Pa.. lawyer. 

teacher. Sperry, Eva E., 84, Wellsboro. Pa., deputy 

Smith, Mrs. Delbert C. (nee Adaline May Register and Recorder Tioga Co., and 

Ripley). 92, Mainesburg. Pa. lawyer. 

Smith, Carrie Mabel, 90, Montrose, Pa., ! Speer, Mrs. William (nee Eva Peck), 72, Os- 

teacher. . ceola. Pa. 

Smith, Cora Belle, 90, M. 91, Binghamton. Sprague, Mrs. W. L. (nee Alice A. Everett) 

N. Y. M. 73, Buffalo. N. Y. 

Smith, Ella M. (Mrs.V. Fletcher), 87, Malnes- Spurr. Mrs. G. D. (nee Fannie J. Voorhees), 

burg, Pa. 68. Puyallup, Wash. 

Smith, Francis M.. 71, S. 74, Arcade. Wyom- Squier. Etta (Mrs. Frank F. James), 88, Ely, 

oming Co., N. Y„ principal of schools. Minn. 

Smith. Mrs. Francis M. (nee Florence A .Squier, Vloletta, 88. Niven. Pa., teacher. 

Keeney), 72. Arcade. N. Y. Squires, Arthur William, 94, Sullivan, Pa., 



Smith. Galas K... 80, Mount Pleasant, Pa , teacher. 

clergyman. Stair, Albert E., 

Smith, Grace L . 91. Montrose. Pa., teacher. teacher. 



95, Alden Station, Pa., 



Smith, Joseph N . M. D.. 80, Pittsburg, Pa. Stalford, Florence May, 96, Wyalusing, Pa., 
Smith, Mrs. J. T. (nee Lucy Bunnell), 88, teacher. 

Montrose. Pa. Stapleton, Daniel P., 79, Lewisburg, Pa., 

Smith, Katherine D., 88. Dunmore, Pa., principal of schools. 

teacher. Stark, John Gerry. 87, Ithaca, Neb., cashier 

Smith. Louis H.. 97, Shingle House, Pa.. Ithaca State Bank. 

teacher. stark, Oscar David, 88, East Lemon, Pa , 

Smith, Lloyd B.. 96, Laceyville, Pa. .teacher. teacher. 

Smith. Nelson J., 95, Mainesburg, Pa., Starkey, Emma L. (Mrs. A.Waldo Lugg), 86, 

teacher. Knoxville, Pa. 

Smith, Margaret G., 92, mo. 71 Loomis St.jstarkey. Foster H., 81, (Grad. Harvard), 

Wilkes Barre, Pa., teacher. Mansfield. Pa., teacher. 

Smith, Mary P. (nee Mary Pitts), Osawato- Starner, Chas. J., 81, Lindley, N.Y., teacher. 

mie. Kan. Starner. Herbert R., 84, Ulysses, Pa., station 

Smith, Melvin Eugene, M. 91, Syracuse.N.Y. 1 agent. 



I 



Programme of Classes for the Year J 898-99. 



Fall Term. 



Periods 


8.00 j 9.00 j 9.45 i 10.30 11.15 j 1.15 2.00 


2.45 


3.30 


Prepara- 
tory and 
.Junior. 


Arith 
Writing 

Alg (C) 


Alg (b) Arith (a) 
Arith (b) Drw (bVPhysiol 
Drw (h) Hist (b) Alg (c) 

Gym 1, 2 Gym 3, 4 


iGe'g (b> Gram (a) £ Jri *, £ 
DrwiblSpemngi^JJing 

Gym5,6 Lat (b) Ag t ™ e 


Gram(c) 
Geog (a) 

Latin(l)) 
Gym 7, 8 


Method 

Nature 
Study 
Gym 
9.10 


Senior 


Methods 
Psychol 


Physics 
(b)2 


Caesar 
(b)l 
Gym 1, 2 


Caesar 
(b)3 
Gym 8; 4 


Rtiet 1 
Geom 

(b) 2 
Gym5,G 


Geom(b) 
3 


Agricul- 
ture 


Rhetor 3 
Gym 7, 8 


G His 2 

Physic 

(b)l 

Gy9, 10 


College 
Prepar'y 




c»>sav AdvGer 
cassai Anab 




Virgil 


Ger (c) 


Greek(c) 
Agricul 




Q His 


Keg. Nor. 
and Sci. 


Zool^f 

Geo! Y t 


Cassar 


Adv'ncd 
German 


Logic % 


Virgil 


Ger (c) 


Agricul Higher j 
Greek(c)! Algebra 


GHis 



Winter Term. 



Periods 



Prepara- 
tory and 
Junior 



(.00 



Arith (c) 
Writing 
Alg (c) 



9.45 



10.30 11.15 1.15 



2.00 



2.45 



Alg do 



nl-w n 4Ht ,. ,„> Ge'g(b) Gram(a) Gram(b) Gram(c) 
Aritb(b) \'r ]!, V \Z j.,,' i ', Drw (a) Spelling Reading Geog (a) 
Drw (b) pi',;'. ',-:,,'';,,.,' V. Alg (a) Latin(b) Agricul Latin(a) 

Gym 1 2 Gym5,« Histy(b) Alg (b) Gym 7, 8 



| 3.30 

method 

Nature 
Study 
Gym 
9, 10 



Geom 



Senior 



) Methods 
Psychol 



Physics lcse^(a) 1 Caes(b) 2, (b)1,Geom .„„■„,,, lRhet2 
(a) 2Gyml,2|Gyrn3,4 EnLUa (a) s\ Agrlcm |Gym7, 8! 
Gyra5,6 



Phy b 3 
G His 1 
Gym 
" 10 



College 
Prepar'y 


Caesar's 
CiceroX 


Adv Ger 
Anab's 


Virgil 


Ger (b) Agricul 'riTTis 
Greek(b) u Mls 


Reg. Nor. 
and Sci, 


Astr. 


CassarX 
CiceroX 


Adv. Moral 
Germ'n Science 


Virgil 


Ger (b) Agricul Higher 
Greek(b) Algebra 


G His 



Spring Term. 



Periods 


8.00 


9.00 


9.45 


10.30 1 11.15 


1.15 j 2.00 2.45 1 3.30 


Prepara- 
tory and 
Junior 


Methods 
Nature 
Study 
Book 
keeping 


Arith (b) 
Writing 
Alg (a) 


Drw (b) 
Arith (a) 
Hist. V 
Civics Vi 
Gym 1, 2 


Drw (a) 
Physiol 
Botany 
Gym 3, 4 


Artb(a) 
Ge'g(a) 
Drw(a) 
Botany 
Gym5,8 


Gram(a) 
Spelling 
Latin (a) 
Botany 


Gram(a) 
Re'ding 
Alg (a) 


Geog;(a) 
Gram(b) 
Latin (a) 
Botany 

Gym 7, 8 


Vocal 

Music 
Gym 
9,10 


Senior 


Hist of 
Educa'n 


Physics 
(a) 3 


Cses(a) 2 
Gym 1,2 


C^sca \ 3 Ge< £> 1 Geom I Kn « li sn Pbys al 

vmS ' E Lit o (a) o Agricul Lit 1 G His 3 

Gym 3, 4t Lit (a) 2 |Gym7,8,Gy 9, 10 


College 
Prepar'y 


Cicero 

Latin 

Compos 


Ad Ger 
Homer 
Greek 

Compos 




Virgil ;Ger(a) ^gjjgg 




GHis 


Reg. Nor. 
and Sci. 


Trigo- 

nom'ty 


Cicero 
Latin 

Compos 


Advnc'd Advnc'd 
German Psychol 




Ger (a) 


Agricul 
Gr'ek(a) 
Chemis 


Solid 
Geom